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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | November 23, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The native flowering dogwood tree, prized for its springtime flowers and brilliant scarlet hues in fall, is threatened with destruction by an incurable disease sweeping the Eastern Seaboard, plant experts say.In Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park, where the presidential retreat Camp David is, the fungus already has killed 90 percent of the dogwood trees, known as Cornus florida.In the dozen years since the fungus, called anthracnose, was detected in the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx, it has killed dogwoods in forests and woodlots from New York to Georgia and Alabama and as far west as Ohio.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Storm trackers are continuing to refine their predictions for a nor'easter set to strike Maryland later this week, calling for strong rain and wind on Wednesday - most heavily along the Eastern Shore - and possibly snow on Thursday. "We're not looking at Sandy-type numbers, but it looks like this thing could pack a pretty good punch," said Steve Goldstein, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, about what residents can expect from the storm on the heels of superstorm Sandy's pounding.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin | January 30, 1992
Despite an alert throughout 13 states along the Eastern seaboard, two men sought in the serious beating Tuesday night of a Baltimore County police officer remain at large today.Also sought by Baltimore County police is a beige Chevrolet Monte Carlo bearing dealer license plates 1A47651 that the men escaped in.Police said the plates were stolen earlier Tuesday from a car owned by an employee of A&B Auto Sales in the 6200 block of Belair Road in the city.Officer Darryl Chesney, 26, of the Cockeysville District, was attacked by two men on a country road in Freeland and beaten about the head with his own heavy-duty flashlight, police said.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
With almost every regulatory hurdle cleared, planners believe they are about two weeks away from sinking a 563-foot former Navy destroyer off the coast of Maryland to create the largest artificial reef on the Eastern Seaboard. The Arthur W. Radford, docked in Philadelphia, is nearing the end of a laborious effort to remove all salvageable and toxic material and pass inspection by federal environmental and maritime safety officials, Erik Zlokovitz, artificial reef coordinator for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources told a state fisheries advisory commission Tuesday night.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 17, 2007
Hundreds of dinosaur footprints, in rocks plucked from Maryland streambeds by an amateur paleontologist, are being described in a scientific journal as among the most significant of their age in North America since the 1930s. The tracks reveal the presence more than 112 million years ago of at least 14 different kinds of animals, from carnivorous and plant-eating dinosaurs to birds, lizards and mammals. That's twice the diversity found anywhere else in rocks from the same period, the Early Cretaceous.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
Marylanders fascinated with the news of the burglary at Democratic campaign headquarters at the Watergate in Washington, probably paid little attention to a routine weather story.An Associated Press brief in The Sun June 20, 1972, reported: "Hurricane Agnes smashed the Florida panhandle with 80-mile-an-hour winds, heavy rains and raging seas yesterday, but its fury started to subside as it churned inland. At least 12 persons, five in Florida, were left dead in the wake of the 1972 hurricane season's first storm."
NEWS
October 17, 1999
Jean Shepherd, 78, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to fellow Midwesterner Mark Twain, died early yesterday. Mr. Shepherd, described by media critic Marshall McLuhan as "the first radio novelist," died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Mr. Shepherd spent 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, attracting a large following along the Eastern seaboard.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Concerned about the prospect of 25 homes on an 8-acre site outside Westminster, residents are lobbying City Hall to prevent development of the property. About 50 people - mostly residents of Chase and Bond streets, Ridgeview Drive and Ridge Road - showed up at the Common Council's meeting Monday to raise concerns about a local company's proposal to develop the so-called Arnold property into a subdivision. "It's going to add more traffic volume to already swollen roads," said Thomas C. Bethune, a Westmoreland Street resident who lives a block from the parcel.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro | August 18, 2002
Colorful and clever, they swam into Baltimore, irresistible visual puns on all things fishy and Charm City. They arrived by way of the corporately sponsored Fish Out of Water project, for which artists decorated nearly 200 6-foot-long fiberglass fish for display around the city last summer and fall. Then, one by one, they swam away to libraries, churches, new public spaces and private homes. The Fish Out of Water school taught about the ability of civic art to delight and "pay it forward."
NEWS
April 5, 2003
Stephen Kiehl's article in the March 30 Sun asked, "Would anyone ride the maglev?" The answer is that there is a high probability some 30,000 to 33,000 riders a day would use the maglev in its initial year of operation of 2010. This estimate comes from a careful and painstaking study by Alex Metcalf, a national expert in travel projection who used survey and analytic procedures that have proved successful for many other highway and rail projects throughout the world. The maglev system is not intended for the average commuter who travels between Baltimore and Washington daily.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,[Sun reporter] | November 1, 2007
For the first time in 15 years, Maryland striped bass anglers will have a spring trophy season designed and managed by state fisheries officials. By an overwhelming margin, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission yesterday relinquished control of the state's most popular and lucrative season for 2008, thereby eliminating an annual quota that was often exceeded and allowing Maryland to regulate its season the way other Eastern Seaboard states do....
