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September 4, 2011
Betty Skelton, a daredevil pilot who was a three-time national aerobatics champion and became known as the "fastest woman on Earth" when she set speed records in airplanes and automobiles, died Aug. 31 at her home in The Villages, Fla. She was 85. She had cancer, said Dorothy S. Cochrane, a friend and the curator of general aviation at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. Ms. Skelton, who made her first solo flight — illegally — at age 12, went on to become a pioneering and charismatic pilot in the days of propellers and open cockpits.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
For years, scientists have suspected that the warm waters of the western Pacific Ocean play a key role in shaping the Earth's climate. But satellite data provided only a partial picture of what's happening in this remote region of the globe. Now, an international team of researchers, including several from Maryland, is engaged in an ambitious effort to quantify those natural processes, making dozens of flights in three aircraft from mid-January through February to track the gases and particles from the ocean as they rise into the upper atmosphere.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Though schools are out and pools are open, summer doesn't officially begin until early Saturday morning. The summer solstice, the point at which the Earth's axis tilts the northern hemisphere its furthest toward the sun, occurs at 6:51 a.m. As the National Climatic Data Center explains , it is when the solar energy reaching Earth is the strongest in the northern hemisphere. At the solstice, the sun takes its most northern path through the sky, which means on this side of the globe, we have our longest days and shortest nights of the year. Friday is the last day of the year in which we can look forward to more sunshine tomorrow.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
I have just voted in my 15th consecutive presidential election and wish to address the many angry Republican voters who have been writing to The Sun to mourn the passing of America's primacy. Please give us a break. Of the 15 elections I have participated in, I have voted for the winner in only seven. Now it's your turn. You lost. Your opinions do not hold water. Remember this: you have been wrong on every important issue in the 20th century. The country is still secure and will remain so under Democratic stewardship just as it did through the 1990s and now in the second decade of the 21st century.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Scientists have gathered a year's worth of satellite observations to create an image showing just how much of Earth is covered in green. The satellite is NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Suomi NPP, which is able to detect subtle differences in vegetation around the globe. Compiling the data resulted in a picture revealing the world's lushest forests and most barren deserts. "The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas," according to NOAA.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 20, 2011
I used to think the protesters in Wisconsin opposed to budget cuts (and union-weakening) might have a point. But my position has now changed because of two very firm rules I've stuck to all my life: 1) Never side with crazy people; 2) Never side with extremely stupid people.  I'm not sure which category the following protesters fall into, but it's one of the above.  As Sarah Palin was being introduced at a recent tea party rally, she was greeted with these insightful comments from the mob.  1)
NEWS
February 2, 2010
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. - The Air Force Academy in Colorado has set up an outdoor worship area for followers of Wicca, Druidism and other Earth-centered religions. A double circle of stones atop a hill on the campus near Colorado Springs has been designated for cadets and other service personnel in the area to practice Earth-centered faiths. The school also has worship facilities for Christians, Jews, Muslims and Buddhists. Academy superintendent Michael Gould has made religious tolerance a priority.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In a room with concrete block walls from which he can barely see the sky, Drake Deming explores the heavens. Several days a week he can be found in his office at the University of Maryland, College Park, surrounded by three computer screens, analyzing information about planets outside our solar system. In these remote regions - no closer than four light years - roughly 24 trillion miles - and as far as hundreds of light years away - scientists hope one day to find an Earth-like world capable of supporting life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
105 years of shows. 90,000 pounds of elephants. And a bunch of shoes, size 28EEEEE. For the clowns, of course. When it comes to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, an entertainment extravaganza that routinely, without being challenged, bills itself as "The Greatest Show on Earth," the numbers alone tell quite a story. There is, for example, 118. That's the number of performers involved in putting on "Fully Charged," the circus show that will be playing at Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena through April 1. They include 25-year-old ringmaster Brian Crawford Scott, among the youngest in the circus' century-plus history; 2 juggling Fusco Brothers, Emiliano and Maximiliano, whose act includes juggling flaming clubs in the dark while standing back-to-back; and 1 Sean Davis, a clown with a degree (really!
