Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEarthworms
IN THE NEWS

Earthworms

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Azrael | May 23, 1995
When I lean on the spade and push downthrough layers of old leavesto bury our garbage in the compost pit --cracked eggshells, banana peels dark as soaked leather shoes,scraps of tangerine skins,aromatic apple cores,grounds of coffee, gritty damp --I love to see the earthworms whopull tunnels of air through the choked underground@and eat what we don'tand produce dirtthat crumbles and smells sweetas devils food cake.When I see one or hold onebeautiful, perfect with no feet or face,confirmed in its character by all it can't do(sing jump type drive a car)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | February 21, 2008
The moon was full at 10:29 p.m. during last night's eclipse. Tonight, Luna will rise again, nearly full, at 6:39 p.m. This is the third full moon since the winter solstice, which makes it the Lenten Moon, the Sap Moon, the Worm Moon or the Crow Moon, depending on your cultural preferences. They all seem self-explanatory. It's Lent, and one presumes that the sap is rising and the earthworms are stirring somewhere. And the crows' cawing proclaims the end of winter, despite the snow.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2006
In the most recent issue of your newsletter, you said compost encourages earthworms. What's the point of having more earthworms? Earthworms are essential for good soil. When earthworms digest compost (or other organic matter such as lawn thatch), they excrete castings 10 times richer than average soil. Their tunneling creates avenues for water, nutrients, air and plant roots to reach deeper into the earth. (Often we don't think of roots as needing air, but they will suffocate without it.)
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2006
In the most recent issue of your newsletter, you said compost encourages earthworms. What's the point of having more earthworms? Earthworms are essential for good soil. When earthworms digest compost (or other organic matter such as lawn thatch), they excrete castings 10 times richer than average soil. Their tunneling creates avenues for water, nutrients, air and plant roots to reach deeper into the earth. (Often we don't think of roots as needing air, but they will suffocate without it.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 1, 2004
If you are a gardener, or intend to become one, now's the time to commence dreaming. Give a warm thought to your vital partner, the earthworm, without whom there would be little or no compost on earth. Which brings me to The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms, by Amy Stewart (Algonquin, 240 pages, $23.95). Stewart is a garden columnist for North Coast Journal in California and writes for other magazines and newspapers. Her previous book was From the Ground Up: The Story of a First Garden (Algonquin, 272 pages, $18.95)
TOPIC
By Sam Hooper Samuels | September 10, 2000
ANGLERS TAKE NOTE: The night crawler at the end of your hook is an invader. According to recent research by an earthworm ecologist, you could dig up approximately the upper half of the North American continent and almost never find an earthworm of true North American descent. "Basically, anything you can buy in a bait store in most of the country is European," said the ecologist, Dr. Sam James, a professor of life sciences at Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa. Biologists have a term for many species that wander into nonnative territory and prosper: weeds.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | May 9, 1993
The thunderstorm ended an hour ago. It was a pounding rain, a gully washer that drenched the yard. We're talking deluge here: There are puddles on the lawn, and earthworms on the patio.This is my cue to grab a pail and rush outside. Not to bail out the lawn. My job is to save the worms.Without my help, they're doomed.Hard rains flood their burrows and drives hundreds of earthworms out of the lawn and onto the pavement, where they wriggle about, awaiting their fate. Left alone, their days are numbered.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | February 21, 2008
The moon was full at 10:29 p.m. during last night's eclipse. Tonight, Luna will rise again, nearly full, at 6:39 p.m. This is the third full moon since the winter solstice, which makes it the Lenten Moon, the Sap Moon, the Worm Moon or the Crow Moon, depending on your cultural preferences. They all seem self-explanatory. It's Lent, and one presumes that the sap is rising and the earthworms are stirring somewhere. And the crows' cawing proclaims the end of winter, despite the snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | February 20, 2003
Did you know that there are approximately 2,700 different kinds of earthworms? That in one acre of land, there can be more than a million earthworms? That worms can grow new tails, but not new heads? That baby worms hatch from cocoons smaller than a grain of rice? That a worm will become paralyzed and die if it's exposed to light for more than an hour, or if its skin dries out? These are just a few of the fascinating facts about worms that the staff at Patapsco Valley State Park will present in a program tomorrow called "Wonderful Wiggly Worms."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 24, 2002
