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NEWS
May 18, 2003
THE REPORTED sighting of a suspected al-Qaida bomber in Kenya was enough to compel Britain last week to cancel all commercial air travel to and from that East African country. There is reason to be frightened with such a dangerous character on the loose in a country so difficult to secure. The FBI has put a $25 million bounty on the head of Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, who is linked to the 1998 and 2002 bombings of two buildings in Kenya that claimed 241 lives. He may also have been involved in last November's unsuccessful missile attack on a passenger aircraft that carried 226 tourists.
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NEWS
September 16, 2014
President Barack Obama announced today that he will send up to 3,000 health workers and military personnel to Liberia to help stem the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa that has paralyzed the health system there and threatened the lives of millions of people in the region. It's about time. The epidemic represents a crisis of global dimensions, and the fight against it requires the U.S. to take a leadership role if the effort is to succeed. We can only wonder how many lives could have been saved if the Obama administration had taken these steps - and more - weeks ago. The World Health Organization estimates that as many as 20,000 people could be infected by the Ebola virus in the coming months, which would make it the largest outbreak in history.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1995
Zanzibar, once a center of the spice trade, has been attracting the tourist trade of late. Hotels and cultural sites on the island off the east coast of Africa had fallen into disrepair. But in the last few years, the government (Zanzibar and Tanganyika united in 1964 to become Tanzania) has encouraged tourism investment. Tour operators say improved facilities have begun drawing travelers, many of them adding stops in Zanzibar to longer tours.One of the island's chief attractions is the Stone Town section of the city of Zanzibar, with its winding streets and balconied limestone houses with ornately carved doors.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Helping the needy The churches of Wilde Lake will be collecting eyeglasses, musical instruments, adult and children's bikes, hearing aids, portable sewing machines, women's pocketbooks, sports equipment and cellphones for distribution to needy families in Latin America, Africa and Baltimore. Items can be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center's parking lot, 10431 Twin Rivers Road. Tax receipts will be provided. Information: 301-774-7069.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
The specter of a major famine has reappeared in Africa.Some 20 million people are at risk, mainly in the Horn of Africa and East Africa, according to officials from the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID), the United Nations, and private agencies such as Catholic Relief Services.Concern has been voiced that the international community will be unable to mobilize enough food to meet the growing demand. Pledges from donor countries have not come near the requirement of about 3 million metric tons of relief food.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
More than three months after playing the final football game of a storied 17-year career, Ray Lewis has apparently found his next challenge. The former Ravens linebacker said today on his Twitter page that he will climb Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to raise money and awareness for clean water projects in East Africa. Lewis will undertake the mission, which he has billed TackleKili, next month. Kilimanjaro is the highest free-standing mountain in the world and is over 19,000 feet above sea level.
NEWS
December 10, 1996
Mary Leakey, 83, an archaeologist and anthropologist whose curiosity about prehistoric humans led her and her husband to momentous discoveries about man's origins, died yesterday in Nairobi, Kenya.Louis and Mary Leakey found fossils in Tanzania and Kenya that indicated man's evolution began in East Africa 2 million years ago, far earlier than was believed at the time of the discovery.Three months before her death, Mrs. Leakey agreed it was impossible for scientists to pinpoint exactly when prehistoric man became fully human.
NEWS
By Knut Royce and Knut Royce,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence officials say al-Qaida is preparing a terrorist attack in East Africa, most likely in Kenya, that could involve an attempt to shoot down an airliner. The State Department issued travel advisories Wednesday urging Americans to avoid travel to the area, and Britain suspended flights to and from Kenya. U.S. airlines have no scheduled flights to East Africa. In two separate advisories - one for East Africa and the other for Kenya - State Department officials warned that the "threat to aircraft by terrorists using shoulder-fired missiles continues in Kenya."
