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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1997
QUOGUE, N.Y. - A conservationist and a land developer who set aside their differences to help preserve the Long Island Pine Barrens have announced plans for a similar effort to preserve open space on the island's East End.They warned that the bull market on Wall Street was feeding a real estate frenzy in the Hamptons, where undeveloped farmland, they said, was selling for as much as $200,000 an acre.Richard L. Amper Jr., who helped negotiate the Pine Barrens Protection Act, and Edwin M. Schwenk, who represented the Long Island Builders Institute, will co-direct an organization called East End Forever, which will try to duplicate their success on the North and South Forks and Shelter Island.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | September 16, 2007
The sun rises this week at the east end of Baltimore's original east-west street grid. If the streets pointed due east, this would occur on Sept. 23 - the autumnal equinox. But "street corner astronomer" Herman Heyn says early surveyors, using magnetic north instead of true north, skewed the grid 3 degrees counterclockwise. So our street-canyon sunrises are early - Sept. 18-19 - and sunsets are late - Sept. 29-30. Either is a blinding nuisance for downtown drivers, but an opportunity for shutterbugs.
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FEATURES
By BETTY LOWRY and BETTY LOWRY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
Bermuda can be a puzzle. For more than 350 years the linked island chain has been under one flag, yet its history records major social and political diversity -- not so much between neighbors but between its geographic end points.They say your attitude begins to change as you travel east and cross the world's smallest drawbridge (22 inches wide, just enough to permit passage of a sailboat mast) between Somerset Island and Southampton Parish. As for residents, although East Enders and West Enders occasionally rub shoulders in central Hamilton, only taxi drivers appear to make the tip-to-tip journey very often.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
Lucille Gorham has watched firsthand for decades as her East Baltimore neighborhood has deteriorated since her family moved there in 1931. The blocks around Gorham's East Chase Street house have gone from a family neighborhood with clean stoops and streets to a trash-strewn stretch of boarded-up houses inhabited by addicts and drug dealers. Now Gorham, 72, is moving out to make way for the wrecking balls and construction cranes that will begin the transformation of her dilapidated neighborhood into new townhouses and high-tech businesses as part of a redevelopment project officially kicked off yesterday.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | September 16, 2007
The sun rises this week at the east end of Baltimore's original east-west street grid. If the streets pointed due east, this would occur on Sept. 23 - the autumnal equinox. But "street corner astronomer" Herman Heyn says early surveyors, using magnetic north instead of true north, skewed the grid 3 degrees counterclockwise. So our street-canyon sunrises are early - Sept. 18-19 - and sunsets are late - Sept. 29-30. Either is a blinding nuisance for downtown drivers, but an opportunity for shutterbugs.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1995
LONDON -- The streets of the East End were filling with kids and grandparents, shoppers and photographers, all following the six black-plumed horses, the Victorian glass hearse awash with flowers and the 27 Daimler limousines on a final journey from funeral home to church.Yesterday, Ronnie Kray -- mobster, murderer, paranoid schizophrenic -- was given a funeral fit for a king.For a few hours, it was just like the 1960s, when Ronnie and his twin brother, Reggie, ruled the East End underworld and became folk heroes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 14, 1993
Canadian playwright George F. Walker doesn't need to do any special research when he writes about the urban working class, as he does in "Escape From Happiness," which is receiving its first major U.S. production at Center Stage."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Leonard P. Berger, the pugnacious developer who once wanted to transform his woodlands and fields on the Chesapeake Bay into the "Harborplace of Baltimore County," has a more modest proposal for a few hundred homes.But before the first blueprint is unfurled, Berger faces not only a dizzying array of environmental and zoning hurdles but also challenges from skeptical property owners and at least one key politician."There's no way that land will be developed, no way," said Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, an Essex Democrat.
NEWS
By Peter C. Beller and Peter C. Beller,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2003
SHELTER ISLAND, N.Y. -- The who and why remain a mystery, but what is known for certain is that the skeletal remains of at least five people, most likely American Indians, buried in a communal grave more than a century ago, were uncovered recently by a homeowner here. "I wasn't exactly sure, exactly what I had," said Walter Richards, 29, a Shelter Island police officer who uncovered the grave site recently while excavating next to his new house on this 8,000-acre island 95 miles east of New York City on the East End of Long Island.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2003
CONSTANTA, Romania - Kurt Sanger is only a captain, and so he will leave to higher-ups the question of whether Romania would make a good ally, as the United States sets about a historic reordering of its military alliances from its old friends in Western Europe to new ones in the east. He does, however, have some thoughts about Romania as a place where American soldiers like him, perhaps soon, might find a new home. "Paradise isn't too strong a word," said Sanger, 31, a U.S. Marine reservist.
