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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass. NRP said it shot video to prove in court that the anglers were targeting striped bass and not accidentally catching them while chasing other species.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Jeff Lill is a popular man lately, as captain of the J.C. Widener, one of the state's few ice breakers. After leaving its Annapolis harbor at 8:30 Wednesday morning, the Widener spent the day criss-crossing the waters off Anne Arundel County - beckoned for help from the creeks of the Severn River to government research buoys in the Chesapeake Bay. It cleared paths for a sea trial from an Annapolis marina, a waterman in search of rockfish on the...
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
Lawrence Murphy has been a waterman for 28 of the Chesapeake Bay's leanest years, but he still believes in a generous and forgiving Mother Nature. And this spring in the waters of Eastern Bay near Kent Island, he has been raking in a unique harvest that seems to prove him right:Baby oysters in amazing and mysterious abundance -- so many that 800 million of them are being gathered to help Maryland's Department of Natural Resources re-establish failing oyster...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 16, 2013
If you hurry, you can still catch a free wildlife show at the Inner Harbor. The Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River is alive with big, milky jellyfish swimming lazily about. I'd been hearing from folks about the jellies for the past week or so, then saw them for myself on Tuesday while at the National Aquarium for the kickoff of a new effort to raise oysters in the harbor. It's not unusual to see the balloon-shaped Atlantic sea nettles in the harbor in the fall, said Jack Cover, the aquarium's general curator.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
"I'll be at the Poe House, of course. Halloween weekend is our second biggest time of the year. Whenever I'm done there, I hope to do some evening fishing on the eastern bay. I'll also take the kids trick-or-treating Monday - and no, they don't dress up as Poe characters." - Jeff Jerome, curator, Edgar Allan Poe House Halloween at the Poe House: four performances of The Telltale Heart today and tomorrow beginnning at 12:15 p.m. $5 (12 and under $2). Not recommended for children 7 and under.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
The underwater grasses that provide vital shelter to Chesapeake Bay creatures are rebounding in an important blue crab nursery, but they declined sharply in the middle bay last year, according to a new survey. In Tangier Sound, where juvenile blue crabs rely on the grasses for concealment from predators, the bay's largest underwater meadows expanded by nearly 3,000 acres last year. It was the second year in a row that the grasses grew back, showing signs of recovery after mysterious, enormous losses in 1998.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | October 15, 1991
KENT ISLAND -- Talk of suspense.Sixteen eyes were riveted on the engine box of Joe Bernard's cabin cruiser as Michael Rossbach checked out the center of attraction. The hushed group watched him lay the rule alongside the object of attention.A loud cheer erupted. The rockfish taken on a Rat-L-Trap measured exactly 18 inches. It was a keeper, and our only legal one in a sunrise to past sunset odyssey that took us completely around Kent Island.In all we cast and trolled more than 65 miles in our junket down the Wye, Miles, Eastern Bay, up and down the Chesapeake and past Love Point, into the Chester, and homeward via Kent Narrows.
SPORTS
June 4, 1998
Rockfish on riseMore keepers: Catch reports filed with the Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service indicate that upper Chesapeake Bay rockfish anglers are starting to catch increasing numbers of keepers. The main stem of the Chesapeake above Brewerton Channel at the mouth of the Patapsco River was opened for rockfish on June 1. Until June 15, however, the minimum size remains 28 inches and the creel limit remains 1 per day per person."It looks like the mouth of the Chester [River]
SPORTS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
The weather this spring has had many upper bay fishermen wondering where the rockfish went, as cool, wet conditions kept water temperatures unseasonably low and larger fish off the bite.With daytime temperatures regularly in the 80s now, rockfish action is heating up from the Susquehanna River to the Bay Bridge. In the Susquehanna, some of the best action has been on poppers or live-lined perch. But in the bay proper, it has been hard to beat chumming for the past week or so.Earlier this spring, while the post-spawn runs of rockfish were heavy out of the rivers on the lower Eastern Shore, DNR biologists reported that the upper bay stripers had yet to spawn in great numbers.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER and LONNY WEAVER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1995
"Naw, I think the dove season around here is a total bust," my future son-in-law, Richard Gonsman, replied when I half-heartedly suggested an afternoon of scattergunning.His assessment of the early season matched mine, so I countered with, "How about some striped bass fishing?" and got the young man's immediate attention.And that's how I happened to find myself on a boat with three anglers named Richard, which initially presented a bit of a problem. Like seeing three men dive for the same rod when I unthinkingly set up the alarm, "Richard!
