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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2007
Maryland officials looking for ways to save the state's dairy industry need only cast an eye on Pennsylvania and several other East Coast states for guidance. Measures taken in other states include tax credits for farmers; the setting of a minimum price that farmers are paid for their milk; and subsidies to farmers. Officials say such programs are good for business because farming makes significant contributions to those states' economies. Moreover, officials say, the programs help the states meet consumer demand for an adequate supply of locally produced milk and preserve rural land.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Del., Jim Mathias, the former mayor of Ocean City, filed paperwork this week to run for the state Senate — a Democratic bid for a long-held Republican seat on the Eastern Shore. Republican Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus, who has represented the area for nearly two decades, is retiring. District 38 includes Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties and is represented by Del. Norman H. Conway, a Democrat who leads the House Appropriations Committee, Republican Del. D. Page Elmore and Mathias, who was appointed in 2006 to fill the seat of the late Bennett Bozman.
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NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 2001
BRILLIANT, Ohio - A faint yellow gas wafts from smokestacks along the Ohio River. It is full of hazardous pollutants, which is nothing new here in the core of the industrial Midwest, a gritty region built on manufacturing and heavy industry and accustomed to the ill effects. But 300 miles and a world away in Washington, this gas, how far it travels in the wind and whom it harms are at the heart of an intensifying fight over how to generate power while still protecting the environment. For both sides, there is this new reality: George W. Bush has made energy production a centerpiece of his presidency.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | March 22, 2010
Host Salisbury (8-0), ranked No. 3 in Division III, won by its largest margin of the season, 20-6, against Eastern Connecticut State (3-2). Matt Cannone scored three of his team-high four goals in the first half. Senior midfielder Mike Von Kamecke had four goals and four assists for a career-best eight points. Division I: Georgetown (4-2, 2-1) cruised to a 14-4 victory over host Providence (0-5, 0-1) in the Friars' first Big East game ever. Georgetown led 8-0 at halftime.
SPORTS
February 28, 1991
Salisbury State (22-6) launches its Division III basketball tournament bid Saturday night at Ramapo (N.J.) College (21-6). The Sea Gulls, winners of the Eastern States Athletic Conference championship, are seeded third and Ramapo is second in the Atlantic Region.Salisbury has a 12-game winning streak and features 6-6 junior Andre Foreman, MVP of the conference tournament with 90 points and 41 rebounds in three games.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Senate removed the final hurdle yesterday for an $8.7 billion package of emergency disaster relief for farmers -- a package that lawmakers from Maryland and other Eastern states said slights their region.By a vote of 79-20, the Senate blocked a filibuster attempt by the Eastern senators and cleared the way for a final vote today.After Senate approval of the bill, which has been passed by the House, the measure will go to the White House. President Clinton is expected to sign it."
NEWS
November 27, 2002
ALWAYS BEWARE of news released quietly from the White House on a Friday afternoon. It's usually something the administration hopes will not attract a lot of attention as America's focus turns to the weekend. Which probably means the news isn't something the president wants to brag about. Certainly that definition should apply to the circumstances of last Friday. The Bush administration put out the word that it was going to let power plants and other polluting industries take a pass on federal requirements that they clean up their acts.
NEWS
May 16, 1993
Germany's descent from euphoria to despond since the glorious days of reunification in late 1989 goes on and on. Some might attribute this to the usual German angst -- this, despite the fact that the country is the envy (and central banker) of Europe. But Germany's current problems are real and serious and of concern to its American allies.Simultaneously, the nation is being wracked by recession, strikes, neo-Nazi violence, friction between its western and eastern regions and, most important, a sharp decline of public confidence in the political establishment.
NEWS
By Robert Gerald Livingston | April 2, 1997
TRAVEL THROUGHOUT the eastern part of Germany, the states that until 1990 composed the communist German Democratic Republic, and you see cranes, bulldozers and backhoes everywhere. Autobahns have been widened and resurfaced, railroad track relaid; shopping malls built outside large towns and small; and Dresden's baroque places along the Elbe are being lovingly restored.Behind such infrastructural improvements and a dramatic rise in eastern Germans' living standards (wages have been lifted to 80-90 percent of western levels)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
Warning that consumers could pay more than necessary for cleaner air, the auto industry has launched a media blitz pressing Maryland and other East Coast states to drop controversial smog-cleanup plans requiring sales of electric and natural-gas cars.The radio and newspaper ad campaign, begun this week from Maine to Maryland, comes as state officials move closer to accepting an auto industry alternative that drops any mandate for selling "advanced technology" vehicles throughout the Northeast and mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2007
Maryland officials looking for ways to save the state's dairy industry need only cast an eye on Pennsylvania and several other East Coast states for guidance. Measures taken in other states include tax credits for farmers; the setting of a minimum price that farmers are paid for their milk; and subsidies to farmers. Officials say such programs are good for business because farming makes significant contributions to those states' economies. Moreover, officials say, the programs help the states meet consumer demand for an adequate supply of locally produced milk and preserve rural land.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
A first-term state senator from the Eastern Shore has scheduled appearances across the state Monday to announce his decision to run against U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski next year. Republican Sen. E.J. Pipkin, who rose to prominence after defeating a veteran committee chairman last year, declined to comment on the scheduled appearances, including one at Waters Edge Park in Dundalk at 11 a.m. Pipkin's decision to run drew praise from State GOP Chairman John Kane. "We're really excited that Senator Pipkin is running," Kane said.