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A graduate of Johns Hopkins University's international studies school, eight months pregnant, was among dozens killed in the weekend massacre at a Kenyan shopping mall. Elif Yavuz, 33, who earned her graduate degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in 2004, was killed along with her husband, architect Ross Langdon, according to media reports. Gunmen stormed the Westgate Mall in Nairobi on Saturday, and were still locked in a standoff with Kenyan forces by Monday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 2005
ROME -- As bird culls to control probable new outbreaks of bird flu started on farms in Russia and Macedonia, U.N. officials here warned yesterday that their far larger concern was that the virus was on its way to East Africa, where the disease could be nearly impossible to control. As bird flu has jumped this year from Southeast Asia to China, Russia, Kazakhstan and - more recently - into the Balkan region of Europe, scientists have become somewhat belatedly convinced that wild migratory birds are one of the main carriers of the H5N1 strain of avian influenza.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A graduate of Johns Hopkins University's international studies school, eight months pregnant, was among dozens killed in the weekend massacre at a Kenyan shopping mall. Elif Yavuz, 33, who earned her graduate degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in 2004, was killed along with her husband, architect Ross Langdon, according to media reports. Gunmen stormed the Westgate Mall in Nairobi on Saturday, and were still locked in a standoff with Kenyan forces by Monday.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | August 8, 2013
Last year, in the heat of his campaign, President Barack Obama boasted that he had put al-Qaida "on the path to defeat. " This year, with 19 U.S. consulates and embassies closed and the State Department issuing vague warnings against travel anywhere in the world, al-Qaida suddenly seems resurgent - and as frightening as ever. So which is it: defeated or resurgent? Neither, really. Al-Qaida hasn't gone away, but it has changed - in a way that makes it less dangerous for Americans at home but more dangerous for Americans who live in the Middle East and Africa.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 5, 2013
Ravens Ray Lewis climbing Mount Kilimanjaro Retired Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis embarked Wednesday on a climb of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest point in Africa at an elevation of 19,340 feet. Lewis is joined on the trip by Doug Pitt , the brother of actor Brad Pitt and a goodwill ambassador in Tanzania, and retired Pro Bowl Chicago Bears defensive lineman Tommie Harris . Lewis is raising money and awareness about the need for clean water in East Africa. The climb is scheduled to continue through Monday.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
More than three months after playing the final football game of a storied 17-year career, Ray Lewis has apparently found his next challenge. The former Ravens linebacker said today on his Twitter page that he will climb Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to raise money and awareness for clean water projects in East Africa. Lewis will undertake the mission, which he has billed TackleKili, next month. Kilimanjaro is the highest free-standing mountain in the world and is over 19,000 feet above sea level.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Gasoline prices have been rising over the past month as revolutionary sentiment roiled the oil-rich Middle East. Now, drivers are bracing for more volatility at the pump, fueled by the latest turmoil in Libya. The average price of regular gasoline in Maryland on Wednesday was $3.14 a gallon — 14 cents higher than in December, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic. Analysts say the price could reach $3.50 to $3.75 a gallon in the coming months. Libya accounts for only about 2 percent of the world's oil production, but unrest in the country — where dictator Moammar Gadhafi has been accused of ordering troops and mercenaries to kill unarmed protesters — has stoked fears of increased instability across the region.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | June 19, 2008
Before leaving the University of Notre Dame for a two-week trip to Ethiopia and Kenya, I was concerned about the rising food prices worldwide. Having grown up in Hong Kong eating rice each day, I was particularly worried by the threefold increase in the price of rice - the staple food for about 3 billion people worldwide. My concern took on a new intensity when I arrived in East Africa and began touring projects supported by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In Africa, the rise in global food prices doesn't mean forgoing a night out on the town or passing up a pair of shoes on sale.
NEWS
By Davan Maharaj and Davan Maharaj,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
NAIROBI, Kenya - During the past 32 years, the African Heritage center has withstood a weakening economy and runaway crime in downtown Nairobi to supply locals and tourists with ethnic art, fashion and artifacts. But this month, it will shut down, the latest victim of Kenya's weakened tourist trade. The final blow was a decision last month by British Airways to suspend flights to the Kenyan capital after intelligence reports predicted that a terror strike by al-Qaida operatives was imminent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | August 29, 2004
The Sleeper, by Christopher Dickey. Simon and Schuster. 273 pages. $24. It was inevitable that the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, would produce, for better or worse, a literature, and equally inevitable that one of the genres would be the thriller. Fortunately for readers, Christopher Dickey has produced in The Sleeper one that is both sophisticated and compelling. The towers of the World Trade Center are coming down as the novel opens. Kurt Kurtovic, an American of Balkan descent living peaceably in Kansas with his wife and small daughter, is compelled to action.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stevenson | January 6, 2008
Kenya has been the anchor of political stability in East Africa. But in recent days, 300 people have been killed and 100,000 have been displaced in political unrest after the re-election of President Mwai Kibaki amid widely reported voting irregularities. As America's key ally in the region, Kenya cannot be allowed to collapse. Mr. Kibaki has acquiesced to a judicial investigation of the elections, but its impartiality is open to doubt. The U.S. must warn Mr. Kibaki that unless he agrees either to a conciliatory accommodation satisfactory to the opposition or to new, legitimate elections, economic sanctions will be in the offing.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | April 15, 2007
For American travelers, one of the biggest expenses of any trip to Africa, whether a South African safari or a beach holiday in the Seychelles, is simply getting there. During high season, most flights cost $2,000 or more round-trip -- in coach -- and require stopping or changing planes. And while a few airlines, such as Delta and South African Airways, have been adding more convenient routes, fares have continued to rise. "They've typically been going up a little more every year," said Jason Hedrick, branch manager at Azumano Travel, an American Express agency in Portland, Ore. "I have clients who have gone, three years ago, with me to East Africa on a $1,200 or $1,300 fare.
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