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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
As communities across Baltimore gathered Saturday for events designed to address the violence troubling the city, mayhem occurred once more. In a chaotic chain of events, the city's police commissioner came across a shooting in a Northeast neighborhood, prompting a police response that led to an accident and left several people injured. About 50 people turned out in midafternoon for a three-mile walk of the Sinclair Lane neighborhood to celebrate the beginning of the school year and to provide positive role models in the hope that children will steer away from violence.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
A man was seriously hurt Friday evening in East Baltimore when a grill exploded, a city fire spokesman said. Fire personnel were summoned around 7:13 p.m. to the 2000 block Llewelyn Ave., according to Ian Brennan, city fire spokesman. The victim, who was not identified, was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center with life-threatening injuries, Brennan said. The cause of the explosion remains under investigation. tim.wheeler@baltsun.com
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
The Baltimore Community Foundation awarded nearly $123,000 for 33 community projects that will pay for litter clean up, increase the number of vegetable gardens and bring kids and police officers together for flag football games. The foundation, which announced the grants Friday, will distribute the money throughout the city and Baltimore County as a way to spur neighborhood activism. The grants range from $1,500 to $5,000. "Social engagement is key to neighborhood development, and we are seeing some real changes happening from the bottom up," Tom Wilcox, foundation president, said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore city officials belatedly disclosed Friday that sewage overflows topped 12 million gallons during last week's downpour, four times what had previously been acknowledged. It was the most untreated waste reported spilled in the city in a single day since 2006, according to state records. Top managers of the city Department of Public Works just learned Friday of three previously unreported overflows during the Aug. 12 rainstorm, according to department spokesman Jeffrey Raymond.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
J. Paul Gahagan, a retired Social Security Administration disability analyst and an accomplished woodworker, died Sunday at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville of complications from an infection. He was 87. James Paul Gahagan - he never used his first name, family members said - was born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore. "He grew up on Aiken Street and had many childhood adventures, including walking over the beams of the Howard Street bridge," said a daughter, Kathy Briggs of Stoneleigh.
NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Date: May 31 Her story: Kia Houston, 37, grew up in Baltimore and Randallstown. She is a budget specialist for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her parents, Vernetta and Daniel Wilson, live in Randallstown. His story: Mike Castille, 38, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a systems engineer for Johns Hopkins Community Physicians. His mother and stepfather, Brenda and Lester Yard, live in Bowie. His father, Nolan Castille, lives in Queens. Their story: Kia and Mike met in late 2007 when they were both working at MBNA Corp., which was based in Baltimore at the time.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
An East Baltimore man was arrested and charged with attempted first degree murder for an Aug. 8 shooting that injured a 17-year-old boy, police said Friday. John Heath, 24, shot the boy twice in the leg in the 1100 block of N. Lakewood Avenue after the two got into an argument, police said. Heath is being held in the Baltimore City Detention Center. The victim, who was not identified, was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.
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