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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
A family crime organization trafficked more than $6.6 million in black market cigarettes and more in illegal foreign drugs through a Baltimore restaurant and a Pikesville pharmacy that received a Baltimore County-backed loan, authorities said in a federal indictment that was unsealed Wednesday. Authorities said the "Yusufov organization" laundered the proceeds of their operations through wire transfers to Eastern Europe. Some of those accused also established themselves as legitimate businesspeople in the community.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The 6 o'clock news is gloomy enough as it is. Imagine if, every day at twilight, it also involved the threat from a sniper who liked to pick off random victims as they gathered in front of their TV sets to watch the broadcast. The resulting unease and disorientation from such a scenario, the sense that the center will definitely not hold, gives a neat edge to "The Apocalypse Comes at 6PM," a satiric/surrealistic work from 2010 by Bulgarian writer Georgi Gospodinov. The play, now onstage at Single Carrot Theatre in an English translation by Angela Rodel, packs in a lot of biting commentary on contemporary society, relationships, alienation ("I had some friends during the 1980s; then they bought a VCR")
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NEWS
August 21, 1991
The reactionary coup in the Soviet Union will not restoreCommunist dictatorships in countries of Eastern Europe that Mikhail S. Gorbachev let go free. And while it might bring inspiration and hope to orthodox Communists in those countries, it is unlikely to come to their aid.Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia have anti-Communist regimes that, whatever their own frailty, count for support on popular detestation of former Communist regimes. East Germany, a former enforcer of Soviet dictates, is no longer a country but a part of West Germany.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | October 30, 1995
At THE HEIGHT of interest in Eastern Europe, some of us thought that interest in that part of the world was high. That was a mistake. The American people were not that interested. The media was.I wrote a book about the dramatic events in Romania in 1989, which culminated with the execution of the dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu. Shortly after that, I gave a talk to an interested group and someone asked me a question. He began, ''Can you tell us, Mr. Ceausescu . . .?'' People laughed. I laughed.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | December 8, 1993
ON Oct. 22, exactly one day after Congress granted Romania most-favored-nation trade status, a statue of Ion Antonescu was erected in the town of Slobozia, near Bucharest.General Antonescu, the fascist dictator during World War II, was responsible for the deaths of at least 250,000 Jews and 20,000 Gypsies. This is the first statue of a war criminal from Eastern Europe erected since the war.The dedication was attended by government officials such as Mihai Ungheanu, an aide to former President Nicolae Ceausescu and currently secretary of state for culture, and Corneliu Vadim Tudor, a member of Parliament who is a vicious anti-Semite.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
GENEVA -- As President Clinton wraps up his eight-day European trip today, the answer to the central question of his visit -- whether it did Eastern Europe any good -- sounds like an old Russian riddle.Who has all the power in the world in the post-Cold War era? Answer: the president of the United States.Well who, then, can help the beleaguered people of the former Soviet empire? Answer: certainly not the president of the United States.Everything on Mr. Clinton's trip, his most visible foray into foreign affairs so far, went as well as or better than the White House had hoped.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | September 22, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- The emerging economies of Eastern Europe, pushed out of their Communist cocoons into the hurly-burly of the free market, are discovering that the ties they saw as chains also functioned as protective arms.And it is the gulf crisis and spiraling oil prices that have shown them how cushioned they once were by Moscow's suffocating embrace.Eastern Europe did a lively trade with Iraq and allowed that country to accumulate a sizable foreign debt that it paid in oil. Iraq owes Poland a half-million dollars accumulated from arms sales (which amounted to $115 million in 1989 alone)
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 31, 1990
One year after crowds swept through the streets of Eastern Europe toppling communist dictators with demands for more freedom, the region's women have found democracy a less than liberating experience."
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | March 20, 2014
President Barack Obama came into office promising to limit United States commitments abroad in order to focus on the economy and health care at home. Such an approach may have been prudent immediately after the excesses of the Bush administration, but strong measures are needed now to confront the crisis in Ukraine. During the past few weeks, political instability in Ukraine led to the resignation and flight of the pro-Russian president. Russia responded by invading part of Ukraine, Crimea, then engineering a vote for independence in that region.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
The swiftly unfolding of events in Ukraine over the weekend saw chanting crowds depose the country's president, political prisoners freed from jail, the emergence of an interim government led by opposition figures and warrants for the arrest of former security officials who ordered police to fire on demonstrators in Kiev. The rapid developments apparently caught both U.S. and European Union officials by surprise, coming as they did only hours after those powers had signed a deal with Russia for a more gradual transition.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
A family crime organization trafficked more than $6.6 million in black market cigarettes and more in illegal foreign drugs through a Baltimore restaurant and a Pikesville pharmacy that received a Baltimore County-backed loan, authorities said in a federal indictment that was unsealed Wednesday. Authorities said the "Yusufov organization" laundered the proceeds of their operations through wire transfers to Eastern Europe. Some of those accused also established themselves as legitimate businesspeople in the community.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
A moment as mysterious as the sacred idea it celebrates - the crucified Christ's decent into Hades before his resurrection - arrived Saturday morning at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in a cascade of rose petals and a cacophony of bells, hands drumming on wood pews and a church elder chanting in his ancestral tongue. It was a rich, even raucous moment affirming belief in Christ's conquest of evil and heralding the arrival of the church's most significant holiday. This year, the Eastern Orthodox Church - the faith of an estimated 300 million people from the United States through Eastern Europe and the Middle East - celebrates Easter a month after the Western Christian observance, capping 40 days of fasting and a week of services marking different stages of the paschal narrative.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
Infamous presidential quotes through history: 1. "The American people have got a right to know that their president is not a crook. " Richard Nixon. 2. "There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe. " Gerald Ford. 3. "Read my lips: No new taxes. "George H.W. Bush. 4. "I did not have sex with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky. " William Clinton. 5. "The notion that my White House would purposefully leak classified national security information is offensive. " Barack Obama.
NEWS
By Mary Newsom | September 8, 2011
Green Square in Tripoli. Tahrir Square in Cairo. The new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on Washington's National Mall. We humans know, deep inside, that public places - squares and greens and plazas that are open to all - are more than just spaces for crowds. Humans are social beings, and most of us understand on some level that coming together across class, ethnic and gender lines provides some of the glue that helps hold civilization together. Libya's celebrations, Egypt's protesters and even those annual July 4 throngs at the Mall are reminders of the symbolic and literal relationship between public places and democracy.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Long known for spicing up American food, McCormick & Co. is taking its food flavorings abroad, with plans to peddle masala powder in the open-air markets of India and borscht seasoning in the stores of Eastern Europe. Looking for ways to beef up sales in the face of a weak economy and a mature domestic market , the Sparks-based spice maker is increasing its push into emerging nations. McCormick, like other food companies, sees potential for growth in regions where American brands are becoming more commonplace — and gaining market share by expanding their lines to include products demanded by local consumers.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A group that salvages Holocaust-era Torahs from Europe and sells them to congregations in the United States has agreed to stop promoting dramatic rescue stories unless it can document them, according to an agreement with Maryland authorities sparked by complaints about the group's practices. An investigation into the operations of Save a Torah of Rockville followed a Washington Post Magazine article that raised questions about stories told by Rabbi Menachem Youlus, the group's leader.
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