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | April 25, 2014
One of the busiest Saturdays of the spring is coming up in Harford County on April 26, featuring four events many people have taken to marking their calendars for each year. Walk A Mile in Her Shoes in Bel Air, Clear Your Clutter Day at Harford Community College, River Sweep on both shores of the Susquehanna River and the Harford Earth Day Celebration in Aberdeen are activities that put service and helping others at the forefront, while at the same time giving participants a chance to have a little fun. Walk a Mile in Her Shoes To coincide with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April, Harford County-based non-profit SARC will host its sixth annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes: The International Men's March to Stop Rape, Sexual Assault & Gender Violence on Saturday in downtown Bel Air. The event has a goal of raising $50,000 to support SARC, which provides hope and resources for victims of domestic violence, sexual violence and stalking.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Showers and a possible thunderstorm were expected Tuesday, with highs in the upper 70s before a windy and clear Wednesday. The National Weather Service predicted an 80 percent chance of showers for Earth Day, mainly before 5 p.m. More showers could be possible between 5 p.m. and midnight, with about a 10th to a quarter of an inch of rainfall overall. Winds will be light at about 6 to 8 miles per hour. Overnight there is about a 40 percent chance of rain, with temperatures dropping into the mid-40s and winds picking up with possible gusts of 30 miles per hour.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 21, 2014
Two new sites have been added to Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway's 14th annual River Sweep, a volunteer shoreline and roadside clean-up in honor of Earth Day, that takes place on April 26 from 9 a.m. to noon, rain or shine. The National Historic Tome School, on what was the Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Port Deposit, is a new location this year, as is Conowingo Creek Boat Launch in Conowingo. Other River Sweep sites include locations in Havre de Grace, Perryville, Port Deposit and Garrett Island.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Mars will appear at its biggest and brightest in the night sky this week as it aligns with the Earth and sun on Tuesday. The red planet reaches what is known as opposition Tuesday, when it and the sun are on directly opposite sides of the Earth. That occurs once about every 26 months, according to NASA. "Earth makes two trips around the sun in about the same amount of time that Mars takes to make one trip," according to NASA . "So sometimes the two planets are on opposite sides of the sun, very far apart, and other times, Earth catches up with its neighbor and passes relatively close to it. " This month, Earth and Mars are meanwhile at their closest for nearly 6 and a half years, appearing bigger and brighter than it has since December 2007, according to EarthSky.org.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Following a scathing audit that revealed widespread mismanagement and spotty enforcement by Baltimore's liquor board, state lawmakers are poised to approve emergency changes to reshape the troubled agency. Bills that advocates say would reform the liquor board — requiring that all records be posted online and granting the city government more control — passed the House of Delegates Monday and garnered initial approval in the Senate on Tuesday. "This would be the largest overhaul of Baltimore City's liquor board since Prohibition," said Sen. Bill Ferguson, a Baltimore Democrat who was one of five state lawmakers who helped craft the bills in response to last year's audit.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
An asteroid was passing within 217,000 miles of Earth on Wednesday afternoon, closer than the moon's distance from the planet. The asteroid is known as  2014 DX110 and is estimated to be 100 feet wide, according to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. It was expected to reach its closest distance to Earth at about 4 p.m. The Slooh Community Observatory was broadcasting the fly-by live online . Scientists detect asteroids passing as closely about 20 times a year, according to JPL.  The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, known as "Spaceguard," monitors them.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured what space scientists called potentially the "comet of the century", Comet ISON, as it speeds toward Earth at 47,000 mph. The comet, technically known as  C/2012 S1,  will pass within 1.1 million miles of Earth seven months from now, and it could be visible with the naked eye if it doesn't break up passing by the sun. It could be so bright, in fact, that it would outshine the full moon, according to...
SPORTS
By Dallas Morning News | January 24, 1994
IRVING, Texas -- The concussion that Dallas Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman suffered yesterday confused him more than any of the San Francisco 49ers' defenses did.Aikman took a knee to the helmet on the Cowboys' second offensive play of the third quarter. He stayed in for one more play, then went to the sideline, where team physician J. R. Zamorano had a revealing discussion with the star passer.Zamorano asked Aikman, "OK, what day is it?""I don't know.""Where are we?" the doctor said."I don't know."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
For years, scientists have suspected that the warm waters of the western Pacific Ocean play a key role in shaping the Earth's climate. But satellite data provided only a partial picture of what's happening in this remote region of the globe. Now, an international team of researchers, including several from Maryland, is engaged in an ambitious effort to quantify those natural processes, making dozens of flights in three aircraft from mid-January through February to track the gases and particles from the ocean as they rise into the upper atmosphere.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Old Moon, January's full moon, rises shortly before midnight Wednesday within three hours of the lunar apogee, making some call it a "micro moon". The moon reaches its furthest point in its orbit shortly before 9 p.m. At 11:52 p.m., the moon reaches its full phase. January's full moon is also known as the Full Wolf Moon or Moon after Yule. That coincidence will make it the smallest full moon of the year. At about 250,000 miles away, 4 percent further than the moon's average distance, it can appear about 14 percent smaller and 30 percent dimmer than a "super moon", a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or closest distance to Earth in orbit.
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