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NEWS
March 27, 2010
The House approved a bill Friday that would ease state requirements for some developers to keep pollution from washing off their building sites. The vote was 127-13. The measure now heads to the Senate. Developers and local officials have been pressing for some relief from new storm-water pollution regulations scheduled to take effect May 4, arguing that they could cost the state jobs and tax revenues and aggravate suburban sprawl. The bill would exempt some projects already in the works from having to meet the new, tougher requirements for controlling runoff, and it would give breaks to some redevelopment projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tyler Waldman | September 17, 2014
Baltimore County has listened to "spokes-persons" who pushed for designated bicycle routes in and around Towson, and on Wednesday county officials and bicyclists celebrated the opening of a 4.23-mile Bike Beltway. Cyclists joined County Executive Kevin Kamenetz for an inaugural trip around the network, which loops around central Towson, passing Towson's shopping district, government center, two universities, Towson High School and numerous residential neighborhoods. "Towson is dense enough, it's walkable enough that you shouldn't have to drive from [Towson]
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FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | March 10, 1991
THERE'S A LITTLE MORE EASE TO DRESS SHAPES THIS SPRING. THE A-LINE AND TRAPEZE INSTANTLY CAMOUFLAGE ALL FLAWS, WHILE THE NEW SHIFTS AND CHEMISES CAN BE FIT QUITE SNUGLY TO FLAUNT A SLIM FIGURE OR WORN MORE LOOSELY TO JUST SKIM THE CURVES.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
The horrific traffic crash last Saturday at 1 a.m. on the New Jersey Turnpike that killed one person and left comedian Tracy Morgan in critical condition at a hospital near Trenton calls attention to the danger of tired truck drivers. Investigators suspect the driver of a Walmart tractor-trailer had dozed off when he slammed into the back of the comedian's limousine bus which was returning to New York from a show in Dover, Del. The exact circumstances are not entirely clear, and police have stressed that the incident remains under investigation.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In one of several desperate bids to ease the tightening grip of United Nations sanctions, Col. Muammar el Kadafi's troubled regime in Libya has held out the prospect of turning over an indicted CIA renegade to appease the U.S. government, according to U.S. sources and a former CIA official.Libya also may be willing to pay millions of dollars in compensation to the families of those who died in the 1988 bombing over Scotland of Pan American World Airways Flight 103 in hopes of pacifying its most outspoken critics and thus easing international pressure, according to families and their representatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN WASHINGTON | April 3, 2003
My best efforts with DVD burners have usually been rewarded with blank disks that wouldn't play in a DVD player connected to my television. But the folks at Sony finally have figured out how to make DVD creation a much more rewarding experience with their DRX-500UL external burner ($400). While an internal version is available, I didn't test that. DVD burning is a good way to back up materials on your computer as well as share video that won't deteriorate over the years. So, a DVD burner that offers few hassles is welcome in the tech world.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | August 31, 1992
Computer users will argue about it endlessly, but a strong case can be made that the Apple Macintosh is the easiest personal computer to use. The reason is Apple's operating system, which uses point-and-click commands. Even so, Apple has developed a new program that makes it even simpler to use the Mac. The software is called At Ease, and it is intended for children, teachers, business executives and people who hate computers.At Ease ($59) is actually a facade for Apple's regular System 7 operating system.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland businessman Richard Tworek has a profitable company with a steady cash flow and a good credit record, but he can't get a new line of credit from the bank he has used for seven years.He is a victim of a credit crunch that has been hampering small business expansion across the nation for the past three years, undermining vital job creation in a period of dramatically increasing unemployment.Today, President Clinton will try to do something about it. Eager to foster economic growth in general and small business activity in particular, he will ease federal bank lending regulations that he and the industry claim have been restricting the flow of credit.
