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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1991
BERLIN -- "Refugee, yes, but no peace," is how Said Kahn describes his situation in Germany. Since arriving four months ago from India, he stands a good chance of being officially accepted as a refugee but so far has not managed to escape the threat of violence that led him to flee his native Punjab province.As a political activist there, the 30-year-old Mr. Kahn had good reason to fear becoming a victim of the harsh treatment frequently meted out to critics of the central government by army troops.
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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Helga "Lollo" Lieselotte Pennewell, who escaped Soviet-occupied East Germany with her family for Maryland's Eastern Shore, where she spent 52 years as an educator and nationally acclaimed activist, died last week. She was 84. Ms. Pennewell was born to Alfred and Elsa Dallmann in Muhlhausen, Thuringia, Germany, on April 1, 1929. As a teenager, she qualified for Germany's Olympic swim team but never competed because the 1944 Games were canceled because of World War II. Ms. Pennewell attended Staatliche Oberschuk, a college in her hometown, where she earned the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in design and dressmaking.
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2001
Katherine M. Lerch, who moved to Baltimore half a century ago after escaping from Russian-occupied East Germany, died at Union Memorial Hospital on Friday from complications of a heart attack. She was 74. Mrs. Lerch, a Catonsville resident and longtime department store employee, spoke four languages: Hungarian, German, Russian and English. For many years, she was a sales clerk and department manager for downtown department stores, including Hutzler's and Hecht Co. She worked for the Hecht Co. for 26 years before retiring in 1990.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Werner H. Fornos, who fled post-World War II Germany as a teen and became an advocate for global population control after serving in the Maryland House of Delegates, died of diabetic complications Jan. 16 at his home in Basye, Va. The former Davidsonville resident was 79. Born Werner Horst Farenhold in Leipzig, Germany, he was separated from his family during the World War II during Allied bombing when the apartment building where the family lived...
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | March 19, 1991
BERLIN -- Driving through Berlin one foggy night in search of a gallery in the western part of the city, Gerd Waskoviak began to get uneasy. The signs were unreadable and the buildings only shadows, but there was no mistaking where he was. A quick sniff and he knew he had strayed into the east."
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1990
BERLIN -- The price of German unity was pushed another notch higher yesterday when West Germany agreed that the Soviet Union would receive $8 billion for the withdrawal of its 365,000 troops in East Germany.The agreement, one of the last hurdles to Soviet approval of German unification, was confirmed after weeks of haggling over the price tag. The Soviets had asked for nearly twice the amount, saying it was necessary for transportation, rehousing and reintegration of the troops, who will leave over the next four years.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | August 18, 1993
BERLIN -- In reunified Germany, those who survive the past seem doomed to repeat it, and prominent figures are hunkered down in fear of a witch hunt following reports of a list of 2,000 East German "moles."Although not a single page of the mysterious Communist spy roster has been published, warnings of a German-style McCarthyism have politicians, journalists, scientists and business leaders running for cover.Unsubstantiated rumor has long been a tool of politicians, but in the supercharged crisis atmosphere of a Germany reeling from economic stagnation and neo-Nazi violence, a revisiting of the Communist era strikes fear across party lines.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | April 17, 1994
BERLIN -- As the creaky old Communist regime of East Germany vanished into history in 1990, billions of dollars in state money vanished with it, presumably ending up in locked suitcases and mysterious foreign bank accounts.Now, four years after German officials began searching for the money, they're offering rewards of up to $3 million to anyone who can put them on a fresh trail to the missing riches.The officials made their appeal recently with large advertisements in more than 30 German newspapers and magazines, mostly in the five states of the former East Germany.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
BONN, Germany -- It did not end the way cloak-and-dagger stories are supposed to, with briefcases exchanged on foggy bridges, or midnight dashes across nameless borders.Instead, one of the most thrilling chapters in Cold War espionage closed with a German nursery rhyme sung by a lonely, drunken spy:"All my little duckies, swimming on the pond . . . heads deep in water, tails to the sky."The bizarre shortwave broadcast from East Germany to its legion of spies around the globe that evening last May 23 hid a sobering message.