NEWS
By Peter C. Beller and Peter C. Beller,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2003
SHELTER ISLAND, N.Y. -- The who and why remain a mystery, but what is known for certain is that the skeletal remains of at least five people, most likely American Indians, buried in a communal grave more than a century ago, were uncovered recently by a homeowner here. "I wasn't exactly sure, exactly what I had," said Walter Richards, 29, a Shelter Island police officer who uncovered the grave site recently while excavating next to his new house on this 8,000-acre island 95 miles east of New York City on the East End of Long Island.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2003
CONSTANTA, Romania - Kurt Sanger is only a captain, and so he will leave to higher-ups the question of whether Romania would make a good ally, as the United States sets about a historic reordering of its military alliances from its old friends in Western Europe to new ones in the east. He does, however, have some thoughts about Romania as a place where American soldiers like him, perhaps soon, might find a new home. "Paradise isn't too strong a word," said Sanger, 31, a U.S. Marine reservist.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- And now there is no Duke. A top seed took another U-turn in the wacky NCAA basketball tournament last night when fifth-seeded Florida sent home the nation's No. 1 team by scoring the final 13 points to eliminate the Blue Devils, 87-78, in the East Regional semifinals at the Carrier Dome. The outcome broke a string of six consecutive regional titles for Duke (29-5), which had reached the Final Four from the East every time it appeared here since 1986 -- a streak of 26 games.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Leonard P. Berger, the pugnacious developer who once wanted to transform his woodlands and fields on the Chesapeake Bay into the "Harborplace of Baltimore County," has a more modest proposal for a few hundred homes.But before the first blueprint is unfurled, Berger faces not only a dizzying array of environmental and zoning hurdles but also challenges from skeptical property owners and at least one key politician."There's no way that land will be developed, no way," said Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, an Essex Democrat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1997
QUOGUE, N.Y. - A conservationist and a land developer who set aside their differences to help preserve the Long Island Pine Barrens have announced plans for a similar effort to preserve open space on the island's East End.They warned that the bull market on Wall Street was feeding a real estate frenzy in the Hamptons, where undeveloped farmland, they said, was selling for as much as $200,000 an acre.Richard L. Amper Jr., who helped negotiate the Pine Barrens Protection Act, and Edwin M. Schwenk, who represented the Long Island Builders Institute, will co-direct an organization called East End Forever, which will try to duplicate their success on the North and South Forks and Shelter Island.
FEATURES
By BETTY LOWRY and BETTY LOWRY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
Bermuda can be a puzzle. For more than 350 years the linked island chain has been under one flag, yet its history records major social and political diversity -- not so much between neighbors but between its geographic end points.They say your attitude begins to change as you travel east and cross the world's smallest drawbridge (22 inches wide, just enough to permit passage of a sailboat mast) between Somerset Island and Southampton Parish. As for residents, although East Enders and West Enders occasionally rub shoulders in central Hamilton, only taxi drivers appear to make the tip-to-tip journey very often.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
The heads of Cowan Enterprises Inc. and Port East Transfer Inc. said yesterday they have ended merger talks aimed at creating a big, publicly owned, Baltimore-based transportation company.Edwin F. Hale, owner of Port East Transfer, said the deal collapsed when the two sides could not resolve tax liabilities that would have resulted from spinning off one of Cowan's operations."It was a very complex deal," said Mr. Hale, who categorized the negotiations as amicable.The merger would have created a trucking, barging and warehousing operation generating annual revenues of about $100 million.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
It was the way they lost that bothered Wilde Lake's Katie Troutman."I don't think we played with the same intensity that got us here," she said.Wilde Lake's field hockey team won three playoff games to reach yesterday's class 2A state semifinal game against North East of Cecil County.Three straight victories after a winless regular season.NB Yesterday, the magical playoff tour ended as North East scoredin the first two minutes and went on to a 3-0 victory at Goucher College. North East will play Bethesday-Chevy Chase Saturday for the title.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
More than five years have passed since a private developer last began construction of an office building overlooking Baltimore's Inner Harbor.But the dry spell will end officially at 11 a.m. tomorrow, when Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and other dignitaries break ground for a $32 million office and residential complex that will be the headquarters for Sylvan Learning Systems, now based in Columbia.The project occupies a block bounded by Central Avenue and Lancaster, Aliceanna and Exeter streets -- part of Baltimore's federally designated empowerment zone.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
It was the way they lost that bothered Wilde Lake's Katie Troutman."I don't think we played with the same intensity that got us here," she said.Wilde Lake's field hockey team won three playoff games to reach yesterday's class 2A state semifinal game against North East of Cecil County.Three straight victories after a winless regular season.NB Yesterday, the magical playoff tour ended as North East scoredin the first two minutes and went on to a 3-0 victory at Goucher College. North East will play Bethesday-Chevy Chase Saturday for the title.
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