NEWS
By Tonya Maxwell and Tonya Maxwell,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2005
In a tiny laboratory in Germany, an obscure young pharmacist's apprentice managed to concentrate the power of poppies into crystals that could control coughs, ease pain and tease users into a pleasant slumber. Friedrich Sertuerner, 22, published a paper announcing his discovery in 1805. He was ignored. So he went back to his experiments, injecting dogs with the drug he had extracted from opium and doping himself and his buddies. A dozen years later he published again, this time naming his discovery after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The federal government issued its first ratings of car seats for children yesterday and called for improvements in a life-saving product that many parents have trouble installing correctly. Only three models earned straight A's in the five categories rated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for convenience and ease of use. Two were Graco Comfort Sport models and a third was an Evenflo Tribute. "Our expectation is that all child-seat manufacturers will make A-rated seats before too long," said Jeffrey W. Runge, head of the agency.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Tax day won't be an ordinary work day for Kasi Hernandez, who will get into the shop before dawn, hours before other employees arrive. He's not an accountant or a tax preparer, though, and he's not working a hot line for stressed taxpayers. He makes cookies. He's the general manager at Great American Cookie at The Mall in Columbia, and because April 15, the deadline for filing taxes, has turned into a promotional opportunity for some retailers, he has to get up at 4:30 a.m. and be at work by 5 to start making the cookies, between 600 and 750 of them.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
DETROIT -- Orioles manager Buck Showalter said during spring training that left fielder David Lough could be eased, at some point, into the leadoff role against right-handers. Six games into the season, Lough has started four times and batted first twice - in consecutive games against right-handers Saturday and Sunday - after hitting second in his first two starts of the year. Showalter hasn't committed to the speedy Lough as the permanent leadoff hitter yet, instead of right fielder Nick Markakis, but it looks like it could end up that way. “It's an option.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Maureen Royer leaves her 13-year-old dog, Rubie, at home while she works every day, but she doesn't worry that the dog walker won't show up. Royer gets an email every time Rubie's dog walker arrives that tells her not only when the visit started, but the route the Boston terrier/pug mix will take for her stroll, how long the dog was out and when she returns home. "I know my dog is safe," Royer says. And that has made her trust Ashley Woodall, owner of See Spot Walk, even more than she did when they first started working together about a month ago. Woodall, whose business is based in Baltimore, uses an app called Pet Check to let her clients know when and where their dogs are walked.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Now that the editors of the Associated Press Stylebook  have abandoned the over/more than  distinction beloved of American newspapers (and no one else), there is a very real danger that someone may heed them and abandon the baseless crotchet.   But wait: There's more where that came from. Anyone who finds editing arid and meaningless without the enforcement of arbitrary and meaningless distinctions can discover a rich lode in William Cullen Bryant's Index expurgatorius , the source of the original over/more than shibboleth.  Here are some, taken from the list as reprinted in Theodore Bernstein's Miss Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins . You should feel free to forbid them to any writer or editor under your power, since they have exactly the same authority as the over/more than  distinction.  bogus claimed (for asserted)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
The Maryland Senate passed one of the governor's proposals to combat domestic violence Thursday, sending to the House a bill that would make it easier for assault victims to obtain permanent court orders telling their abusers to stay away. Meeting despite the snow, senators approved the measure that would add second-degree assault to the list of crimes that can trigger a protective order. There was no debate or dissent. A similar measure is scheduled for a hearing in the House next week.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
The Coppin State men's basketball team is bracing for a few more weeks without senior small forward Michael Murray, who led the program last season with 12.4 points and 8.9 rebounds per game but is healing a broken right (shooting) hand. But the team might be in good hands during Murray's absence. Sophomore shooting guard Sterling Smith scored a career-high 16 points in Friday's 83-64 loss to California and then surpassed that with 21 points in Sunday's 78-73 win against Oregon State.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 27, 1996
Even with all the dancing, the good venison, the fabulous clothes and witty repartee, no one in the court of Louis XIV ever forgot who was in charge. For the king denied his courtiers the one thing they must have frequently craved:A comfortable place to sit.In late 17th-century France, the king had the only armchair. He gave side chairs only to a chosen few. Nearly everyone else stood, relishing the opulent surroundings, trying not to think about their feet.Real luxury, as Louis XIV knew, is not the same as grandeur.
SPORTS
June 16, 2006
Good morning --Ben Roethlisberger -- Did seeing Mark Cuban wear your jersey on Letterman ease your pain?
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
The confessions from moms on the Scary Mommy blog are often funny: the spoon kept in the glovebox for eating Ben & Jerry's in the store parking lot, letting ketchup count as a "vegetable," going to the gym to read magazines instead of work out. But as Thanksgiving approached two years ago, ScaryMommy.com founder Jill Smokler saw despair from her readers: the mother who swallowed her pride to get a food box, only to be told she made too...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2013
Reducing air pollution has given an unexpectedly big boost to long-running efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, a new study finds. Resarchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science determined that nitrogen pollution in nine mostly forested rivers and streams in the Appalachian reaches of the bay watershed has declined in tandem with government-mandated air pollution reductions for power plants and motor vehicles....
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