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By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Securities and Exchange Commission alleged yesterday that four Connecticut residents illegally traded on inside information about a pending research agreement between Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. and Merck & Co. Inc.According to the SEC, Robert J. Young of Old Saybrook learned in June 1991 that Merck and MedImmune were considering a joint venture to develop a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus, the SEC alleged. Merck, based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., is one of the nation's largest drug manufacturers.
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NEWS
April 15, 1997
Michael Dorris,52, an adoptive parent of children with fetal alcohol syndrome and author of a prize-winning book on the subject, died Thursday or Friday in Concord, N.H., a family friend said.The Concord Monitor reported that Mr. Dorris was found Friday in a Concord motel room. Police said the death appeared to have been a suicide. The newspaper said he apparently suffocated himself using a plastic bag.Mr. Dorris won a National Book Critics Circle award in 1989 in the nonfiction category for "The Broken Cord," a first-person account of how fetal alcohol syndrome affected his eldest son, Abel, who died.
NEWS
May 21, 2007
Dena Love Raitzyk, a commercial artist in Randallstown, died of lung cancer Saturday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 46. Dena Love was born and raised in the Baltimore area and graduated from Randallstown High School in 1979. She then attended the Maryland Institute College of Art, studying graphic arts. While at MICA she met Neil Raitzyk, and the couple married June 27, 1982. Mrs. Raitzyk left school to work in Baltimore for Williams & Wilkins, a Philadelphia-based publisher of specialized media for the health professions.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
Maryland's Assateague Island has made a University of Maryland geologist's list of the top 10 beaches in the Northeastern United States -- but just barely.Thanks mainly to its clean water and wild isolation, the Assateague Island National Seashore ranked 10th on the list compiled by Stephen Leatherman, director of UM's Laboratory for Coastal Research and an internationally recognized expert on coastal erosion and geology.Assateague was outclassed by beaches at East Hampton (first) and Westhampton Beach (second)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Russell J. White, a retired trial attorney who won an acquittal in a nationally watched case in 1980 in which his client was accused of shooting boys throwing snowballs at his house, died of complications from dementia Wednesday at the Heart Home in Lutherville. The Mays Chapel North resident was 85. "He had a gift that can't be taught in a school. Russ had a wonderful way with juries," said his former law partner, Joseph F. Murphy, who went on to become chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
Longtime educator slain in apparent murder-suicide Earl Jacob Lightcap, 75, a longtime principal of Edgewood High School and former assistant superintendent of Harford County schools, was found slain at his home in Long Bar Harbor on Tuesday, police said. Police suspect that David Allen Johnston, 22, was the killer, said Harford sheriff's spokesman Edward Hopkins. Johnston was found dead in the Bush River on Wednesday with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his head. A rifle -- thought to be one missing from Lightcap's house -- was found in the river off Long Bar Harbor, Hopkins said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 16, 2003
For 20 years after his military service in Vietnam ended in 1968, Morgan Monceaux roamed the country working odd jobs -- short-order cook, gas-station attendant, janitor. When he got bored, he'd pick up and move to the next place. He wandered from Washing-ton state to Florida and to points in between. He hitched rides and slept wherever he could lay his head. He dug meals out of dumpsters; for a while he was homeless. Then in 1990, when he was 43, he began to paint. He was living in an abandoned building in the South Bronx in New York City.
NEWS
By Megan Sexton and By Megan Sexton,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 27, 2002
HIGH POINT, N.C. -- The folks at Martha Stewart Living say it happens all the time. Someone will write, call or e-mail saying she just must have the sofa or the table or the mirror pictured in the magazine. Many of those pieces are part of Stewart's own collection, filling her stone house on the Maine coast or her 19th-century home on the eastern shore of Long Island. They often are antiques or one-of-a-kind items, not available in typical furniture stores. Until now. Stewart's first venture into furniture was unveiled recently at the International Home Furnishings Market in High Point with the 175-piece Martha Stewart Signature collection by Bernhardt.
NEWS
August 16, 2002
Robert Borkenstein, 89, inventor of the Breathalyzer, died Saturday in Bloomington, Ind. A former Indiana University professor and state police captain, Mr. Borkenstein invented the portable device while working at the state police crime laboratory in 1954. The Breathalyzer measures alcohol content in a person's breath. He also was principal investigator in a 1962 study of the role of alcohol in traffic accidents that influenced the development of drunken driving laws. "If we can make life better simply by controlling alcohol, that's a very small price to pay," Mr. Borkenstein said in 1995.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
LeBaron S. Willard Jr., a retired Commercial Credit Co. executive, died Tuesday of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The longtime Cross Keys resident was 85.Mr. Willard began his career in 1940 in Boston as New England representative of the company and later returned to his native New York City. In 1963, he was promoted to vice president and moved to Baltimore, later becoming chairman of the board before retiring in 1973.Thomas McCausland, an associate at Commercial Credit, described him as "refined and gentle of manner, ever courteous and considerate of others, blessed with an easy sense of humor and ready wit."
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