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 17, 2007
Hundreds of dinosaur footprints, in rocks plucked from Maryland streambeds by an amateur paleontologist, are being described in a scientific journal as among the most significant of their age in North America since the 1930s. The tracks reveal the presence more than 112 million years ago of at least 14 different kinds of animals, from carnivorous and plant-eating dinosaurs to birds, lizards and mammals. That's twice the diversity found anywhere else in rocks from the same period, the Early Cretaceous.
NEWS
By Barbara Sattler and Anna Gilmore Hall | March 25, 2005
JUST WHEN medical waste incinerators are going the way of dinosaurs, Baltimore is being stalked by the Tyrannosaurus rex of polluting technologies. The unusual saga of Baltimore's Phoenix Services incinerator - the largest medical waste incinerator in the country - is about to reach a new level of public scrutiny, and the stakes are high for the health of local families. City Councilman Edward L. Reisinger has introduced an ordinance to reduce the geographic area served by Phoenix from the current 250-mile radius - which includes New York City and other major metropolitan areas along the Eastern seaboard - to eight counties within Maryland.
NEWS
April 5, 2003
Stephen Kiehl's article in the March 30 Sun asked, "Would anyone ride the maglev?" The answer is that there is a high probability some 30,000 to 33,000 riders a day would use the maglev in its initial year of operation of 2010. This estimate comes from a careful and painstaking study by Alex Metcalf, a national expert in travel projection who used survey and analytic procedures that have proved successful for many other highway and rail projects throughout the world. The maglev system is not intended for the average commuter who travels between Baltimore and Washington daily.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Integrated Health Services Inc., the bankrupt nursing home operator, said yesterday that Abe Briarwood Corp. submitted the highest bid for its assets, trumping a $327.5 million bid from a rival health care company. Details of the bid, which came at an auction held Wednesday, were not disclosed, and it is unclear how many employees Briarwood would maintain in Maryland or whether it would seek to keep the Sparks headquarters. "The details of the bid will be included in the company's plan of reorganization," said Doug Morris, a spokesman for Integrated.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro | August 18, 2002
Colorful and clever, they swam into Baltimore, irresistible visual puns on all things fishy and Charm City. They arrived by way of the corporately sponsored Fish Out of Water project, for which artists decorated nearly 200 6-foot-long fiberglass fish for display around the city last summer and fall. Then, one by one, they swam away to libraries, churches, new public spaces and private homes. The Fish Out of Water school taught about the ability of civic art to delight and "pay it forward."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Even as Steve Zucker mapped travel plans yesterday for newly minted free agent Eric Swann, he tossed out a lifeline to Baltimore. The Ravens, Zucker said, are one of the teams on Swann's radar screen. "He wants to go to a contender," said Zucker, Swann's Chicago-based agent. "He would like to play on the eastern seaboard. And he lives in Reston, Va. He built a home there last year. "Baltimore would be on his list." It's a short list. One day after the veteran defensive tackle was cut by the Arizona Cardinals in a long-rumored salary-cap move, Swann visited the Carolina Panthers.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Integrated Health Services Inc., the bankrupt nursing home operator, said yesterday that Abe Briarwood Corp. submitted the highest bid for its assets, trumping a $327.5 million bid from a rival health care company. Details of the bid, which came at an auction held Wednesday, were not disclosed, and it is unclear how many employees Briarwood would maintain in Maryland or whether it would seek to keep the Sparks headquarters. "The details of the bid will be included in the company's plan of reorganization," said Doug Morris, a spokesman for Integrated.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Concerned about the prospect of 25 homes on an 8-acre site outside Westminster, residents are lobbying City Hall to prevent development of the property. About 50 people - mostly residents of Chase and Bond streets, Ridgeview Drive and Ridge Road - showed up at the Common Council's meeting Monday to raise concerns about a local company's proposal to develop the so-called Arnold property into a subdivision. "It's going to add more traffic volume to already swollen roads," said Thomas C. Bethune, a Westmoreland Street resident who lives a block from the parcel.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Even as Steve Zucker mapped travel plans yesterday for newly minted free agent Eric Swann, he tossed out a lifeline to Baltimore. The Ravens, Zucker said, are one of the teams on Swann's radar screen. "He wants to go to a contender," said Zucker, Swann's Chicago-based agent. "He would like to play on the eastern seaboard. And he lives in Reston, Va. He built a home there last year. "Baltimore would be on his list." It's a short list. One day after the veteran defensive tackle was cut by the Arizona Cardinals in a long-rumored salary-cap move, Swann visited the Carolina Panthers.
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