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By Fred J. Eckert and Fred J. Eckert,Universal Press Syndicate | June 11, 2000
It is the land of those mysterious stone giants. That's pretty much all I knew about Easter Island. That's practically all most of us know about it -- vague impressions that we have formed from the images that we have seen of those strange stone statues known as "moai." It is a very different place from what I expected. "That's a pretty scene, isn't it? Those horses out in the field," my guide, Yan Araki, remarked as we headed toward a spot called Ahu Akivi. Yan is a British-educated 28-year-old son of a Chilean doctor father and an Easter Island mother.
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TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | April 12, 2009
Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen arrived on this isolated South Pacific island on Easter Day in 1722 and gave the island its name, but Polynesians had already been living there for more than 1,000 years. It is a territory of Chile, which lies 2,000 miles to the east. While the island has only a few thousand residents year round, it draws tens of thousands of tourists each year who come to see its mysterious monuments. 1 Roam Rano Raraku : This volcanic crater in the Rapa Nui National Park was, for 500 years, a quarry from which the island's inhabitants dug the boulders that they used to make the mysterious sculptures called Moai.
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NEWS
September 21, 1994
Francis Maziere, 70, one of France's foremost explorers and the author of a best-selling book on Easter Island, died Sunday in Paris. He traveled to Easter Island in the Pacific in 1963, hoping to shed light on the origin of the island's giant statues. His book about that trek, "Fantastic Easter Island," sold nearly 1 million copies.Franco Moschino, 44, the ironic "enfant terrible" of Italian fashion who once designed a ball gown made of garbage bags, saying the gown's message was "fashion is trash," died Sunday of cancer in Annone di Brianza, Italy.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2009
Visions of Paradise National Geographic, $35 Is there heaven on earth? If so, where does it exist? That essentially was the assignment that the photographers whose work is represented in this volume were given. The book is divided into three main sections: land, water and air. Everyone, of course, has their own opinion of what makes a paradise, and the photographers here are no exception. In the land section are majestic images of the open sky country of Montana but also a cozy cafe in Paris; a pair of camels in the middle of a dust storm in Mali; and sunflowers buried under winter snow in Hokkaido, Japan.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2009
Visions of Paradise National Geographic, $35 Is there heaven on earth? If so, where does it exist? That essentially was the assignment that the photographers whose work is represented in this volume were given. The book is divided into three main sections: land, water and air. Everyone, of course, has their own opinion of what makes a paradise, and the photographers here are no exception. In the land section are majestic images of the open sky country of Montana but also a cozy cafe in Paris; a pair of camels in the middle of a dust storm in Mali; and sunflowers buried under winter snow in Hokkaido, Japan.
SPORTS
By John Husar and John Husar,Chicago Tribune | November 25, 1990
EKALAKA, Mont. -- My good and sensitive friend, Neil Oldridge, had warned that I would come to Carter County for antelope and mule deer, but leave with much more."
