Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEast Wall
IN THE NEWS

East Wall

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Managers of Baltimore's Lyric Opera House plan to begin construction this summer on a multimillion-dollar expansion and modernization of its backstage area - part of an effort to make the 1894 theater more capable of accommodating elaborate, large-scale productions. Architect Jonathan Fishman of RCG Inc. presented revised plans for the project Thursday to the city's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel. The latest design is a scaled-back version of previous plans. Sandy Richmond, executive director of the nonprofit Lyric Foundation that owns the building, said he did not have a cost estimate for the latest design.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Managers of Baltimore's Lyric Opera House plan to begin construction this summer on a multimillion-dollar expansion and modernization of its backstage area - part of an effort to make the 1894 theater more capable of accommodating elaborate, large-scale productions. Architect Jonathan Fishman of RCG Inc. presented revised plans for the project Thursday to the city's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel. The latest design is a scaled-back version of previous plans. Sandy Richmond, executive director of the nonprofit Lyric Foundation that owns the building, said he did not have a cost estimate for the latest design.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | March 29, 1991
The owners of the Lyric Opera House have backed away from plans to tear out its east wall as part of a backstage expansion, but they still plan to invest approximately $2 million in improvements.H. Mebane Turner, president of the University of Baltimore and head of the non-profit group that controls the Lyric Foundation, told members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel earlier this month that foundation directors now hope to preserve and repair the theater's east wall, the only side of the 1894 landmark that hasn't been covered over by a multi-phase renovation that was launched in the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
When Bill Borner and his partner decided to sell their Harford County home and move to the city, they discovered that housing prices could be steep in many of Baltimore's choice neighborhoods. Realizing that Bolton Hill was beyond their price range, they headed south of the harbor and never looked back. Randall Street fronts Riverside Park just south of Federal Hill. It was here, in November 2002, that the men found a two-story, red brick rowhouse, circa 1900, and paid $239,000 for the renovated property.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
When Bill Borner and his partner decided to sell their Harford County home and move to the city, they discovered that housing prices could be steep in many of Baltimore's choice neighborhoods. Realizing that Bolton Hill was beyond their price range, they headed south of the harbor and never looked back. Randall Street fronts Riverside Park just south of Federal Hill. It was here, in November 2002, that the men found a two-story, red brick rowhouse, circa 1900, and paid $239,000 for the renovated property.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
When Kerry Jones paid $260,000 for his Federal Hill townhouse in March 2003, he wasn't entirely sure he was getting a bargain. Nevertheless, he remained optimistic. "I saw that the house had potential in its raw form," says Jones, a 38-year-old executive director for Erickson Retirement Community in Silver Spring. "There was character. ... I just had to find ways to bring it out." Jones hired an architect and spent about $120,000 improving the three-story home built in 1901. The upgrades to his "diamond in the rough" include pine wood flooring, a powder room addition and renovating two full bathrooms and the kitchen.
FEATURES
April 28, 1993
Wyland, an artist who has painted more than 30 murals of whales in American cities, came to Baltimore yesterday to announce plans to paint a mural here this summer.Wyland, 36, who calls his murals Whaling Walls, said he will paint the east wall of the Lee Electric Co. of Baltimore at Hamburg and Russell streets. The wall faces Russell Street near Oriole Park at Camden Yards.He will paint the wall as part of an East Coast tour to paint walls in 15 states and the District of Columbia beginning June 1. Prior to this, his murals have been executed primarily on the West Coast and in Hawaii.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
In the Harford County development of Stone Ridge, Wayne and Mollie Goddard's home is graced with stately white columns, Palladian windows and a portico. Occupying a corner lot, the two-story Georgian home has 4,100 square feet. It had one flaw two years ago when the couple bought the home for $429,000. "We bought a white house," says Mollie Goddard, referring to the interior. "And I hate white." The couple knew what had to be done. They spent an estimated $20,000 on paint, woodworking, molding, fabric and landscaping.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2004
In south Baltimore, West Street runs perpendicular to South Charles Street. At the crossroads there, depending on the direction taken, a traveler will be on West West Street or East West Street. "You [have to] have a sense of humor about your address when you live on this street," says Peggi Powell, a 15-year resident. "I've asked people not to laugh when I give it out, but they do anyway." Life on this street is pretty good these days, though, as homeowners smile at the recent renovation of the old Holy Cross School, where condominiums are selling for up to $600,000.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | December 23, 1990