Ever looked for a needle in a haystack? I'm talking a real haystack. No? Well, surely you've searched for a buried treasure. What - no? Well, you've at least watched earthworm races, yes? Certainly you must have. But if you've somehow gone through life without these experiences, it's high time you tried 'em all. "Sunday in the Park: A Day of Old-Fashioned Family Fun" takes place Sunday at Centennial Park in Columbia. Between searching for needles in haystacks (OK, they're really turkey basters)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 1, 2004
If you are a gardener, or intend to become one, now's the time to commence dreaming. Give a warm thought to your vital partner, the earthworm, without whom there would be little or no compost on earth. Which brings me to The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms, by Amy Stewart (Algonquin, 240 pages, $23.95). Stewart is a garden columnist for North Coast Journal in California and writes for other magazines and newspapers. Her previous book was From the Ground Up: The Story of a First Garden (Algonquin, 272 pages, $18.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | February 20, 2003
Did you know that there are approximately 2,700 different kinds of earthworms? That in one acre of land, there can be more than a million earthworms? That worms can grow new tails, but not new heads? That baby worms hatch from cocoons smaller than a grain of rice? That a worm will become paralyzed and die if it's exposed to light for more than an hour, or if its skin dries out? These are just a few of the fascinating facts about worms that the staff at Patapsco Valley State Park will present in a program tomorrow called "Wonderful Wiggly Worms."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 24, 2002
Ever looked for a needle in a haystack? I'm talking a real haystack. No? Well, surely you've searched for a buried treasure. What - no? Well, you've at least watched earthworm races, yes? Certainly you must have. But if you've somehow gone through life without these experiences, it's high time you tried 'em all. "Sunday in the Park: A Day of Old-Fashioned Family Fun" takes place Sunday at Centennial Park in Columbia. Between searching for needles in haystacks (OK, they're really turkey basters)
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2001
FEEDING TIME AT Piney Run Park Nature Center is a busy time for naturalist Elaine Sweitzer. She prepares meals for snakes, birds of prey, toads, frogs, snapping turtles, honeybees and fish. All these species are kept in various habitats around the nature center. Sweitzer enjoys feeding the animals, but has to prepare some very unusual meals. Some of the snakes eat mice (stored frozen and thawed for meal time). The toads and frogs like live crickets. The garter snakes like live goldfish to prey upon.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | November 19, 2000
Twice a year, almost everybody who's anybody in the home furnishings world flocks to the International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C., to display and view the very latest in furniture and accessories for the home. It's the place to discover trends and bright new stars, to divine what the hot colors will be, to see what manufacturers expect consumers to go for. Here are some highlights from last month's show: The British are invading again, but this time they're not trashing the furniture, they're selling it. Probably the most notable collection is from a newcomer to these shores, though not to the business: Harrod's, London's famous department store, through Highland House, with 55 pieces based on the store's 150-year-old archives.
TOPIC
By Sam Hooper Samuels | September 10, 2000
ANGLERS TAKE NOTE: The night crawler at the end of your hook is an invader. According to recent research by an earthworm ecologist, you could dig up approximately the upper half of the North American continent and almost never find an earthworm of true North American descent. "Basically, anything you can buy in a bait store in most of the country is European," said the ecologist, Dr. Sam James, a professor of life sciences at Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa. Biologists have a term for many species that wander into nonnative territory and prosper: weeds.
FEATURES
April 19, 1998
Q: Spring came so fast this year that I didn't have time to prune my apple and pear trees. The blooms have already dropped off and the little apples are forming. Is it too late to prune?A: It's OK to prune, but do it as soon as possible. As the leaves enlarge, it becomes a little harder to see the shoots and branches that require pruning. You might want to thin your fruits while you're pruning.Q: I'm a gardening novice and am confused about how to apply the soluble plant food that I bought.
FEATURES
April 19, 1998
Q: Spring came so fast this year that I didn't have time to prune my apple and pear trees. The blooms have already dropped off and the little apples are forming. Is it too late to prune?A: It's OK to prune, but do it as soon as possible. As the leaves enlarge, it becomes a little harder to see the shoots and branches that require pruning. You might want to thin your fruits while you're pruning.Q: I'm a gardening novice and am confused about how to apply the soluble plant food that I bought.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.