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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
The groundhog won't give his prognosis for spring's arrival for a few days, but AccuWeather.com meteorologists already foresee six more weeks of winter in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. The forecasting company's spring outlook calls for cold outbreaks and possible snow storms to continue into March. "For the next six weeks in the Northeast, we're going to be dealing with some pretty good cold coming down out of northern Canada," AccuWeather.com Lead Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said in a statement.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - With minor league spring training games starting today, Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold will begin making trips to the Twin Lakes Park complex for at-bats there. Orioles manager Buck Showalter said Reimold can have around 10 at-bats each day by going from field to field at the complex's cloverleaf as a designated hitter. There's no concern with Reimold, Showalter said, but the purpose is for the 30-year-old outfielder to get more plate appearances since he has been injured for a majority of the past two seasons.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Just as they do every April, the fruit orchards at Larriland Farm have donned their spring finery. The plum trees at the pick-your-own place in western Howard County sport brilliant white blossoms, while the peach trees are decked out in bright pink. Thing is, it's still March. Spring came early to Maryland, thanks to a run of unusually warm weather that awakened flowers, trees, birds and bees weeks ahead of schedule across much of the eastern United States. Larriland's fruit trees are flowering about a month earlier than usual, according to Lynn Moore, president of the family-run fruit and produce farm in Woodbine.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
The groundhog won't give his prognosis for spring's arrival for a few days, but AccuWeather.com meteorologists already foresee six more weeks of winter in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. The forecasting company's spring outlook calls for cold outbreaks and possible snow storms to continue into March. "For the next six weeks in the Northeast, we're going to be dealing with some pretty good cold coming down out of northern Canada," AccuWeather.com Lead Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said in a statement.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 11, 2002
Q. While I was on vacation, a weedy vine engulfed many of my flowers. My neighbor calls it bindweed. How can I get rid of it without damaging my flowers? A. Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis, is a perennial vine that looks and grows very much like morning glory. In fact, they are in the same family. If it gets established in beds, it will twine itself around your flowering plants and can be difficult to pull without damaging your flowers. It spreads not only by seed, but also by underground runners and is therefore difficult to control.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 8, 2007
Gene Heyler lives in Columbia, but he grew up in northern Pennsylvania, where they have names for early spring snowfalls. "There was usually the `Easter snow' ... within a week before or after Easter. After that there were snows named after the cold-weather vegetables, such as the `onion snow' ... I was wondering if there were any Maryland colloquial names for early spring snows." I've never heard of one. Neither has Sun columnist Fred Rasmussen, who would know. Readers? Oyster snow? Forsythia blossom snow?
NEWS
February 20, 2000
California and Florida kumquats are at their peak from November through February; and sometimes into early spring. Choose plump, firm fruit. Wrap loosely in plastic; they will keep in the fridge for up to a month. Candied kumquats can be used to decorate cakes or garnish frozen desserts. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
July 14, 1993
POLICE LOG* Kings Contrivance: 9700 block of Early Spring Way: Property valued at $540 was stolen from a green Toyota Camry Sunday night or early Monday.7400 block of Weather Worn Way: Someone threw 50 lawn chairs, 20 small chairs, five tables and other items into a pool at the Columbia Association between late Thursday and early Friday.* Owen Brown: 7000 block of Cradlerock Way: Someone ripped the convertible top off a blue 1974 Chevy Thursday or Friday. There was no sign of attempted theft, police said.
NEWS
By Kevin C. Thornton | August 29, 1995
In an office on a phoneI caught her in the viewfinderframed in binders and blinds.Her voice is little,so little it's a Bradford pear in early springblossoming softly, brilliantbut so short you only notice when it flowers.In an office of definitionsher tiny voice defies precision,it slips effortlessly into first positionand dances gaily on my toes.It's a squeak. Baby-powder softand so much stronger than I remember it being last week.There's me on this neutral phoneconnected and disconnected,the baby blooming in spring so soonI want to press her here against my earbefore the bloom passes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
Home sales in Maryland jumped 18.5 percent in May, increasing in nearly all counties and reflecting a surge of buyers who signed sales contracts during the early spring.But Realtors expect the brisk sales pace to slow in coming months because of recent increases in interest rates and a typically slower summer season.The number of new and existing-home sales settled last month rose to 4,660, from 3,931 in May 1993, the Maryland Association of Realtors said yesterday.In metropolitan Baltimore, sales in May had climbed 27 percent, the largest percentage in nearly 1 1/2 years, according to a separate report released earlier by the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Some very slow-moving gray bugs I call "skinny" stink bugs (not aggressive or biting) are getting inside from the floor or fireplace. Are they breeding in walls? My kids are scared of bugs, and I would love a safe solution. These docile insects may provide you with a good teachable moment for bug-shy kids. The leaf-footed pine seed bug looks similar to a slender stink bug but their interesting back legs resemble pointed oak leaves. They feed harmlessly on pine seeds and buds.
