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NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
"This grand show," naturalist John Muir once wrote about his beloved vistas, "is eternal." Next week, biking, hiking and wildlife aficionados will salute an East Coast version of Muir's grand show that, while not quite eternal, stretches from Maine to Key West, Fla., with Harford County's famed waterfront and trail system nestled near its heart. The East Coast Greenway, a 12-year-old national effort, attempts to stitch together a 2,600-mile trail system from abandoned railroad corridors, canal towpaths and existing trails that shadows the Interstate 95 corridor.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
Representatives of Baltimore's biking and hiking community gathered Saturday for a "state of the trails" summit to set a course for creating more opportunities for recreational users and commuters. Despite a sluggish economy and a tight budget, the city is continuing work on several projects, said Fran Spero, an official with Baltimore's Recreation and Parks Department. Extending the Jones Falls Trail 2.5 miles from the Inner Harbor to Pennsylvania Station continues on time, as does planning for the $5.9 million segment that will connect Cylburn Arboretum to Mount Washington.
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FEATURES
By Morgan Bitton and Morgan Bitton,COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
Imagine jogging from New York City to Key West, Fla., on a scenic coastal path, without gas, without cars, without tolls.Assuming your legs can hold out, you may soon be able to run, walk, skate or bicycle on a 2,000-mile trail known as the East Coast Greenway, a recreational trail along the East Coast. It was begun in 1991, and portions of the trail have already opened in Maine, Massachusetts and Connecticut.When the path is complete, it will connect cities including Boston, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston and Miami.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
About 16 months from now, bicyclists will be able to ride from the Inner Harbor to Pennsylvania Station on a smooth path all their own. Little by little, crews working in the shadow of the Jones Falls Expressway are inching their way north, building a concrete and belgian-block median to separate four-wheel traffic from the two-wheel variety. The $3.5 million, state-funded segment of the Jones Falls Trail will start at Lee Street near the Baltimore Visitor Center, wrap around the Inner Harbor and follow the Fallsway to the train station.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
March 9, 1887, ushered in a Short Line railroad service that many people wish were still around, connecting Annapolis to Baltimore. Maryland's state capital and its largest city were first linked by a 6:40 a.m. train carrying 25 passengers, which left Annapolis for Baltimore and arrived at 8 a.m. The zippy thrill of that first ride was not completely conveyed in newspaper reports. But one historian, Elihu S. Riley, noted, "There was a number of citizens out to give the venture a good send-off."
NEWS
June 20, 1996
ONE OF THE fascinating trends of recent years has been the boom in greenways. Several already exist in the Baltimore region, and other nature trails are planned to accommodate a growing number of hikers and bikers.Now comes word that the 13.3-mile Baltimore and Annapolis Trail, which runs from Glen Burnie to Severn, has been selected as one of the first designated sections of the East Coast Greenway network.Running parallel to Ritchie Highway on the bed of the old Baltimore & Annapolis Railroad tracks, this trail will be among paths recommended for use by those who want to traverse from Maine to Florida -- or points in-between -- using a 2,500-mile stretch of recreational paths.
NEWS
By Paul Longo and Paul Longo,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2002
Baltimore's reputation as a place to hike and bike promises to grow, now that the second phase of construction of the 14-mile Gwynns Falls Trail is under way. The official launch of Phase II on May 29 marked a key step in a project that supporters hope will ultimately connect a substantial trail system in the city to a greenway stretching from Maine to Florida. In addition to the Gwynns Falls Trail, which will take people from a trailhead in Leakin Park in West Baltimore to the Inner Harbor and Middle Branch Park, a second major route, following the Jones Falls from Penn Station to Robert E. Lee Park, is expected to be started in September.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
Representatives of Baltimore's biking and hiking community gathered Saturday for a "state of the trails" summit to set a course for creating more opportunities for recreational users and commuters. Despite a sluggish economy and a tight budget, the city is continuing work on several projects, said Fran Spero, an official with Baltimore's Recreation and Parks Department. Extending the Jones Falls Trail 2.5 miles from the Inner Harbor to Pennsylvania Station continues on time, as does planning for the $5.9 million segment that will connect Cylburn Arboretum to Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
About 16 months from now, bicyclists will be able to ride from the Inner Harbor to Pennsylvania Station on a smooth path all their own. Little by little, crews working in the shadow of the Jones Falls Expressway are inching their way north, building a concrete and belgian-block median to separate four-wheel traffic from the two-wheel variety. The $3.5 million, state-funded segment of the Jones Falls Trail will start at Lee Street near the Baltimore Visitor Center, wrap around the Inner Harbor and follow the Fallsway to the train station.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
The Baltimore and Annapolis Trail is going national.The 13.3-mile hiker-biker trail was selected by the East Coast Greenway Alliance as one of the first designated trail sections of the East Coast Greenway network.The honor means the trail will be part of a 2,500-mile recreational path connecting cities from Maine to Florida that could be mapped as soon as the year 2000."I think this is an important distinction," said David Dionne, park superintendent of the B&A Trail and member of the national board of directors of the East Coast Greenway Alliance.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
March 9, 1887, ushered in a Short Line railroad service that many people wish were still around, connecting Annapolis to Baltimore. Maryland's state capital and its largest city were first linked by a 6:40 a.m. train carrying 25 passengers, which left Annapolis for Baltimore and arrived at 8 a.m. The zippy thrill of that first ride was not completely conveyed in newspaper reports. But one historian, Elihu S. Riley, noted, "There was a number of citizens out to give the venture a good send-off."
