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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
NASA has cut spending on Earth science to the point where the network of satellites that observe the planet "is at risk of collapse," a National Research Council panel said yesterday. The group called the trend "alarming" and said it threatens advances in understanding the changing nature of the planet. In a document released yesterday, the 18-member panel urged NASA to revive and launch some missions that have been canceled, delayed or scaled back as the space agency shifts priorities to fulfill President Bush's "vision" for sending astronauts to the moon and Mars.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The first U.S.-launched satellite, Explorer I, was 6 feet long and weighed 30 pounds, and it led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belt that surrounds Earth. More than 50 years later, scientists could do a lot more with far less. Scientists in Maryland are helping to design satellites that could fit in a shoebox yet provide the same - or better - capabilities as NASA spacecraft that are far larger and more costly. The devices, composed of one or more 10-centimeter cubes, have been used over the past decade for affordable yet relatively low-tech experiments for university students, but a pair recently launched could advance the technology.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON - The Smithsonian Institution has opened its new exhibition hall - a super-secured repository where geology dazzles even the most jaded of visitors - with a gem of a show."
NEWS
By Waleed Abdalati | November 19, 2009
Last month, 360 miles above the Earth, a little-noticed light went dark. It was the third and final laser on NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), developed and managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. For the last 6 1/2 years, ICESat has been using precise laser measurements to determine how much the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are contributing to the rise of the global seas and how much the sea ice that blankets the Arctic Ocean is thinning in ways that can affect climate all over the world.
NEWS
June 21, 1992
Howard teacher chosenEdward Nawrocki, the department chairman and earth science teacher at Howard High School, has been selected to participate in Project ESTEEM, Earth Science Teachers Exploring Exemplary Materials.Nawrocki will attend Harvard University July 6-24 and will develop hands-on earth science education activities for students grades seven to 12.The project, sponsored by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Harvard's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, is financed by the National Science Foundation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
If there's a would-be astronaut or astronomer in your house (or even a "coulda-been"), they will find a lot to do today in downtown Baltimore as the Goddard Space Flight Center celebrates its 50th anniversary and five decades of space science in Maryland. Along with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, Goddard has assembled more than 100 free exhibits and activities for kids and adults at the Baltimore Convention Center, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Visitors can meet NASA astronaut and Baltimore native Ricky Arnold, just back from a shuttle flight to the International Space Station; explore interactive exhibits on Earth science and planetary exploration, and speak with real space scientists and engineers about their careers.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Mention of the space program calls to mind images of interplanetary adventurers exploring distant orbs. But the most vital work involves satellite cameras focused here on Earth. These revolving researchers send back information used to predict short-term weather events as well as the long-term impact of environmental changes. Hurricanes, droughts, earthquakes, the polar ice caps, ocean and coastal ecosystems, all are being studied in hopes of a better understanding of the forces at play - as well as what can and should be done about them.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Century High School student Kristen Rogers recently won a logo contest sponsored by the Maryland Association of Boards of Education. The theme of the conference -- "Leading for Tomorrow: Preparing Students for the Cyber Future" -- is included in the design. Rogers' logo could appear on tote bags, stationery and the conference brochure. She will receive a $100 savings bond and a certificate from the association. Earth science teacher honored Linda Murphy, an eighth grade earth science teacher at Sykesville Middle School, has received the Outstanding Earth Science Teacher Award from the National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
NEWS
October 31, 2001
WINDOWS ON THE ART WORLD Microsoft revolutionzed the computer world with its Windows software. Now you can find out how Microsoft has also opened windows on the art world with the Microsoft Art Collection at www.microsoft.com / mscorp / artcollection / . Since 1987, Microsoft has been collecting eclectic pieces of art to brighten its work environment. Microsoft shares its artwork on this exciting Web site. You can view current or past exhibits or take a stroll through the recent acquisitions.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
