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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 30, 2012
Earplugs are a must for all those who want an up-close look at the race cars in the Grand Prix of Baltimore this weekend, health officials are warning. “Using ear plugs preserves healthy hearing and doesn't take away from the excitement of the event,"said the Baltimore City health commissioner,Dr. Oxiris Barbot. She said exposure to loud noises over an extended period of time can cause hearing loss. That includes IndyCar races, music concerts and other loud events. Hearing loss can affect people of all ages, according to the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders . The groups says approximately 15 percent of Americans between aged 20 and 69 have some level of hearing loss that can be attributed to exposure to noises over 85 dB. Racing spectators are often exposed to noise above 96 dB to 110 dB, according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health . Look for the information kiosks this weekend because Grand Prix organizers say they will be providing ear plugs.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Sometimes it's the simplest ideas that have the biggest impact, and Dan Simon is hoping his will prevent the hearing damage suffered by thousands of military personnel - the top reported service disability in the war on terror. Simon, an engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, and several of his colleagues have modified a generic set of rubbery, orange earplugs to develop an inexpensive "Anti-Blast Earplug. " Simon says the device, which the team has tentatively named the ABLE, allows wearers to hear normally until there's an explosion, such as those created by an improvised explosive device, or IED, the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Sometimes it's the simplest ideas that have the biggest impact, and Dan Simon is hoping his will prevent the hearing damage suffered by thousands of military personnel - the top reported service disability in the war on terror. Simon, an engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, and several of his colleagues have modified a generic set of rubbery, orange earplugs to develop an inexpensive "Anti-Blast Earplug. " Simon says the device, which the team has tentatively named the ABLE, allows wearers to hear normally until there's an explosion, such as those created by an improvised explosive device, or IED, the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 30, 2012
Earplugs are a must for all those who want an up-close look at the race cars in the Grand Prix of Baltimore this weekend, health officials are warning. “Using ear plugs preserves healthy hearing and doesn't take away from the excitement of the event,"said the Baltimore City health commissioner,Dr. Oxiris Barbot. She said exposure to loud noises over an extended period of time can cause hearing loss. That includes IndyCar races, music concerts and other loud events. Hearing loss can affect people of all ages, according to the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders . The groups says approximately 15 percent of Americans between aged 20 and 69 have some level of hearing loss that can be attributed to exposure to noises over 85 dB. Racing spectators are often exposed to noise above 96 dB to 110 dB, according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health . Look for the information kiosks this weekend because Grand Prix organizers say they will be providing ear plugs.
FEATURES
By Diane Daniel and Diane Daniel,BOSTON GLOBE | July 27, 1997
Foam earplugs firmly in place, Charles Sielicki was ready to hear the band Tool at the Lollapalooza show in Mansfield, Mass. Between acts, the 39-year-old took out the plugs but said he'd be sure to reinsert them "just before the bands start."For Sielicki, who goes to about five concerts a summer, the turning point was an Aerosmith show two years ago. Since then, he said, he always wears earplugs. "I like the foam ones. They take the highs out."Noah Schaffer, 18, goes to several shows a week.
SPORTS
By David Steele | September 1, 2005
RAFAEL PALMEIRO is an American hero. In our time of national crisis, with death and devastation all over the Gulf Coast where Hurricane Katrina hit, we needed some levity, some comic relief to take our minds off the scenes from Louisiana and Mississippi. And into that void Tuesday night stepped a brave, lonely, sensitive man with a pair of earplugs. Earplugs. Because in the second road game in which Palmeiro had appeared in the month since his suspension for a positive steroids test, the Blue Jays fans that half-filled the open-roofed former SkyDome booed him loudly.
TRAVEL
By Ross Werland and Ross Werland,Tribune Newspapers | July 19, 2009
Name: : EarPollution NervePipes What they are: : Folding headphones that you can design on the Internet How they work: : The buyer visits EarPollution's Web site and selects from an array of colors and designs, including some rather funky choices - such as zebra - for the earpieces. The good: : As travel phones, they work well, because the earpieces are hinged to fold up toward the headset. Having broken two pairs of pricey rigid headphones already, I was eager to see if these could stand up to month after month in a briefcase, suffering the stress of books and bottles resting on top. They withstood all the jostling I could bring to bear.
FEATURES
April 23, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesPillow talkWhen Andrea Chapin and her daughter Amy Chapin Sucoff were planning Amy's wedding four years ago, they wanted to add a little creativity to the end of the ceremony. So, they decided that instead of having the groom step on a wineglass wrapped in a napkin at the end of the Jewish ceremony, they would design a pretty pillow to hold the glass and have him step on that.(The symbolic breaking of the glass is most popularly interpreted as a reminder of the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem.
FEATURES
By Kevin Sherrington and Kevin Sherrington,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 28, 1996
Nearly 40 years ago, a team of U.S. audiologists ventured into central Africa to test an old theory. They wanted to see if people who had never heard the shriek of a siren or the roar of a foundry or the clang, clang, clang of a trolley were all the better for it.The conclusion: Even the oldest members of the Mabaan tribe had better hearing than the average U.S. teen-ager.And the postscript: The loudest, most obnoxious noise the Mabaan hear is the harvest dance of their young people.And so it goes.
