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NEWS
May 31, 1992
As the leaders of Japan, Great Britain, Germany and, belatedly, the United States prepare to meet colleagues and 30,000 clerics, artists, activists and journalists at the Rio Earth Summit, all owe quiet homage to Rachel Carson, whose "Silent Spring" sparked the modern environmental movement.Her book radically altered America's consciousness 30 years ago, leading the world into a new understanding of the fragility of life on Mother Earth. The U.S. Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1963, and after 20 million people took part in 1970's massive Earth Day demonstrations, a Clean Water Act, then the Endangered Species Act joined the arsenal of nature's protection.
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By RAYMOND C. OFFENHEISER | September 10, 2000
THE UNITED NATIONS Millennium Summit, which ended on Friday, was the last big event of this year's summer summit season. It came soon after the Group of Eight meetings in Okinawa, and will be closely followed by the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. This summer of summits came at the end of a decade of major international conferences: Children's Summit (1990), Jomtien Conference on Education for All (1990), Earth Summit (1992), Conference on Human Rights (1993)
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 14, 1992
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -- President Bush left the Earth Summit yesterday firing parting shots at his many critics.Speaking at a news conference, Mr. Bush dismissed suggestions that his appearance here had not gone well.Mr. Bush, who agreed to sign only a watered-down version of the summit treaty to reduce the threat of global warming, proposed Friday that the nations gather on Jan. 1 to report specific plans to reduce emissions of pollutants that trap heat in the Earth's atmosphere.At the news conference, Mr. Bush rejected the notion that his call for an early start on the global warming issue was not welcomed: "The developed nations want to meet the commitments they've signed up for, so I've not found that it wasn't well received at all."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
UNITED NATIONS -- Four years after the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro propelled the environment to the top of the world agenda, the movement seems to have reached an impasse at the United Nations, where a commission set up to monitor progress since Rio has ended two weeks of talks.The Commission on Sustainable Development -- dedicated to the notion that nations can continue expanding their economies without destroying their environment -- heard success stories as it prepared for a major review next year of how far the world has come since the 1992 Earth Summit.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The organizer of the forthcoming "Earth summit" in Brazil urged the Bush administration yesterday to recognize that the meeting represents an opportunity, not a threat, for the U.S. economy.Maurice Strong, secretary-general of the U.N. Conference on Environment and Development, said U.S. representatives participating in negotiations leading up to the summit have been "tough-minded" about certain key issues, such as global warming.But he expressed confidence that the United States and other nations of the world still have time to come to terms on disputes over warming, deforestation and providing economic aid to poor countries.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | June 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Forget the politics and mud-slinging of the Earth Summit: Will it work? Or will it all just dissolve into hot air and paper planes?That's the vexing question environmentalists are asking, even as President Bush and most other leaders of the world gather in a cloud of acrimony and recrimination in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, today to sign a pair of treaties aimed at reining in humankind's decimation of the Earth's plant and animal kingdoms and...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
UNITED NATIONS -- Four years after the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro propelled the environment to the top of the world agenda, the movement seems to have reached an impasse at the United Nations, where a commission set up to monitor progress since Rio has ended two weeks of talks.The Commission on Sustainable Development -- dedicated to the notion that nations can continue expanding their economies without destroying their environment -- heard success stories as it prepared for a major review next year of how far the world has come since the 1992 Earth Summit.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
A U.S. report drafted for next year's "Earth Summit" in Brazil is drawing criticism from environmentalists, who contend that the Bush administration has glossed over the ecological harm caused by this country's economic growth in the past two decades."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 16, 1992
Welcome President Yeltsin! (But who's minding the store?)Don't knock the Earth Summit. It raised consciousness, at least about how stinking each other's policies are.Nostalgia for Watergate. What won't they think of next?Don't press Perot for a program. He is too busy running to think it up.Now that George has had a taste of Panama he will have the sense not to go to Iraq.City Hall wants to empower communities. Actually, it wants communities to empower City Hall.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | April 10, 1992
In Michigan, scientists have discovered a 10,000-year-old fungus, weighing as much as a whale, 30 acres large, hidden under the ground, with only pretty, little mushrooms poking above the surface.In New York, at the United Nations, another huge, old and hidden fungus has been vegetating, but the mushrooms are threatening to sprout bigger and uglier. Preparations have been going on for two years for ''The Earth Summit,'' a spectacular U.N. conference scheduled for Rio de Janeiro in June.A domestic political fight about it is already under way. Environmentalists want President Bush to attend the Earth Summit gala and announce that it's a grand idea.
NEWS
April 22, 1993
The United States celebrates Earth Day today with its bona fides as a nation dedicated to preservation of the world environment somewhat restored. Last year this country took a public relations shellacking when President Bush found himself all alone among the major powers in refusing to sign a treaty to slow the disappearance of endangered species and in forcing the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro to accept a policy to combat global warming that lacked specific...