EXPLORE
By Jim Joyner and Kevin Dayhoff | March 25, 2013
The early spring snow falling on Carroll County overnight from Sunday into Monday has brought with it an extra vacation day for many local students. Carroll County Public Schools has announced that all public schools in the county are closed Monday due to the inclement weather. CCPS on Monday afternoon announced that a basketball game with the Harlem Wizards, originally scheduled for tonight at Manchester Valley High School, has been postponed until Saturday, April 13, at 7 p.m.  In addition, McDaniel College in Westminster has also closed for the day. The National Weather Service has a winter weather advisory issued for Carroll County through 6 p.m., and is forecasting that parts of the county could receive 3 to 5 inches of snow before the precipitation turns to rain this evening.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
When the Orioles open up spring training down in Sarasota two weeks from tomorrow, expect non-roster pitchers Mike Wright and Eduardo Rodriguez, who are among the organization's top pitching prospects, to be among those looking to make an impression in major league camp. With the World Baseball Classic pushing the beginning of spring training up a week, the Orioles likely limit some regulars, especially pitchers, when games begin on Feb. 23. That will give many of the Orioles' younger players an opportunity to make an impression during the opening days of the Grapefruit League season.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Just as they do every April, the fruit orchards at Larriland Farm have donned their spring finery. The plum trees at the pick-your-own place in western Howard County sport brilliant white blossoms, while the peach trees are decked out in bright pink. Thing is, it's still March. Spring came early to Maryland, thanks to a run of unusually warm weather that awakened flowers, trees, birds and bees weeks ahead of schedule across much of the eastern United States. Larriland's fruit trees are flowering about a month earlier than usual, according to Lynn Moore, president of the family-run fruit and produce farm in Woodbine.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 15, 2012
I saw a tweet recently noting that based on this week's temperatures, summer highs should be about 133 degrees. Just a joke (I hope), but seriously, some readers have asked: Are mild winters correlated with hot summers?  Yes and no. Baltimore summers average 74.9 degrees. Of Baltimore's 10 mildest winters, above-average summer heat followed eight of them (nine if you count 1880, which was 0.1 degrees above average). Here are the average temperatures for those summers (find the winter averages in this blog post )
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 13, 2012
If this week's weather is any indication, spring may be here for good a bit earlier than normal. Normal highs are about 53 degrees this time of year. The best chance for setting a new record comes Thursday, when the current record is 82 degrees, set in 1990. A record for the highest daily low is more within reach, with records of 54 degrees and 56 degrees Wednesday and Thursday. Thursday morning is forecast to start out at 53 degrees, while Wednesday could be a bit colder with a 48-degree low. A record could be close.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 13, 1994
For many years, a rite of late winter and early spring for anglers along Maryland's Atlantic coast was a headboat trip offshore for Atlantic mackerel. For the past few years, the spring trips have been less than spectacular, and last year the mackerel run never developed.This year, almost midway into March, the mackerel are still absent.Vaughn Anthony, a scientist with the National Marine Fisheries Service Northeast Scientific Center in Woods Hole, Mass., said Friday that although the mackerel have been coming inshore less predictably in recent years, the coastal population is still in // great shape.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | March 18, 2007
Those of us who have hunted morel mushrooms in the early spring have hunted indeed! The morel is among nature's most elusive species. Here Jane Whitledge of Minnesota captures the morel's mysterious ways. - Ted Kooser "Moral Mushrooms" Softly they come thumbing up from firm ground protruding unharmed. Easily crumbled and yet how they shouldered the leaf and mold aside, rising unperturbed, breathing obscurely, still as stone. By the slumping log, by the dappled aspen, they grow alone.
EXPLORE
March 7, 2012
An article in the March 8, 1962, edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported the near completion of a new police station. The new Wilkens Police Station, which will combine the services of the Catonsville and Halethorpe police stations and the Traffic Division, is nearing completion at Wilkens and Walker avenues. Occupancy of the one-story and basement structure is anticipated about May 1 of this year. The personnel of the Catonsville and Halethorpe Districts, totaling 71 men, includes: Captain Clarence Bradley ; four lieutenants, George Neeb, Joseph Schwartz, Robert Andrews and Frederick Senkel ; 66 sergeants, corporals and patrolmen.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
The size of 833 ordinary groundhogs, Tuffy the African elephant steps slowly from barn to holding pen, oblivious to his looming place in Maryland meteorological predictions. If he sees his massive shadow, winter soon will end. If not, it's six more weeks of dreary skies, mush and slop and cold nights without power. That Phil, the groundhog in Punxsutawney, has predicted an early spring matters not to Tuffy. He's an elephant and cannot read. If there's a shadow to be cast, Tuffy is up to the tusk, er, task.
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