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
"This grand show," naturalist John Muir once wrote about his beloved vistas, "is eternal." Next week, biking, hiking and wildlife aficionados will salute an East Coast version of Muir's grand show that, while not quite eternal, stretches from Maine to Key West, Fla., with Harford County's famed waterfront and trail system nestled near its heart. The East Coast Greenway, a 12-year-old national effort, attempts to stitch together a 2,600-mile trail system from abandoned railroad corridors, canal towpaths and existing trails that shadows the Interstate 95 corridor.
NEWS
By Paul Longo and Paul Longo,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2002
Baltimore's reputation as a place to hike and bike promises to grow, now that the second phase of construction of the 14-mile Gwynns Falls Trail is under way. The official launch of Phase II on May 29 marked a key step in a project that supporters hope will ultimately connect a substantial trail system in the city to a greenway stretching from Maine to Florida. In addition to the Gwynns Falls Trail, which will take people from a trailhead in Leakin Park in West Baltimore to the Inner Harbor and Middle Branch Park, a second major route, following the Jones Falls from Penn Station to Robert E. Lee Park, is expected to be started in September.
FEATURES
By Morgan Bitton and Morgan Bitton,COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
Imagine jogging from New York City to Key West, Fla., on a scenic coastal path, without gas, without cars, without tolls.Assuming your legs can hold out, you may soon be able to run, walk, skate or bicycle on a 2,000-mile trail known as the East Coast Greenway, a recreational trail along the East Coast. It was begun in 1991, and portions of the trail have already opened in Maine, Massachusetts and Connecticut.When the path is complete, it will connect cities including Boston, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston and Miami.
NEWS
June 20, 1996
ONE OF THE fascinating trends of recent years has been the boom in greenways. Several already exist in the Baltimore region, and other nature trails are planned to accommodate a growing number of hikers and bikers.Now comes word that the 13.3-mile Baltimore and Annapolis Trail, which runs from Glen Burnie to Severn, has been selected as one of the first designated sections of the East Coast Greenway network.Running parallel to Ritchie Highway on the bed of the old Baltimore & Annapolis Railroad tracks, this trail will be among paths recommended for use by those who want to traverse from Maine to Florida -- or points in-between -- using a 2,500-mile stretch of recreational paths.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
The Baltimore and Annapolis Trail is going national.The 13.3-mile hiker-biker trail was selected by the East Coast Greenway Alliance as one of the first designated trail sections of the East Coast Greenway network.The honor means the trail will be part of a 2,500-mile recreational path connecting cities from Maine to Florida that could be mapped as soon as the year 2000."I think this is an important distinction," said David Dionne, park superintendent of the B&A Trail and member of the national board of directors of the East Coast Greenway Alliance.
NEWS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
BALTIMORE - The Baltimore and Annapolis Trail is going national.The 13.3-mile hiker-biker trail was selected by the East Coast Greenway Alliance as one of the first designated trail sections of the East Coast Greenway network.The honor means the trail will be part of a 2,500-mile recreational path connecting metropolitan cities from Maine to Florida that could be mapped as soon as the year 2000."I think this is an important distinction," said David Dionne, park superintendent of the B&A Trail and member of the national board of directors of the East Coast Greenway Alliance.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 1999
A 42-mile trail linking Annapolis to Baltimore-Washington International Airport was named a national Millennium Legacy Trail last week, a designation that should bring increased recognition and some federal money.The Maryland trail -- a combination of the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail, the BWI Trail and Colonial Annapolis Maritime Trail -- was one of 50 pathways across the nation to be given the designation. The selections were announced in Washington by first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton."I think it's terrific for the state and this trail system in particular," said Charlie Adams, director of environmental design for the State Highway Administration.
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