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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
An Anne Arundel circuit judge has rejected a request by Terrence Johnson for an order to release him, saying appeals of such a ruling would be tied up in the courts longer than the month remaining on Johnson's prison sentence.Johnson, who was convicted of one count of manslaughter in the shooting deaths of two Prince George's County police officers in 1978, was told Aug. 11 that he would be released in February if he completed 90 days of work-release.Attorney Melvin White said he also was told by a Parole Commission lawyer that his client could be released earlier if he completed the work-release agreement before Feb. 1. Johnson completed his work release Sunday.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
The U.S. Justice Department's announcement last week that it would seek clemency applications from thousands of federal prisoners was a major departure for an administration that has made minimal use of its powers to grant inmates early release. But the potential freeing of thousands of inmates is not completely unknown for the federal justice system — and advocates for shorter sentences say experience shows prisoners can be released without harming the public. Previous changes to sentencing rules have led to early release for tens of thousands of inmates serving time for crack convictions.
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NEWS
By Eileen Canzian | October 13, 1990
When he was released from prison last spring after serving time on drug charges, Stephen A. Brown did everything the correction system asked of him.He got a job with a construction company. He checked in regularly with his probation officer. He seemed to be adjusting.But the 40-year-old Suitland man was sent back to prison last week after Maryland correction officials discovered that they had made a mistake when they let him go in April. He should not have been released until November, officials said yesterday.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
After Gregg Thomas pleaded guilty in 2004 to killing a teenager, a Baltimore judge ordered him to serve 15 years in prison. He was out in less than 10, and by last week he had been charged in the shooting ambush of off-duty Baltimore Police Sgt. Keith Mcneill. The shooting, which left Mcneill in critical condition, put the spotlight on a poorly understood feature of corrections policy that reduces most Maryland sentences. Thomas was able to leave prison early because he had received credit for good behavior and had completed work and education programs that helped him shave off more than a third of his sentence.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Twenty-one years after he was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his aunt, a Pasadena man appeared in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court yesterday to ask that his sentence be modified. Allen Finke, 50, was convicted in 1982 of stabbing to death Leonette Shilling in her home in 1979. Finke said he murdered his aunt after breaking into her home to steal money. Startled that she was home baby-sitting her 3-year-old nephew, Finke, high on marijuana, stabbed Shilling 11 times. In April, reversing an earlier opinion, Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth granted Finke a sentence modification hearing.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
It took 18 months, but the state has fired former prison records supervisor John Patrick O'Donnell for the early release of killer John F. Thanos.In an 82-page decision, Administrative Law Judge Kenneth S. Watson, ordered that Mr. O'Donnell be dismissed and never again hired by the state. He was found to have violated a handful of administrative personnel regulations, stemming from the 1990 release of Thanos 18 months early from the Eastern Correctional Institution in Somerset County.Five months after his April 5, 1990, release, Thanos went on a crime spree during which he killed three teen-agers.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff William Thompson contributed to this story | September 19, 1990
State prison officials are investigating why John Frederick Thanos, who is accused of two murders and faces charges in a third slaying, was released from an Eastern Shore prison last April after serving less than four years of a seven-year robbery sentence.Gov. William Donald Schaefer, campaigning in Frederick yesterday, said, "There is a thorough investigation going on . . . about how he got out."Schaefer refused to provide details of the inquiry, except to say that its results may not be available for several days.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1996
The county's new growth-control law hasn't taken effect yet, and already developers are tangling with the county planning director over how to interpret it."We'll have our lawyers meet your lawyers," Richard L. Hull, president of Carroll Land Services Inc., told Planning Director Philip Rovang yesterday during an impromptu discussion of the new law.The meeting was amicable until Mr. Rovang sought to explain a clause that would allow a developer to apply for an "early release" from most of the restrictions of the growth-control legislation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
An Edgewater man with more than a dozen drunken driving convictions won a slight reduction in prison time on Friday, but it came with a stiff warning from the judge, who promised to incarcerate him for a year for any infraction of his probation."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 1996
