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FEATURES
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
— For watermen who require safe passage to Chesapeake Bay oyster bars and fishing grounds each winter, the appearance of one of the state's four ice-breaking ships means money in the bank. Like giant plows on an asphalt road, icebreakers have been carving channels from piers to open waters, clearing away dangerous sheets of ice that can idle the commercial fleet, or worse, punch through the hull of a fishing boat. "Any ice at all is a real hazard for them," Capt. Shawn Orr said Tuesday morning as he guided the 80-foot M/V Sandusky through a row of watermen's boats tied up at Kent Narrows.
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NEWS
February 20, 1991
Elizabeth Tunis Kemp, who operated a guest house on Eastern Bay near McDaniel until she was 90, died Monday at the Memorial Hospital of Easton after a short illness.Graveside services for Mrs. Kemp, who was 97 and lived in McDaniel, are to be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Spring Hill Cemetery in Easton.She had started her guest house in the early 1920s with her husband, D. Earle Kemp, who also operated the family farm for many years before his death in 1970.The former Mildred Tunis was born in Baltimore but reared in Elizabeth City, N.C., where her father was in the lumber business.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
Graveside services for Elizabeth Tunis Kemp, who operated a guest house on Eastern Bay near McDaniel until she was 90, will held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Spring Hill Cemetery in Easton.Mrs. Kemp, who was 97 and lived in McDaniel, died Monday at the Memorial Hospital of Easton after a short illness.She had started her guest house in the early 1920s with her husband, D. Earle Kemp, who also operated the family farm for many years before his death in 1970.The former Mildred Tunis was born in Baltimore but reared in Elizabeth City, N.C., where her father was in the lumber business.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1994
KENT NARROWS -- The manatee -- Florida's official state marine mammal -- has turned up in Maryland waters for the first time.The state Department of Natural Resources is asking boaters near the Chester River and Eastern Bay to be on the lookout for, but not to approach, the 7- to 10-foot-long manatee, or "sea cow," sighted several times over the weekend.A large, aquatic creature found primarily in Florida's warm waters, the manatee is an endangered species. It surfaces to breathe and is susceptible to injury from boat hulls and propellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Literary legend has it that James Michener saw a great blue heron above the St. Michaels property he was inspecting and immediately decided to buy the 25 acres and the old house that sat on a creek off the Choptank River, near the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. It was an omen, he is said to have concluded. This would be where he researched and wrote his next expansive historical novel, "Chesapeake," which would be published in 1978. He called the retreat "Southwind" for the unceasing breeze that blew up the bay. It was the same kind of epiphany that struck Dr. Paul and Anne Yarbrough Gurbel of Baltimore, who had been searching for a weekend home in St. Michaels for two years.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 17, 1995
Bobby Smith's call came at just the right time. "Let's go do some bassin' down on Mattawoman Creek tomorrow," he suggested.I had been on vacation all week and frankly had approached my congenial limits on undersized striped bass and doves that failed to materialize in fields that should have been loaded with them. Some largemouth bassing on the tidal Potomac seemed like the perfect cure to an otherwise frustrating week.Famed Potomac bass guide Ken Penrod once told me, "Mattawoman Creek contains the best ratio of largemouth bass age-to-size than any other tidal water in the state," and despite the tremendous amounts of fishing pressure it faces, that statement holds true.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | August 8, 1993
The Stoney Creek Fishing and Hunting Club is a sportsman's mecca located off of Fort Smallwood Road in Pasadena.The club, founded in 1946, has "400 members and a two-year membership waiting list," said Club President Walt Riddiough.Unlike many private sportsmen's clubs, Stoney Creek goes out of its way to provide recreational shooting opportunities for the general public.Wes Grogan, Club Rangemaster and a former Stoney Creek president, said, "We believe that we owe fellow sportsmen an opportunity to use our shooting facilities because of the ever-increasing problem of too many prospective shooters and hunters and not enough public or private space for them to enjoy."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | March 14, 2010
At a hearing last week in Annapolis on legislation that would prohibit the Department of Natural Resources from creating oyster sanctuaries, state Sen. Richard F. Colburn , the Eastern Shore Republican who sponsored it, asked repeatedly, "How did DNR draw the lines?" In the never-ending quest to answer such questions, Outdoors Girl has torn back the curtain of transparency to find out just how state officials chose which parts of the Chesapeake Bay would be set aside for the multimillion-dollar program to put oysters where they ain't.
SPORTS
August 4, 2000
Fishing report The locations Piney Run: It's finally here. Extending 110 feet from shore, the new fishing pier is open. Night fishing is scheduled for Aug. 10, 18 and 24. Anglers are reporting bluegills, crappie and bass biting on minnows, worms and waxworms. Try fishing top water in the early morning or late in the day for bass, as well. Prettyboy Reservoir: Guide Duke Nohe has had a hot hand. Earlier this year, he caught a 7.2-pound smallmouth. Last weekend, he landed a 7.5-pounder that came out of 18 feet of water to hit a jitterbug just off the boat launch area.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
The Department of Natural Resources is closing the commercial gill net season immediately to ensure watermen don't exceed its monthly striped bass quota and is offering a reward of at least $6,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of poachers who netted 10 tons of rockfish in the waters off Kent Island this week. As patrol boats continue to drag the fish-rich waters of Eastern Bay, Love Point and the Choptank and Chester rivers in search of illegal fishing gear, DNR officials are looking for ways to increase pressure on legal watermen to turn in the renegades who stretch submerged nets across areas where tens of thousands of striped bass travel along the Eastern Shore in winter.
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