NEWS
November 27, 2002
ALWAYS BEWARE of news released quietly from the White House on a Friday afternoon. It's usually something the administration hopes will not attract a lot of attention as America's focus turns to the weekend. Which probably means the news isn't something the president wants to brag about. Certainly that definition should apply to the circumstances of last Friday. The Bush administration put out the word that it was going to let power plants and other polluting industries take a pass on federal requirements that they clean up their acts.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2002
Sierra Military Health Services Inc. announced yesterday that it has been awarded a $1 billion, four-year extension of its Defense Department contract to provide health care services to military personnel in 13 states. The contract secures the jobs of about 750 workers, including about 500 in downtown Baltimore, said David R. Nelson, Sierra's president. Just as important, the new award puts the Baltimore-based company in a favorable position to win an even larger military health care contract in the future that could boost its employment to 1,500 workers, perhaps as many as 2,000, Nelson said.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 2001
BRILLIANT, Ohio - A faint yellow gas wafts from smokestacks along the Ohio River. It is full of hazardous pollutants, which is nothing new here in the core of the industrial Midwest, a gritty region built on manufacturing and heavy industry and accustomed to the ill effects. But 300 miles and a world away in Washington, this gas, how far it travels in the wind and whom it harms are at the heart of an intensifying fight over how to generate power while still protecting the environment. For both sides, there is this new reality: George W. Bush has made energy production a centerpiece of his presidency.
NEWS
April 10, 2000
PUBLIC LAND should be for public use. Sounds like an obvious statement, doesn't it? But consider how often government acquires land but does not allow public access. It's not a given right. In small measure, that debate is taking place on the Eastern Shore over hunting privileges on some 58,000 acres of land that the state is acquiring. At issue is whether hunting in the forests and wetlands should be reserved for the clubs that now lease the land or opened to the general public. The land was part of the vast Delmarva holdings ofChesapeake Forest Products Co. until last year.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | January 7, 1992
Around the perimeter* QUICK STUDY: After winning the NCAA title last year, the Tennessee women quickly reloaded, signing four of the first 10 players listed on the USA Today All-America team. The prize catch was supposed to be Tiffany Woosley, a homegrown guard out of Shelbyville, Tenn., who was the National Player of the Year in 1990-91. But the most productive member of the Vols' freshman class is Dana Johnson.Johnson was nearly unstoppable inside during her stay at Western High, but The Evening Sun Athlete of the Year has impressed Tennessee coach Pat Summitt with her ability to run the floor.
NEWS
April 8, 1994
Mrs. Clinton only played the capitalist gameMuch has been said and written about Hillary Rodham Clinton's investment in the futures market.There is no dearth of experts and no dearth of opinions. All the pundits and saints have not so far presented an iota of evidence to say there was any criminal wrong-doing on the part of the First Lady regarding her investments.She speculated and won big, albeit with the help or advice of some friends. Does this make her wrong?As Kenny Rogers advises, she knew when to play and knew when to quit.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Senate removed the final hurdle yesterday for an $8.7 billion package of emergency disaster relief for farmers -- a package that lawmakers from Maryland and other Eastern states said slights their region.By a vote of 79-20, the Senate blocked a filibuster attempt by the Eastern senators and cleared the way for a final vote today.After Senate approval of the bill, which has been passed by the House, the measure will go to the White House. President Clinton is expected to sign it."
NEWS
By Robert Gerald Livingston | April 2, 1997
TRAVEL THROUGHOUT the eastern part of Germany, the states that until 1990 composed the communist German Democratic Republic, and you see cranes, bulldozers and backhoes everywhere. Autobahns have been widened and resurfaced, railroad track relaid; shopping malls built outside large towns and small; and Dresden's baroque places along the Elbe are being lovingly restored.Behind such infrastructural improvements and a dramatic rise in eastern Germans' living standards (wages have been lifted to 80-90 percent of western levels)
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