NEWS
September 26, 2013
I read Victoria Weiskopf's letter in The Sun with growing amusement ("Progress comes slow to a space-age town," Sept 25). One would be forgiven for assuming that Ms. Weiskopf and her significant other retired to Virginia's Eastern Shore because, after due diligence, they found the region's lifestyle to their liking. But this is, apparently, not the case. She bemoans the region's "obstacles to real social progress" and its lack of support for a "progressive culture. " In fact, so oppressive do they find their present (meaning not liberal)
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
The protective underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay have dropped to their lowest levels since 2006, according to the latest report from Maryland and Virginia scientists. The scientists from the Chesapeake Bay Program, a regional partnership, view the grasses as a key measure of bay health because they provide shelter for fish and crabs, protect the shoreline and keep the water clear. The program measures the grasses annually from the Susquehanna Flats to the mouth of the bay, as well as those in the system's rivers.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
The tropical storm that deluged Maryland in early September may have killed off many of the oysters in the upper Chesapeake Bay, a Department of Natural Resources spokesman said Monday. DNR spokesman Josh Davidsburg wouldn't say how extensive or severe the die-off was, saying state biologists are still checking. But he did say preliminary reports indicate the bivalves died from an overwhelming influx of fresh water into the upper bay after Tropical Storm Lee, which rained 12 inches or more over much of the region.
SPORTS
April 16, 2011
It shouldn't come as a surprise, I suppose, that the striped bass season began Saturday with uneasy folks focused on the intensity and direction of the wind. Concerns about our own health and well-being on the water aren't much different than the worries a lot of people have about the health and well-being of the fish themselves. Two decades removed from the end of the moratorium that helped bring striped bass back from the brink of extinction, there's a growing feeling that the winds have shifted and we're seeing the makings of another crash.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass. NRP said it shot video to prove in court that the anglers were targeting striped bass and not accidentally catching them while chasing other species.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Natural Resources Police officers recovered another 1,500 yards of illegal fishing net containing 300 pounds of striped bass Wednesday night in Eastern Bay off Kent Island. This is the eighth time in three weeks that patrol boats dragging grappling hooks have snagged submerged nets. The total length of confiscated nets is 5.5 miles and the weight of the poached striped bass, also known as rockfish, is 12.6 tons. NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth said the latest nets had been in the water for some time because officers found decomposing mud shad in them along with live striped bass.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Natural Resources Police found two more illegal nets off Kent Island on Friday, filled with nearly two tons of striped bass. Officers worked until midnight to pull the submerged nets from the Chesapeake Bay and count the fish. One net was about a mile south of Bloody Point, where more than 10 tons of fish have been confiscated. The other net was about 21/2 miles inside Eastern Bay. The 3,879 pounds of fish and more than a mile of nets both appeared to be fresh, indicating that poachers are continuing to net despite increased patrols and public awareness.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 26, 1993
This year's fall striped bass (rockfish) season is set to begin Friday, and Anne Arundel County anglers will find themselves in the middle of the best fishing prospects.Traditional middle Chesapeake Bay hot spots include the area around the Bay Bridges pilings, Eastern Bay, Thomas Point, the Magothy River area, the Chester River area and around Love Point, plus one end of the Choptank to the other. Farther south, in the Potomac, you will find a staggering number of 18-inch and better rockfish.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Natural Resources Police found two more illegal nets off Kent Island on Friday, filled with nearly two tons of striped bass. Officers worked until midnight to pull the submerged nets from the Chesapeake Bay and count the fish. One net was about a mile south of Bloody Point, where more than 10 tons of fish have been confiscated. The other net was about 21/2 miles inside Eastern Bay. The 3,879 pounds of fish and more than a mile of nets both appeared to be fresh, indicating that poachers are continuing to net despite increased patrols and public awareness.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
ABOARD NRP 139 — The fight against striped bass poaching is being fought on the ice-covered deck of a small patrol boat being buffeted by three-foot waves and winds that make you shout to be heard. Natural Resources Police Officer First Class Drew Wilson drops a grappling hook over the side to begin the blind search for illegal fishing nets — mesh death traps — like the type that caught 10 tons of striped bass this week, fish that were destined for Maryland's black market and perhaps beyond.
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