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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
State university officials took an early step Friday in approving a high-end hotel and conference center that is expected to be a cornerstone of a major redevelopment plan for the University of Maryland, College Park and its surroundings. The university envisions a 300-room hotel with at least 10,000 square feet of conference space, as well as retail and restaurants, for an underused parcel of land, known as East Campus. The town of College Park has many budget hotels but lacks something more luxurious.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
The University of Maryland, College Park could look considerably different by 2020 if plans for a light rail line and a town center development on the east side of campus roll forward this year. Preliminary engineering for the $1.93 billion Purple Line, expected to run through the heart of campus, could begin this fall if federal transit officials grant permission. The initial phase of the East Campus development, which would include a hotel, restaurants and retail shops, could also come up for approval by the Board of Regents if campus leaders can reach an agreement with the Baltimore-basedCordish Cos. School officials say that, in tandem, the projects could make the campus more accessible to commuting professors and students from across the Washington suburbs and give it a more polished look commensurate with the flagship university's enhanced national standing.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
State university officials took an early step Friday in approving a high-end hotel and conference center that is expected to be a cornerstone of a major redevelopment plan for the University of Maryland, College Park and its surroundings. The university envisions a 300-room hotel with at least 10,000 square feet of conference space, as well as retail and restaurants, for an underused parcel of land, known as East Campus. The town of College Park has many budget hotels but lacks something more luxurious.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
The University of Maryland, College Park aspires to be one of the "greenest" institutions of higher education in the country and plans to celebrate Friday its designation as an arboretum and "tree campus." But some students and professors say the administration is missing the forest for the trees by planning to bulldoze nearly 9 acres of woods on the sprawling 1,400-acre campus to make way for maintenance sheds, a mail-handling depot and a parking lot for the university's buses and trucks.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 11, 2012
Harvard University has a research forest.  So does Duke.  Yale has multiple forests.  The University of Maryland has “the wooded hillock. " a 24-acre patch of trees at the northern tip of the state's flagship public campus. Though tiny, largely unheralded and perhaps a bit scruffy by comparison, the forest near the Comcast Center is brimming with biodiversity, no less valuable to the faculty and students who use it than its more heralded Ivy League counterparts. Targeted for bulldozing a few years back to provide parking for buses and other support services, the hillock was spared after months of passionate protests by students and faculty, who argued the woods were a green oasis worth preserving on the sprawling 1,400-acre flagship campus.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
The University of Maryland, College Park has begun negotiations with The Cordish Cos. to lead the redevelopment of the eastern part of the state's flagship campus, school officials said. The Baltimore-based company, which has developed projects such as the Power Plant complex at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, was selected through a request for proposals process that began in April. The approximately 38-acre, mixed-use redevelopment will include stores, eateries, entertainment and graduate student housing, which proponents hope will revitalize the area around the U.S. Route 1 corridor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2000
RUNNING OUT OF research space, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine will begin construction next week on a $140 million tower that will house more than 400 researchers and administrators and define a new gateway to the East Baltimore medical campus. Hopkins has set Monday as the date for a ceremonial groundbreaking for the building, part of a large investment in research facilities in East Baltimore and the most expensive building constructed for the medical school. Other recent capital investments by Hopkins include the $59 million Bunting-Blaustein Cancer Research Building on Orleans Street and the clinical research areas of the $125 million Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Comprehensive Cancer Center at Orleans and Broadway.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
With a quarter-of-a-billion-dollar surge of construction and renovation, Johns Hopkins is building to keep its health research and clinical facilities world-class -- and to meet the needs of a changing marketplace.Most of the activity is centered on the East Baltimore medical campus, where the biggest replacement project ever at Hopkins -- a cancer treatment center and nearby cancer research building -- is under way, at a cost of nearly $200 million.Such massive projects are becoming rarer because of the difficulties of projecting revenue from managed-care insurers, said Ronald R. Peterson, president of Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Health System.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 11, 2012
Harvard University has a research forest.  So does Duke.  Yale has multiple forests.  The University of Maryland has “the wooded hillock. " a 24-acre patch of trees at the northern tip of the state's flagship public campus. Though tiny, largely unheralded and perhaps a bit scruffy by comparison, the forest near the Comcast Center is brimming with biodiversity, no less valuable to the faculty and students who use it than its more heralded Ivy League counterparts. Targeted for bulldozing a few years back to provide parking for buses and other support services, the hillock was spared after months of passionate protests by students and faculty, who argued the woods were a green oasis worth preserving on the sprawling 1,400-acre flagship campus.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
