Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEasel
IN THE NEWS

Easel

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
May 24, 1998
Reading is more than books. Make sure your preschooler has some of the following:* Magnetic fridge letters* Felt board and letters* Easel, pad and markers* Alphabet place mat* ChalkboardDon't forget the gimmick books: pop-ups, cut-outs, paste-ins, coloring books. They're fun for tiny hands.-- From "Raising a Reader," by Paul KroppPub Date: 5/24/98
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
On a recent Thursday night at Tatu in Power Plant Live, the lights were dim and the crowd lively. But the 50-some patrons didn't come for the stylish Asian cuisine - they wanted to sip cocktails and work on their brush strokes. The event - Paint Nite - is a weekly gathering held twice a week in Baltimore bars and restaurants. Participants socialize and re-create a piece of art, while servers dodge easels to deliver cocktails. At this particular Paint Nite, the subject was "African Sun," a simple painting of a sunset with the silhouette of a tree.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Sometimes it's easy for Vincent Vono to feel down about having to live with Parkinson's disease. The disease has snatched his independence and sense of a normal life. The 76-year-old stopped driving last year as his motor skills slowed. He doesn't cook much because it is too exhausting to clean up afterward. Even a short walk across his tiny apartment is a task some days. But for all the disease has taken away from Vono, it has fostered and strengthened a love for art that first developed when he was a boy. Painting is the one thing that still comes easily to Vono.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Sometimes it's easy for Vincent Vono to feel down about having to live with Parkinson's disease. The disease has snatched his independence and sense of a normal life. The 76-year-old stopped driving last year as his motor skills slowed. He doesn't cook much because it is too exhausting to clean up afterward. Even a short walk across his tiny apartment is a task some days. But for all the disease has taken away from Vono, it has fostered and strengthened a love for art that first developed when he was a boy. Painting is the one thing that still comes easily to Vono.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2000
ANTHONY Gerard DeSales -- also known as Tony the Artist, also known as Petey, and certainly one of the most interesting men I've ever met -- stood for years on the corner of Fawn and High in Little Italy, giving postcards to people destined for places he knew he'd never see. He took great delight in this. Tony drew the scenes on the postcards -- scenes of his beloved Little Italy and the Inner Harbor, usually -- and he addressed the postcards to himself, then asked tourists coming from the restaurants to mail them once they got home.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 15, 2006
In a primeval landscape of gnarled trees and weathered rocks, a bubbling brook swirls and eddies under tumultuous skies filled with black storm clouds and billowing white cirrus clouds. The rocks in the foreground, rendered in heavily impastoed paint slathered on with the edge of a palette knife, have a three-dimensional solidity that is all the more vivid for the obvious imprint of the artist's hand.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 14, 1991
Orson Welles once lamented that the only thing a writer needed was a pen and an artist an easel -- but the film director needed an army.Getting an army has historically been the rub of the movie business; but hard as that is, imagine how much harder it would be if you were a young black male living in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. You're 17 years old. Where do you get your army?Or imagine that you're 22 and you're from South Central L.A., the stalking ground of the Bloods and the Crips, and you seethe to make a film that tells the truth about your growing up. Armies don't grow on trees, not even palms.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 14, 1990
In Dundalk, on the dusty second floor of the police station, a young man has spent nearly two years working in solitary confinement.The confinement, however, was voluntary, and Robert Miller doesn't regret a minute of it.The young artist spent the time on a 12-foot-by-7-foot painting of the Battle of North Point, in which Maryland militia turned back a British invasion on Sept. 12, 1814, during the War of 1812.The huge painting shows U.S. Gen. John S. Stricker, against a dramatic blue sky with threatening clouds, seated on a rearing horse and addressing a platoon of men preparing to charge.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | April 7, 2006
Most people would not associate the words creative and competitive. Generally speaking, the development of a work of art is primarily the former. The showing of it, however, is often the latter -- and it can be a ruthless, cutthroat experience. The fact is, no one wants to give up his or her space, whether it is framed on a wall, spotlighted on a stage or printed on the page. With a certain amount of life experience, however, comes a perspective that is considerably more generous, even selfless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
On a recent Thursday night at Tatu in Power Plant Live, the lights were dim and the crowd lively. But the 50-some patrons didn't come for the stylish Asian cuisine - they wanted to sip cocktails and work on their brush strokes. The event - Paint Nite - is a weekly gathering held twice a week in Baltimore bars and restaurants. Participants socialize and re-create a piece of art, while servers dodge easels to deliver cocktails. At this particular Paint Nite, the subject was "African Sun," a simple painting of a sunset with the silhouette of a tree.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 15, 2006