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Celebrity attorney F. Lee Bailey was still in federal prison last night, awaiting word from a sphinxlike judge as to whether he can hope for early release from a six-month sentence for contempt of court.But even though a federal prosecutor pronounced himself satisfied with an agreement whereby Mr. Bailey would win his freedom in exchange for handing over $3 million in stocks and cash owed to the government, the most that U.S. District Judge Maurice Paul would do yesterday was offer a curt promise to consider Mr. Bailey's plea.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
The State Board of Education granted Anne Arundel County Public Schools' request last week to waive the 180-day school calendar requirement for Southern Middle School, allowing classes to end on Thursday, June 13. School officials said the early closing is needed to help facilitate the move of Lothian Elementary School into space at Southern Middle while the new Lothian Elementary is built over the next two years. Southern joins eight other schools with similar early closings — Annapolis High School, Central and Severn River middle schools, Phoenix Academy and Crofton, Lothian, Mills-Parole and Point Pleasant elementary schools.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
The death penalty can never be abolished ( "Death penalty's cruel toll on the victims," Feb. 27). Sadly, some of our law enforcement personnel are forced to shoot to kill, so there are "executions" without judge or jury. Then there are the cases, like just recently, where two incarcerated felons were found murdered. There was also the case of a felon murdering another on a bus when they were being transported. As for the fear that some innocent person might be executed by mistake, what about the true innocents who are murdered by those who have murdered before?
SPORTS
January 13, 2011
Champions Tour golfer Jim Thorpe, imprisoned since April for failing to pay income taxes, has told a friend he's on track for an early release later this month. Barring complications, Mike Lewis said Wednesday, Thorpe is scheduled for a Jan. 26 release from the minimum-security Federal Prison Camp located at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Ala. Thorpe's first stop would be an Orlando-area halfway house, then home sentencing while he works at a local golf course.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel , Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
An Anne Arundel County judge refused Wednesday to give the killer of a woman who had befriended him a second chance to serve part of his sentence out of prison, saying that Christopher Perkins O'Brien was behind bars because he did not heed conditions of his previous release. O'Brien asked to be let out early because he has been assaulted and threatened behind bars, and has finished counseling programs. But leaving prison this week would have had him out just six months ahead of his expected mandatory release in May; a parole hearing this month also could lead to early freedom.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
An Anne Arundel County judge refused Wednesday to give the killer of a woman who had befriended him a second chance to serve part of his sentence out of prison, saying that Christopher Perkins O'Brien was behind bars because he did not heed conditions of his previous release. O'Brien asked to be let out early because he has been assaulted and threatened behind bars, and has finished counseling programs. But leaving prison this week would have had him out just six months ahead of his expected mandatory release in May; a parole hearing this month also could lead to early freedom.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | November 26, 2008
Former NFL quarterback Michael Vick pleaded guilty yesterday to a state dogfighting charge in Sussex, Va., clearing the way for him to potentially leave a federal prison early and attempt a pro football comeback. Vick, 28, was sentenced to three years of suspended jail time, none of which will be added to his 23-month federal prison sentence as long as he stays out of trouble for four years. The three-year sentence was far less than the maximum of 10 years he could have faced. Vick arrived wearing wrist and ankle shackles with his gray suit, but the restraints were removed by the time he entered his plea.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 12, 1990
There's a joke among Maryland prison officials about the Division of Correction's preparing for the 21st century -- just as soon as it enters the 20th.It is a wry remark born out of frustration with a system notorious for its foot-dragging despite promises to speed things up.In the past two months, for instance, there has been talk but little action by state officials on resolving problems with the process of calculating sentence lengths -- a process that recently allowed the mistaken early release of two inmates who were charged individually later with killing a total of four people.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
Eight years ago, Judge Robert A. Silkworth gave Karl Johnson a break. The Anne Arundel County judge had sentenced the Severna Park man, who had been convicted of battery and second-degree rape of two young girls who considered him an uncle, to serve a little more than half of a 15-year prison term but released him at age 21 after slightly more than two years behind bars. Johnson couldn't stay out of trouble. He threatened his probation officer and was convicted of assaulting a Baltimore police officer in a nightclub and harassing his ex-fiancee.
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