The University of Maryland, College Park could look considerably different by 2020 if plans for a light rail line and a town center development on the east side of campus roll forward this year. Preliminary engineering for the $1.93 billion Purple Line, expected to run through the heart of campus, could begin this fall if federal transit officials grant permission. The initial phase of the East Campus development, which would include a hotel, restaurants and retail shops, could also come up for approval by the Board of Regents if campus leaders can reach an agreement with the Baltimore-basedCordish Cos. School officials say that, in tandem, the projects could make the campus more accessible to commuting professors and students from across the Washington suburbs and give it a more polished look commensurate with the flagship university's enhanced national standing.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
The University of Maryland, College Park has begun negotiations with The Cordish Cos. to lead the redevelopment of the eastern part of the state's flagship campus, school officials said. The Baltimore-based company, which has developed projects such as the Power Plant complex at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, was selected through a request for proposals process that began in April. The approximately 38-acre, mixed-use redevelopment will include stores, eateries, entertainment and graduate student housing, which proponents hope will revitalize the area around the U.S. Route 1 corridor.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
The University of Maryland, College Park aspires to be one of the "greenest" institutions of higher education in the country and plans to celebrate Friday its designation as an arboretum and "tree campus." But some students and professors say the administration is missing the forest for the trees by planning to bulldoze nearly 9 acres of woods on the sprawling 1,400-acre campus to make way for maintenance sheds, a mail-handling depot and a parking lot for the university's buses and trucks.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
Johns Hopkins Medicine will launch today one of the largest and most expensive private building campaigns in Maryland history - a $1 billion reconstruction of its 52-acre East Baltimore medical campus. If Hopkins can raise enough money, the master plan calls for the construction of 2.2 million square feet of space over the next seven to 10 years. It includes research facilities, a children's and maternal building, a cardiovascular and critical care tower, and renovation or demolition of many other structures.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2000
RUNNING OUT OF research space, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine will begin construction next week on a $140 million tower that will house more than 400 researchers and administrators and define a new gateway to the East Baltimore medical campus. Hopkins has set Monday as the date for a ceremonial groundbreaking for the building, part of a large investment in research facilities in East Baltimore and the most expensive building constructed for the medical school. Other recent capital investments by Hopkins include the $59 million Bunting-Blaustein Cancer Research Building on Orleans Street and the clinical research areas of the $125 million Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Comprehensive Cancer Center at Orleans and Broadway.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
THE JOHNS HOPKINS Medical Institutions' East Baltimore campus is expected to add two large academic buildings, costing a total of $67 million, as part of an effort by administrators to upgrade teaching and research facilities.The first project due to get under way is a $17 million School of Nursing building, planned for the east side of Wolfe Street between McElderry and Jefferson streets. Designed by Ayers Saint Gross of Baltimore, it will combine nursing programs now scattered over five sites on two campuses.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
Johns Hopkins Medicine will launch today one of the largest and most expensive private building campaigns in Maryland history - a $1 billion reconstruction of its 52-acre East Baltimore medical campus. If Hopkins can raise enough money, the master plan calls for the construction of 2.2 million square feet of space over the next seven to 10 years. It includes research facilities, a children's and maternal building, a cardiovascular and critical care tower, and renovation or demolition of many other structures.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
With a quarter-of-a-billion-dollar surge of construction and renovation, Johns Hopkins is building to keep its health research and clinical facilities world-class -- and to meet the needs of a changing marketplace.Most of the activity is centered on the East Baltimore medical campus, where the biggest replacement project ever at Hopkins -- a cancer treatment center and nearby cancer research building -- is under way, at a cost of nearly $200 million.Such massive projects are becoming rarer because of the difficulties of projecting revenue from managed-care insurers, said Ronald R. Peterson, president of Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Health System.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
THE JOHNS HOPKINS Medical Institutions' East Baltimore campus is expected to add two large academic buildings, costing a total of $67 million, as part of an effort by administrators to upgrade teaching and research facilities.The first project due to get under way is a $17 million School of Nursing building, planned for the east side of Wolfe Street between McElderry and Jefferson streets. Designed by Ayers Saint Gross of Baltimore, it will combine nursing programs now scattered over five sites on two campuses.
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