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By John-John Williams IV | July 26, 2011
Reginald Dowdy separated the strand of his customer's hair and slid a hollow bead-sized copper object to her scalp, leaving a black-and-white striped feather hanging. Dowdy's client, April McGill-Willhide, tilted her hair to the side and examined the bunch of multi-colored feathers that now outlined the side of her face. “It looks fantastic,” she exclaimed. “They're wonderful!” McGill-Willhide, a hair salon assistant, has a number of feather-accented earrings but wanted something more permanent that would allow her to look more current and chic.
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NEWS
Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
What if braces were considered fashionable and could actually boost a patient's self-esteem? That was the question on the minds of the daughters of a Columbia pediatric dentist when they hit upon the idea of Bracket Ears - earrings made from oversized, surgical steel brackets that come with colorful bands to match with your braces. And further, what if a portion of the profits was tied to charitable contributions? “I never imagined I would be doing this,” says Dr. Casey Crafton of Crafton Dental, located off Old Columbia Road in Kings Contrivance.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 16, 2007
I have had pierced ears for more than 25 years, yet I still can't wear most earrings, even expensive ones. After about an hour, my earlobes itch and become red and swollen. A few weeks ago, I purchased generic liquid bandage for paper cuts and decided to try it on my earlobes. I applied the product to the back and front of my earlobes, let it dry, then inserted the earrings. I was able to wear them for 10 hours without itching and my earlobes were not red. I have tried this with pairs I always reacted to and gotten the same good results.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
FRISCO, Texas -- In an effort to spur his players in the preseason, Towson football coach Rob Ambrose agreed to get one ear pierced and get fitted for an earring if the team reached the FCS title game. Reminded of that deal, the 43-year-old coach went jewelry shopping with his wife Friday evening. “I'm not having a midlife crisis,” Ambrose said. “But this afternoon, I'm going to get my ear pierced because I promised my kids that I would do that.” Although West said that the players had voted on a hoop earring that Michael Jordan had worn in the past, Ambrose said he wasn't sure which earring he was going to buy, which is why his wife Melissa accompanied him on the trip.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 7, 1992
DESPITE a deafening silence from the readers on many of the subjects explored here, it is high time that this column weigh in on the issue of men who wear earrings.For the record, let me say that as an enlightened citizen of the '90s, I see nothing wrong with a man jabbing a large hole in his earlobe, waiting a few days for the bleeding and subsequent raging infection to die down, and then sticking a cheap piece of metal in what used to be perfectly healthy skin tissue.If that is what you want to do with your ear (or ears)
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch | May 9, 1996
I grew up with a mother whose motto regarding her fake jewelry was "more is better." Maybe it's a rebellion against her, but I have very different tastes. The minimalism trend is for me, and I buy simply shaped clothes in neutral colors. But I realize I nTC do need some jewelry -- real jewelry. How do I go about building a jewelry wardrobe?I can understand your reaction against your mother's jewelry overload and think you are wise to start building a fine jewelry collection. For guidance I asked John Loring, the design director at Tiffany's, for suggestions.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | August 14, 1991
The "Earring Tour of Baltimore" was born on a sultry Saturday afternoon, when I asked two old friends from Texas what they wanted to see in my hometown.We had done a driving tour, starting out from the tree-lined streets of North Baltimore then heading downtown. They had seen Fell's Point and the Inner Harbor, eaten crab cakes and gelato. It seemed only polite to let them choose their next destination."Show us where you buy your earrings," Pam said promptly.Among my friends I am known for my earrings, a reputation born by default.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 17, 1992
With Donna Cuneo, you just never know. You may find the thirtysomething art director in penny loafers or gold pumps, black sequins or a basic turtleneck. As the woman responsible for WBAL-TV's image and identity, she has made a career out of being style-conscious. When she's not working at the station or unpacking boxes in her new Owings Mills home, she sews and makes jewelry.As for her own taste, "Most of the time, I'm pretty conservative . . . But I can surprise you."How would you describe your style?