Sitting around a fire just outside of an open mine shaft in northern Michigan might not seem like a summer vacation. But for Jennifer Richardson, a third-year Earth science teacher at Fallston High School who has spent the past two summers learning about mining, it couldn't be more fitting. Richardson spent two three-week sessions at Caledonia Mine on the upper peninsula of Michigan as part of the Teachers' Earth Science Institute put on by the National Science Foundation and Michigan Technical University to educate teachers across the country about the importance and operation of the mining industry.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
If there's a would-be astronaut or astronomer in your house (or even a "coulda-been"), they will find a lot to do today in downtown Baltimore as the Goddard Space Flight Center celebrates its 50th anniversary and five decades of space science in Maryland. Along with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, Goddard has assembled more than 100 free exhibits and activities for kids and adults at the Baltimore Convention Center, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Visitors can meet NASA astronaut and Baltimore native Ricky Arnold, just back from a shuttle flight to the International Space Station; explore interactive exhibits on Earth science and planetary exploration, and speak with real space scientists and engineers about their careers.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Century High School student Kristen Rogers recently won a logo contest sponsored by the Maryland Association of Boards of Education. The theme of the conference -- "Leading for Tomorrow: Preparing Students for the Cyber Future" -- is included in the design. Rogers' logo could appear on tote bags, stationery and the conference brochure. She will receive a $100 savings bond and a certificate from the association. Earth science teacher honored Linda Murphy, an eighth grade earth science teacher at Sykesville Middle School, has received the Outstanding Earth Science Teacher Award from the National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | July 9, 2006
Mary Jo Messenger retired from the Howard County school system after 26 years of service, but that has not stopped her from lending her expertise to math teachers from across the region. For the past two weeks, Messenger, who most recently was head of the mathematics department at River Hill High School, has taught 20 teachers some of the tricks of the trade through the Maryland Governor's Academy for Algebra, a program sponsored by the Maryland Department of Education. The program helps teachers strengthen their knowledge of algebra and data analysis, while furnishing them with skills to help their students pass high school assessment tests.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin said yesterday that an agency-wide effort is under way to make sure political appointees are not stifling scientific openness. Testifying at a hearing of the House Science Committee, Griffin heard lawmakers from both parties ask the space agency to guarantee "free and open inquiry." The debate began three weeks ago after NASA climatologist James Hansen accused a political appointee in the office of public affairs with muzzling his views on global warming because they conflicted with those of the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
NASA has cut spending on Earth science to the point where the network of satellites that observe the planet "is at risk of collapse," a National Research Council panel said yesterday. The group called the trend "alarming" and said it threatens advances in understanding the changing nature of the planet. In a document released yesterday, the 18-member panel urged NASA to revive and launch some missions that have been canceled, delayed or scaled back as the space agency shifts priorities to fulfill President Bush's "vision" for sending astronauts to the moon and Mars.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
Sitting around a fire just outside of an open mine shaft in northern Michigan might not seem like a summer vacation. But for Jennifer Richardson, a third-year Earth science teacher at Fallston High School who has spent the past two summers learning about mining, it couldn't be more fitting. Richardson spent two three-week sessions at Caledonia Mine on the upper peninsula of Michigan as part of the Teachers' Earth Science Institute put on by the National Science Foundation and Michigan Technical University to educate teachers across the country about the importance and operation of the mining industry.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin said yesterday that an agency-wide effort is under way to make sure political appointees are not stifling scientific openness. Testifying at a hearing of the House Science Committee, Griffin heard lawmakers from both parties ask the space agency to guarantee "free and open inquiry." The debate began three weeks ago after NASA climatologist James Hansen accused a political appointee in the office of public affairs with muzzling his views on global warming because they conflicted with those of the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2003
When students in Regina Hobbs' earth-science class learn about humidity and dew point, they don't use traditional tools such as barometers or thermometers. Hobbs, a science teacher at River Hill High School, gives her ninth-graders handheld computers with temperature probes to collect and graph data. "The kids are more motivated," she said. "It breaks up the lesson" to use technology. It is not unusual for Hobbs to use the latest computer gadgets as a motivator. This spring, MICCA named her Howard County's 2003 Outstanding Technology Using Educator.
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