In a primeval landscape of gnarled trees and weathered rocks, a bubbling brook swirls and eddies under tumultuous skies filled with black storm clouds and billowing white cirrus clouds. The rocks in the foreground, rendered in heavily impastoed paint slathered on with the edge of a palette knife, have a three-dimensional solidity that is all the more vivid for the obvious imprint of the artist's hand.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | April 7, 2006
Most people would not associate the words creative and competitive. Generally speaking, the development of a work of art is primarily the former. The showing of it, however, is often the latter -- and it can be a ruthless, cutthroat experience. The fact is, no one wants to give up his or her space, whether it is framed on a wall, spotlighted on a stage or printed on the page. With a certain amount of life experience, however, comes a perspective that is considerably more generous, even selfless.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
At 95, with failing eyesight, Elizabeth McShane can barely see the details of her paintings. But she can see enough to remember. A fragile figure, she stands erect in the tiny art gallery at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson, leaning only slightly against her walker to get a closer look at her impressionistic paintings, the old chair she gilded, the mirror she transformed into art. She can see just enough to recall where she painted her lush...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2000
ANTHONY Gerard DeSales -- also known as Tony the Artist, also known as Petey, and certainly one of the most interesting men I've ever met -- stood for years on the corner of Fawn and High in Little Italy, giving postcards to people destined for places he knew he'd never see. He took great delight in this. Tony drew the scenes on the postcards -- scenes of his beloved Little Italy and the Inner Harbor, usually -- and he addressed the postcards to himself, then asked tourists coming from the restaurants to mail them once they got home.
FEATURES
May 24, 1998
Reading is more than books. Make sure your preschooler has some of the following:* Magnetic fridge letters* Felt board and letters* Easel, pad and markers* Alphabet place mat* ChalkboardDon't forget the gimmick books: pop-ups, cut-outs, paste-ins, coloring books. They're fun for tiny hands.-- From "Raising a Reader," by Paul KroppPub Date: 5/24/98
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
If you think abstract and realistic artists regard each other as brothers under the skin, just different folks with different brush strokes, think again. Better yet, visit the Charcoal Club's weekly life drawing sessions. For only $5 you can spend three hours drawing a live, nude model.But if you are inclined to draw the young woman in such a way that both eyes wind up on the same side of her head, or in a burst of creative expression supply her with toes that look like piano keys, you will put your fellow sketchers out of sorts.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
At 95, with failing eyesight, Elizabeth McShane can barely see the details of her paintings. But she can see enough to remember. A fragile figure, she stands erect in the tiny art gallery at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson, leaning only slightly against her walker to get a closer look at her impressionistic paintings, the old chair she gilded, the mirror she transformed into art. She can see just enough to recall where she painted her lush...
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
If you think abstract and realistic artists regard each other as brothers under the skin, just different folks with different brush strokes, think again. Better yet, visit the Charcoal Club's weekly life drawing sessions. For only $5 you can spend three hours drawing a live, nude model.But if you are inclined to draw the young woman in such a way that both eyes wind up on the same side of her head, or in a burst of creative expression supply her with toes that look like piano keys, you will put your fellow sketchers out of sorts.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 14, 1991
Orson Welles once lamented that the only thing a writer needed was a pen and an artist an easel -- but the film director needed an army.Getting an army has historically been the rub of the movie business; but hard as that is, imagine how much harder it would be if you were a young black male living in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. You're 17 years old. Where do you get your army?Or imagine that you're 22 and you're from South Central L.A., the stalking ground of the Bloods and the Crips, and you seethe to make a film that tells the truth about your growing up. Armies don't grow on trees, not even palms.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 14, 1990
In Dundalk, on the dusty second floor of the police station, a young man has spent nearly two years working in solitary confinement.The confinement, however, was voluntary, and Robert Miller doesn't regret a minute of it.The young artist spent the time on a 12-foot-by-7-foot painting of the Battle of North Point, in which Maryland militia turned back a British invasion on Sept. 12, 1814, during the War of 1812.The huge painting shows U.S. Gen. John S. Stricker, against a dramatic blue sky with threatening clouds, seated on a rearing horse and addressing a platoon of men preparing to charge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.