The next big architectural controversy in the University of Baltimore area is likely to be the $2 million expansion proposed for the Lyric Opera House, the 1894 landmark that is owned by the Lyric Foundation, a non-profit group controlled by the University of Baltimore Education Foundation. University of Baltimore President H. Mebane Turner is chairman of its executive committee.Plans drawn up more than a year ago by Richter Cornbrooks Gribble Inc. of Baltimore call for the theater's east wall -- along Maryland Avenue -- to be knocked out so the backstage area can be expanded, enabling the Lyric to accommodate operas and Broadway-style shows that require larger and more complicated scenery.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2004
Brandi and Jeff Tomhave moved into a rehabilitated three-story townhouse in Southwest Baltimore five years ago and it quickly became their dream home. The narrow, red-brick house, circa 1850, sits on McHenry Street in a neighborhood historically known as Pigtown. That name dates to the 1800s when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad would release pigs from livestock cars and herd them through neighborhood streets en route to area slaughterhouses. City officials have renamed the area Washington Village.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
When Kerry Jones paid $260,000 for his Federal Hill townhouse in March 2003, he wasn't entirely sure he was getting a bargain. Nevertheless, he remained optimistic. "I saw that the house had potential in its raw form," says Jones, a 38-year-old executive director for Erickson Retirement Community in Silver Spring. "There was character. ... I just had to find ways to bring it out." Jones hired an architect and spent about $120,000 improving the three-story home built in 1901. The upgrades to his "diamond in the rough" include pine wood flooring, a powder room addition and renovating two full bathrooms and the kitchen.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
In the Harford County development of Stone Ridge, Wayne and Mollie Goddard's home is graced with stately white columns, Palladian windows and a portico. Occupying a corner lot, the two-story Georgian home has 4,100 square feet. It had one flaw two years ago when the couple bought the home for $429,000. "We bought a white house," says Mollie Goddard, referring to the interior. "And I hate white." The couple knew what had to be done. They spent an estimated $20,000 on paint, woodworking, molding, fabric and landscaping.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2004
In south Baltimore, West Street runs perpendicular to South Charles Street. At the crossroads there, depending on the direction taken, a traveler will be on West West Street or East West Street. "You [have to] have a sense of humor about your address when you live on this street," says Peggi Powell, a 15-year resident. "I've asked people not to laugh when I give it out, but they do anyway." Life on this street is pretty good these days, though, as homeowners smile at the recent renovation of the old Holy Cross School, where condominiums are selling for up to $600,000.
FEATURES
April 28, 1993
Wyland, an artist who has painted more than 30 murals of whales in American cities, came to Baltimore yesterday to announce plans to paint a mural here this summer.Wyland, 36, who calls his murals Whaling Walls, said he will paint the east wall of the Lee Electric Co. of Baltimore at Hamburg and Russell streets. The wall faces Russell Street near Oriole Park at Camden Yards.He will paint the wall as part of an East Coast tour to paint walls in 15 states and the District of Columbia beginning June 1. Prior to this, his murals have been executed primarily on the West Coast and in Hawaii.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | March 29, 1991
The owners of the Lyric Opera House have backed away from plans to tear out its east wall as part of a backstage expansion, but they still plan to invest approximately $2 million in improvements.H. Mebane Turner, president of the University of Baltimore and head of the non-profit group that controls the Lyric Foundation, told members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel earlier this month that foundation directors now hope to preserve and repair the theater's east wall, the only side of the 1894 landmark that hasn't been covered over by a multi-phase renovation that was launched in the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2004
Brandi and Jeff Tomhave moved into a rehabilitated three-story townhouse in Southwest Baltimore five years ago and it quickly became their dream home. The narrow, red-brick house, circa 1850, sits on McHenry Street in a neighborhood historically known as Pigtown. That name dates to the 1800s when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad would release pigs from livestock cars and herd them through neighborhood streets en route to area slaughterhouses. City officials have renamed the area Washington Village.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | December 23, 1990
The next big architectural controversy in the University of Baltimore area is likely to be the $2 million expansion proposed for the Lyric Opera House, the 1894 landmark that is owned by the Lyric Foundation, a non-profit group controlled by the University of Baltimore Education Foundation. University of Baltimore President H. Mebane Turner is chairman of its executive committee.Plans drawn up more than a year ago by Richter Cornbrooks Gribble Inc. of Baltimore call for the theater's east wall -- along Maryland Avenue -- to be knocked out so the backstage area can be expanded, enabling the Lyric to accommodate operas and Broadway-style shows that require larger and more complicated scenery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.