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | May 30, 1991
A gem of a tipKeep your ears open for ways to save money! For less money and a bit more effort, you can save tens of dollars by making your own earrings.Here's how: A basic, dangling earring consists of an ear wire ohook, a pin-like base, and all the beads you can hang on it. And often you can make four or five pairs for the cost of a single pair of boutique-bought earrings.At Create-A-Hobby at Columbia Mall, for example, beads -crystal, plastic, wooden, metallic or seed -- cost from 2 cents per bead to about $5, says Anne Regan, store manager.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 21, 1993
I put together some columns of readers' gripes after my colleague Bob Greene did a series of heartwarming columns on what made people happy. I believe in journalistic balance.Let the venom flow:Newscasters who use the term "senseless murder" like there's such a thing as a sensible murder.When the mailman comes at a different time every day. I like order in my life.If Mr. Lender can't cut his bagels straight down the middle, then he should leave them uncut. I'm sick of crooked cut bagels getting stuck in my toaster every morning.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 18, 2013
The jewelry of Julie Ellyn Designs (www.JulieEllynDesigns.etsy.com) of Bel Air has been chosen for use on the CW Network's popular thriller "The Vampire Diaries," designer/owner Julie Ter Borg announced. This time, Caroline Forbes, played by Candice Accola, will wear the designer's "Fancy Clover (Caroline)" earrings on Episode 5:8, airing Thursday, Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. Leigh Leverett, wardrobe designer for "The Vampire Diaries," selected the earrings for use on the show after discovering them in a Stylist Gift Bag she received earlier this year from handcrafted arts promotion organization The Artisan Group, of which Ter Borg is a member.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Date: July 6, 2013 Kibibi's story: Kibibi Matthews, 33, was born in Baltimore. She is employed by the federal government and works in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Her father, Dr. Derrick Matthews, is a pediatrician at a hospital in Tanzania, and her mother, Dr. Dorothy Matthews, works in Tanzania in the international prevention of HIV/AIDS. Rianna's story: Rianna Brown, 33, grew up in Baltimore. She graduated from the University of Maryland School of Law in May 2012 and works for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV | July 26, 2011
Reginald Dowdy separated the strand of his customer's hair and slid a hollow bead-sized copper object to her scalp, leaving a black-and-white striped feather hanging. Dowdy's client, April McGill-Willhide, tilted her hair to the side and examined the bunch of multi-colored feathers that now outlined the side of her face. “It looks fantastic,” she exclaimed. “They're wonderful!” McGill-Willhide, a hair salon assistant, has a number of feather-accented earrings but wanted something more permanent that would allow her to look more current and chic.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Amy Matt says her friends often call her "J. Crew" because of her style. "If I have a collared shirt on, I definitely pop the collar," says the 33-year-old Paychex senior sales associate, with a laugh. However, the Pasadena resident describes her own style as more "mix and match. I like to have fun." And that she was having when we "glimpsed" Matt at the Tiki Barge in an emerald flutter sleeve top from The Limited, denim New York & Co. shorts, a gold snakeskin patterned leather belt from Banana Republic, and neutral metallic bangles from the BCBG outlet at Arundel Mills.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Canton resident Sarah Fries describes her style as "casual and eclectic. I like things that are very unique and stand out a bit." When we "glimpsed" the 23-year-old assistant coach of women's volleyball at University of Maryland, Baltimore County having a drink with friends at Nacho Mama's, she was wearing something that she "threw together at the last minute. It was warmer outside. So I wanted something that would keep me cool but I wouldn't look completely sloppy in." We think she "killed" it, to use the volleyball term.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
W hen the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation held its "35 Under 35 Finest" event at the B&O Railroad Museum, the 35 community volunteers being honored weren't the only winners. Anastasia Allen was a style standout in the crowd. The 31-year-old East Baltimore resident might work in a white coat during the day as a dental hygienist for Dr. Martin Levin, but she loves to dress up when she's on her own time. "Looking good always makes me feel better about myself," she says. Allen loves a "sexy chic" look, with a particular passion for handbags and shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 12, 1993
Like a bad penny, Madame De . . 's earrings keep coming back to her, each time bearing with them a whole new set of lies, deceptions and conspiracies, many of which the Madame herself has concocted.The two diamond danglers are the centerpiece of this swanky and sophisticated entertainment that hails from the far-ago year of 1953, one of the last films of the legendary Max Ophuls, cinema genius and big-time romantic fool. If Ophuls is remembered at all today, it is as the father of the great documentary filmmaker Marcel Ophuls ("The Sorrow and the Pity")
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 22, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- Players no longer can grow beards. Earrings are banished. Unfashionable and "experimental" haircuts are outlawed. Weightlifting and conditioning sessions are mandatory. And academic success has been declared the most important item on the agenda.Such were some of the things to come out of Maryland football coach Mark Duffner's first meeting with his players, held yesterday. For the most part, Duffner, who was hired from Holy Cross on Dec. 31, left a favorable impression with the Terps.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
Sharen Udell prefers wearing dark colors, but the hostess at Tapas Adela knows how to make her look stand out with pops of color and unusual accessories. "I'm not a designer person. I don't follow trends," says the 45-year-old Canton resident. "I like to put different stuff together to create my own look." The look: Red ribbed cotton-blend turtleneck Bebe sweater. Black asymmetrical cotton American Apparel skirt. Black fishnets. Black leather pointy-toe boots. Black rabbit fur pom-pom scarf.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2009
Creative types are everywhere at Ignite Baltimore, an event that features speakers giving five-minute presentations on eclectic topics. As 250 folks gathered at the Walters Art Museum for the most recent Ignite Baltimore, we "Glimpsed" an artfully dressed Katie McDonough Kutil. The 28-year-old co-owner of Chelle Paperie near Ruxton is a custom stationery and invitation designer. She describes her style as "creative with no fuss - super-simple pieces with fun details." And many of those details she creates herself.
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