NEWS
By James Barron and James Barron,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2003
NEW YORK -- I was the first Confederate to die in the Battle of Central Park. At least, I think I was. I was just doing what I had been ordered to do -- hit the ground and play dead the moment the other side started firing. The other side was a line of Union uniforms with muskets and flags and earplugs and cell phones. We were a line of Confederate uniforms with muskets and flags and earplugs and cell phones. The idea was to re-enact the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Civil War engagement known as Gen. Robert E. Lee's greatest victory.
TRAVEL
By Ross Werland and Ross Werland,Tribune Newspapers | July 19, 2009
Name: : EarPollution NervePipes What they are: : Folding headphones that you can design on the Internet How they work: : The buyer visits EarPollution's Web site and selects from an array of colors and designs, including some rather funky choices - such as zebra - for the earpieces. The good: : As travel phones, they work well, because the earpieces are hinged to fold up toward the headset. Having broken two pairs of pricey rigid headphones already, I was eager to see if these could stand up to month after month in a briefcase, suffering the stress of books and bottles resting on top. They withstood all the jostling I could bring to bear.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 1, 2005
IT MIGHT BE one of the most entertaining games of the year ... if it mattered. The Ravens and Washington Redskins close out the preseason tonight in what might be a pretty attractive matchup if both coaches weren't more concerned with keeping their marquee players out of harm's way than getting a leg up in one of the NFL's closest regional rivalries. Ravens coach Brian Billick all but admitted yesterday that he already is focusing on the regular-season opener against the Indianapolis Colts, but he's very much in favor of making the Redskins a regular exhibition opponent - especially if the rivalry game can be scheduled a little earlier in the preseason.
SPORTS
By David Steele | September 1, 2005
RAFAEL PALMEIRO is an American hero. In our time of national crisis, with death and devastation all over the Gulf Coast where Hurricane Katrina hit, we needed some levity, some comic relief to take our minds off the scenes from Louisiana and Mississippi. And into that void Tuesday night stepped a brave, lonely, sensitive man with a pair of earplugs. Earplugs. Because in the second road game in which Palmeiro had appeared in the month since his suspension for a positive steroids test, the Blue Jays fans that half-filled the open-roofed former SkyDome booed him loudly.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. - Sergio Garcia was heading to the practice range yesterday morning at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, walking briskly past the fans who were standing behind a fence and clamoring for his autograph. Garcia quietly declined and kept moving. After he disappeared from sight, one fan muttered that the young Spaniard was big-timing him. "He wins one [last week's Buick Classic] and he won't talk to you," the man said. One thing you can count on at the 104th U.S. Open, which begins here today, is that the fans will talk - or worse - even if they're not being spoken to. Recent history says as much.
NEWS
By James Barron and James Barron,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2003
NEW YORK -- I was the first Confederate to die in the Battle of Central Park. At least, I think I was. I was just doing what I had been ordered to do -- hit the ground and play dead the moment the other side started firing. The other side was a line of Union uniforms with muskets and flags and earplugs and cell phones. We were a line of Confederate uniforms with muskets and flags and earplugs and cell phones. The idea was to re-enact the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Civil War engagement known as Gen. Robert E. Lee's greatest victory.
NEWS
December 24, 1999
If ringing in the new usually means ringing in your ears, a free set of earplugs might lessen the risk of permanent hearing loss.The Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance is mailing free earplugs to anyone who wants them.Music concerts and dance parties can produce sounds as high as 120 decibels. Under such conditions, doctors warn, hearing damage can occur in as little as seven to 10 minutes. If ringing persists in the ears after such occasions, doctors say, that indicates minute hair cells in the inner ear, which transmit sounds to the brain, might be dying.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 1, 2005
IT MIGHT BE one of the most entertaining games of the year ... if it mattered. The Ravens and Washington Redskins close out the preseason tonight in what might be a pretty attractive matchup if both coaches weren't more concerned with keeping their marquee players out of harm's way than getting a leg up in one of the NFL's closest regional rivalries. Ravens coach Brian Billick all but admitted yesterday that he already is focusing on the regular-season opener against the Indianapolis Colts, but he's very much in favor of making the Redskins a regular exhibition opponent - especially if the rivalry game can be scheduled a little earlier in the preseason.
FEATURES
By Diane Daniel and Diane Daniel,BOSTON GLOBE | July 27, 1997
Foam earplugs firmly in place, Charles Sielicki was ready to hear the band Tool at the Lollapalooza show in Mansfield, Mass. Between acts, the 39-year-old took out the plugs but said he'd be sure to reinsert them "just before the bands start."For Sielicki, who goes to about five concerts a summer, the turning point was an Aerosmith show two years ago. Since then, he said, he always wears earplugs. "I like the foam ones. They take the highs out."Noah Schaffer, 18, goes to several shows a week.
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