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2008
Frommer's/Wiley, $19.99 We shouldn't take the world for granted. That's the lesson gleaned from this book. Unfortunately, there are hundreds of places around the globe that are in dire straits or in danger of disappearing. The editors have assembled a daunting list of cultural, natural and historic sites that are under threat. Many of the places are well-known, such as the Everglades, which, according to the book, have lost 50 percent of their land because of agricultural and urban development, and the Grand Canyon, which is facing the risk of stream and groundwater contamination from cyanide and other chemicals.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | April 12, 2009
Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen arrived on this isolated South Pacific island on Easter Day in 1722 and gave the island its name, but Polynesians had already been living there for more than 1,000 years. It is a territory of Chile, which lies 2,000 miles to the east. While the island has only a few thousand residents year round, it draws tens of thousands of tourists each year who come to see its mysterious monuments. 1 Roam Rano Raraku : This volcanic crater in the Rapa Nui National Park was, for 500 years, a quarry from which the island's inhabitants dug the boulders that they used to make the mysterious sculptures called Moai.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 7, 1991
TUCUME, Peru -- A giant sting ray haunts the sacred mountain, and witch doctors high on hallucinogens reign.Spirits move as shadows in the night. A curse is cast; a deadrooster is hung from a pole, and a dog is slaughtered.Buzzards circle overhead. The heat is punishing. The place is called El Purgatorio, and it's just outside this impoverished village of dirt streets and adobe shacks.Thor Heyerdahl has come to unlock its secrets. Tanned, fit, white hair neatly combed and blue eyes clear and direct, the Norwegian explorer, 76,, who was made famous by his Kon-Tiki voyage 44 years ago, has calmed the spirits and befriended the witch doctors in an effort to excavate the largest complex of pyramids in the Americas.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
On an earlier Easter Sunday -- April 5, 1722 -- a Dutch sea captain, Jacob Roggeveen, landed on an isolated island in the South Pacific, 2,300 miles from Chile and about the size of Washington, D.C. He called his find Easter Island, and it has been a source of fascination ever since because of its giant stone statues from long ago. Its orginal inhabitants were thought to be Polynesian, and it is known as Rapa Nui in that language. The stone monoliths can be as tall as 60 feet but average about 13 feet and weigh 14 tons.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2008
Frommer's/Wiley, $19.99 We shouldn't take the world for granted. That's the lesson gleaned from this book. Unfortunately, there are hundreds of places around the globe that are in dire straits or in danger of disappearing. The editors have assembled a daunting list of cultural, natural and historic sites that are under threat. Many of the places are well-known, such as the Everglades, which, according to the book, have lost 50 percent of their land because of agricultural and urban development, and the Grand Canyon, which is facing the risk of stream and groundwater contamination from cyanide and other chemicals.
TRAVEL
By Fred J. Eckert and Fred J. Eckert,Universal Press Syndicate | June 11, 2000
It is the land of those mysterious stone giants. That's pretty much all I knew about Easter Island. That's practically all most of us know about it -- vague impressions that we have formed from the images that we have seen of those strange stone statues known as "moai." It is a very different place from what I expected. "That's a pretty scene, isn't it? Those horses out in the field," my guide, Yan Araki, remarked as we headed toward a spot called Ahu Akivi. Yan is a British-educated 28-year-old son of a Chilean doctor father and an Easter Island mother.
NEWS
September 21, 1994
Francis Maziere, 70, one of France's foremost explorers and the author of a best-selling book on Easter Island, died Sunday in Paris. He traveled to Easter Island in the Pacific in 1963, hoping to shed light on the origin of the island's giant statues. His book about that trek, "Fantastic Easter Island," sold nearly 1 million copies.Franco Moschino, 44, the ironic "enfant terrible" of Italian fashion who once designed a ball gown made of garbage bags, saying the gown's message was "fashion is trash," died Sunday of cancer in Annone di Brianza, Italy.
SPORTS
By John Husar and John Husar,Chicago Tribune | November 25, 1990
EKALAKA, Mont. -- My good and sensitive friend, Neil Oldridge, had warned that I would come to Carter County for antelope and mule deer, but leave with much more."
TRAVEL
June 24, 2007
10 FOR THE ROAD Roaming with Rover The best cities in the United States and Canada to take your dog, from DogFriendly.com: 1. Boston 2. Vancouver, British Columbia 3. New York City 4. San Francisco 5. Austin, Texas 6. Portland, Ore. 7. Northern Virginia (Alexandria, etc.) 8. Orlando, Fla. 9. San Diego 10. Dallas / Fort Worth WORLD Polls close July 6 for seven wonders The Great Wall, the Colosseum and Machu Picchu are among the leading contenders to be the new seven wonders of the world as a huge poll enters its final month with votes already cast by more than 50 million people, organizers say. As the July 6 voting deadline approaches, the rankings can still change.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | February 25, 1991
The evening of dances presented by New York choreographers and performers Art Bridgman and Myrna Packer at the Baltimore Museum of Art this weekend was a plodding and uneven adventure. Part of the difficulty was in the long inexplicable pauses between the dances; the other problem was with the weight of the works themselves.Ms. Packer and Mr. Bridgman are conceptual artists. Their dances are more attuned to the cerebral than to the physical. Their dancing is low-key and restrained, as if their bodies were constantly filtering and censoring their brain signals.
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