FEATURES
By Patricia O'Haire and Patricia O'Haire,New York Daily News | October 11, 1990
"You know, my grandfather was originally from Russia," the tall, distinguished-looking man said. "I think if he had just taken that extra step, and come to America, he could have been a Sam Krichinsky, instead of having his grandson playing him."Playing him was all right, though," he said after a pause.The tall, distinguished-looking man is Armin Mueller-Stahl, and he's in the new movie "Avalon," which opened Friday to wonderful reviews that seem equally divided between him and the film itself.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 12, 2010
Frank Warner Kussy, a Holocaust survivor who won reparations for damages done to him and his business by both the Nazis and the communist government of East Germany, died of heart failure Oct. 1, less than two weeks short of his 100th birthday. "He was probably unique, in that he fought the German government double-time," said Kenneth Waltzer, director of Jewish Studies at James Madison College at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., who invited Mr. Kussy to speak to his class several times.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 28, 2007
No one puts more burdens on movie artists than Americans do. We coerce them into an increasingly pressurized system that rewards only commercial success - and determines that success on a film's box-office take in a single weekend. Critics urge them to be topical, yet not at the expense of art, and want directors to be "experimental," even if that limits popular support. The Holy Grail for American moviemakers - producing a movie that unites every portion of the audience, such as The Godfather or The Right Stuff - seems to recede into the mist as viewership grows more fragmented and "niche-oriented" with every passing season.
NEWS
By Harry J. Gilmore | November 9, 2004
FIFTEEN YEARS ago today, determined throngs of East Berliners breached the Berlin Wall, and the United States and its allies helped facilitate the safe movement of Berliners through the wall that historic night. This story is being told for American readers for the first time. With the defeat of the Nazi regime, the victorious Allies divided Germany and Berlin into four zones (sectors, in the case of Berlin). The victors were unable to agree on Germany's future, and two German states were created, the Federal Republic of Germany in the west and the German Democratic Republic in the east.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 30, 2003
It's safe to say that the big Gerhard Richter retrospective at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington will be one of the most important shows in our region this year. Not the most beautiful or the most popular, perhaps (though it's extremely good-looking), but significant because of what it suggests about the place painting occupies in contemporary culture. That Richter is an incredibly versatile artist is beyond doubt. He can paint with the luminous delicacy of Vermeer, as in the lovely 1994 portrait of his wife, Reader, and his 1992 Flowers, or with the deadpan muteness of Warhol, as in Mustang Squadron (1964)
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2001
Katherine M. Lerch, who moved to Baltimore half a century ago after escaping from Russian-occupied East Germany, died at Union Memorial Hospital on Friday from complications of a heart attack. She was 74. Mrs. Lerch, a Catonsville resident and longtime department store employee, spoke four languages: Hungarian, German, Russian and English. For many years, she was a sales clerk and department manager for downtown department stores, including Hutzler's and Hecht Co. She worked for the Hecht Co. for 26 years before retiring in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
"Too Far Afield," by Gunter Grass. Harcourt. 658 pages. $30. The Nobel Prize awarded last year to Gunter Grass seems one of the better literary decisions of those Swedish Academicians. From "The Tin Drum" on, his novels have been meditations on his native Germany, cast in a mode somewhere between symbolism and allegory. Like Germany itself, he prefers other things to realism. Grass always takes an idea and spreads a generous amount of prose on it. This time it's German reunification -- a topic on which he surely should be worth reading.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Helga "Lollo" Lieselotte Pennewell, who escaped Soviet-occupied East Germany with her family for Maryland's Eastern Shore, where she spent 52 years as an educator and nationally acclaimed activist, died last week. She was 84. Ms. Pennewell was born to Alfred and Elsa Dallmann in Muhlhausen, Thuringia, Germany, on April 1, 1929. As a teenager, she qualified for Germany's Olympic swim team but never competed because the 1944 Games were canceled because of World War II. Ms. Pennewell attended Staatliche Oberschuk, a college in her hometown, where she earned the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in design and dressmaking.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | January 13, 1993
BERLIN -- The trial of former East German Communist leader Erich Honecker ended last night with neither a bang nor a whimper but only a sad, grave sigh of mercy for the dying former dictator.Mr. Honecker was accused in the deaths of 13 people killed at the Berlin Wall as they tried to escape his regime.The Berlin Supreme Court declared yesterday that the trial of Mr. Honecker, who is 80 years old and ailing, violated constitutional protections of his "human dignity." They then told the criminal court to reconsider its imprisonment order.
NEWS
By Gwynne Dyer | August 31, 2000
LONDON -- "What are you doing here in Germany," asked the three drunken youths when they ran into Alberto Adriano in Dessau one Saturday night in June. "I live here," Adriano might have replied. But he didn't get the chance. The three were still rhythmically kicking and stamping on his head with their steel-capped boots and chanting "Get out of our country, you ... pig" when the police pulled up and arrested them. Adriano was born in Mozambique, but he came to what was then East Germany in his early 20s and had lived and worked in Dessau nearly half his life.
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