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 18, 1992
The rich rain forest of the Amazon River in South America lies some 5,000 miles south of Baltimore, "but what occurs here affects us all," says WBFF (Channel 45) newsman Jeff Barnd.And in "Dying Rainforests: A Clear Cut Mistake," he offers a useful, elementary primer on the complex processes by which the cutting of trees in Brazil threatens the quality of life throughout the world.The half-hour special, at 8 tonight, results from the Fox 45 News decision in June to send anchorman Barnd and cameraman Scott Livingston to Rio de Janeiro to cover the Earth Summit, the unprecedented gathering of nations concerned about environmental problems.
NEWS
By Peter Honey | August 16, 1992
What sets George Bush apart from his presidential predecessor is that he promised to be "the environmentalpresident."That Ronald Reagan never tried, matters naught. It is by his pledge that Mr. Bush will be judged, and by his pledge that inevitably he will be found wanting.No one, though, can say he did nothing.He put William Reilly, a career conservationist, rather than a lawyer or political crony, in charge of the Environmental Protection Agency.He signed the most ambitious clean air act in history.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 16, 1992
Welcome President Yeltsin! (But who's minding the store?)Don't knock the Earth Summit. It raised consciousness, at least about how stinking each other's policies are.Nostalgia for Watergate. What won't they think of next?Don't press Perot for a program. He is too busy running to think it up.Now that George has had a taste of Panama he will have the sense not to go to Iraq.City Hall wants to empower communities. Actually, it wants communities to empower City Hall.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 14, 1992
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -- President Bush left the Earth Summit yesterday firing parting shots at his many critics.Speaking at a news conference, Mr. Bush dismissed suggestions that his appearance here had not gone well.Mr. Bush, who agreed to sign only a watered-down version of the summit treaty to reduce the threat of global warming, proposed Friday that the nations gather on Jan. 1 to report specific plans to reduce emissions of pollutants that trap heat in the Earth's atmosphere.At the news conference, Mr. Bush rejected the notion that his call for an early start on the global warming issue was not welcomed: "The developed nations want to meet the commitments they've signed up for, so I've not found that it wasn't well received at all."
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | June 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Forget the politics and mud-slinging of the Earth Summit: Will it work? Or will it all just dissolve into hot air and paper planes?That's the vexing question environmentalists are asking, even as President Bush and most other leaders of the world gather in a cloud of acrimony and recrimination in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, today to sign a pair of treaties aimed at reining in humankind's decimation of the Earth's plant and animal kingdoms and...
NEWS
May 8, 1992
By our calculation, George Bush constitutes 0.00000000018 percent of the world's population. He is one of the 5.5 billion, a number likely to double by the year 2010 or 2020. If he goes to the much-ballyhooed "Earth Summit" in Rio de Janeiro next month, he will be just one of the 12,000 politicians, delegates, activists, observers, fadists, gawkers and journalists in attendance in a Brazilian metropolis famous for carnival.That President Bush's go/no-go decision has become a matter of speculation overpowering such small matters as the sheer survival of the human race and other assorted species is grist for amusement.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 18, 1991
Cities of the world are telegraphing a strong message to organizers of ''Earth Summit,'' the United Nations' big Conference on the Environment and Development to be held next June in Rio de Janeiro.Cities want the 166 national delegations to Rio, many led by presidents and prime ministers, to recognize that without healthy cities, the entire globe may get very sick. They want cities high on the conference agenda, up there with global warming, deforestation, desertification, the loss of animal and plant species.
NEWS
May 31, 1992
As the leaders of Japan, Great Britain, Germany and, belatedly, the United States prepare to meet colleagues and 30,000 clerics, artists, activists and journalists at the Rio Earth Summit, all owe quiet homage to Rachel Carson, whose "Silent Spring" sparked the modern environmental movement.Her book radically altered America's consciousness 30 years ago, leading the world into a new understanding of the fragility of life on Mother Earth. The U.S. Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1963, and after 20 million people took part in 1970's massive Earth Day demonstrations, a Clean Water Act, then the Endangered Species Act joined the arsenal of nature's protection.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
By our calculation, George Bush constitutes 0.00000000018 percent of the world's population. He is one of the 5.5 billion, a number likely to double by the year 2010 or 2020. If he goes to the much-ballyhooed "Earth Summit" in Rio de Janeiro next month, he will be just one of the 12,000 politicians, delegates, activists, observers, fadists, gawkers and journalists in attendance in a Brazilian metropolis famous for carnival.That President Bush's go/no-go decision has become a matter of speculation overpowering such small matters as the sheer survival of the human race and other assorted species is grist for amusement.
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