Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEarly Childhood Education
IN THE NEWS

Early Childhood Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
Starting this fall, students at Anne Arundel Community College interested in early childhood education will be able to get an associate's degree that will qualify them for jobs in the child care field.The Maryland Higher Education Commission has approved the 60-credit career program, college officials said."The idea is to get the students to know the stages of child development, both physically and emotionally," said Rosemary Wolfe, chairwoman of the college's education department.After their course work is completed, students will receive an associate's degree in early childhood education that will qualify them for jobs such as director of a child care center, junior teacher in prekindergarten classes, preschool teacher and instructional aide in nursery, kindergarten or at the elementary level.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Patricia R. Amass, a retired Carroll County educator and volunteer who focused her efforts on those living in Third World countries, died Monday of abdominal cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 78. "Pat defined the statement of what a professional colleague and a dedicated teacher is. We need more educators in this world who had her sort of dedication," said Francis "Skip" Fennell, professor of education at McDaniel College and a friend of nearly 40 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2012
Phyllis Teather-Burke, a longtime Baltimore County public school educator whose specialty was early-childhood education, died Wednesday of cancer at her Glen Arm home. She was 77. "She was an outstanding educator who had a deep commitment to children," said former state Superintendent Nancy L. Grasmick, who retired in 2011. "She was a highly respected and an amazing educator. " The daughter of a businessman and an educator, the former Phyllis Burke was born in Valhalla, N.Y., and settled with her family in Reisterstown in 1942.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
With the proposed omnibus spending bill, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has provided the leadership that demonstrates how Congress is supposed to work ("Bill keeps government open, gives millions to Md.," Jan. 14). The bill provides for restrained government spending but it provides investment in critical areas such as early childhood education, infrastructure and medical research, and it has bipartisan Congressional and White House support. Maryland and the entire nation will benefit from Senator Mikulski's ability to get things done as the chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
NEWS
October 8, 1994
Wallace Hamilton Kuralt, 86, retired social worker and father of TV newsman Charles Kuralt, died Thursday of cancer and respiratory failure in Elizabeth City, N.C. The Outer Banks resident was a strong advocate of early childhood education, and he instituted family planning services long before such programs won national acceptance.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
Judith Elaine Hoyer, a Prince George's County school official and wife of Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, died of cancer yesterday morning at her home in Mechanicsville, St. Mary's County. She was 57.Mrs. Hoyer was coordinating supervisor of early childhood education for the public schools in Prince George's, whose former county executive, Gov. Parris N. Glendening, issued a written statement remembering her efforts."We are, of course, well aware of the many contributions ofCongressman Hoyer to this State," Mr. Glendening said of the 5th District Democrat.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
Arnold teacher named as TSU department chairJoan Hildebrand of Arnold has been appointed chairwoman of Towson State University's early childhood education department for 1993-1994.Dr. Hildebrand, an assistant professor of early childhood education, has served as the department's interim chairwoman since September.She earned her bachelor's degree from Shippensburg State College in Pennsylvania, and her master's and doctorate in education from the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Hildebrand joined the Towson faculty in 1989.
NEWS
By Mark Berey, Susan C. Keating and and David Rutstein | September 26, 2000
THE MARYLAND STATE Board of Education recently announced that it will seek to institute all-day kindergarten statewide. Though this worthwhile initiative will provide an important boost for many children and families, we should, at the same time, seize an even greater opportunity to help children succeed in school. Because of the recent convergence of two fields of research, we now know that one of the greatest influences on educational achievement is the quality of a child's experiences from birth to age 5, before he or she enters school.
NEWS
December 29, 2008
President-elect Barack Obama's pledge last week to spend $10 billion on early childhood education could have a huge impact on schools in Baltimore. A new infusion of federal education dollars, the largest since the Head Start program was established in 1965, could allow the city to significantly expand its prekindergarten and Head Start programs and make a huge difference in the lives of city schoolchildren. At present, only about 4,200 of the city's 6,500 4-year-olds are enrolled in pre-K programs, where eligibility is determined by family income.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on early childhood education, I object to the idea that my tax dollars should support the pre-K instruction for 3- and 4-year-olds in Maryland, as advocated by several announced candidates for governor ( "The most important investment," Oct. 8). With a bit of creative parenting, children who are nurtured and loved by their own families during these formative years will be just as ready for kindergarten as those who were forced to attend school at age 3 or 4. Parents are able to access available resources at the public library or on the computer, and play groups or going to the playground provide socialization.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler suggested Thursday capping the amount of casino cash given to the horse racing industry and spending the rest on early childhood education, an investment Gansler said would be among his most important priorities if he is elected governor. Gansler, a Democrat, expanded on his idea to offer full-day preschool to disadvantaged children, saying his long-term goal would be to allow every 4-year-old to start public school a year before kindergarten in a state-run pre-K program.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Maryland received a new No. 1 title for Gov. Martin O'Malley to crow about Wednesday as the Center for American Progress ranked its the best of the 50 states for women. And crow the governor did, releasing a statement saying he and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown were "thrilled" by the distinction. “Working together, we have made great strides in making Maryland a great place for women to live, lead, and learn," O'Malley said. The ranking is unlikely to impress conservatives because the Center for American Progress is a liberal group that counted such things as unimpeded access to abortion services and contraception among its criteria for a positive rating.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
I understand the egos of elected officials, but can't any of them refrain from having their names printed everywhere from envelopes to highway signs? Whatever the name is printed on was not "brought to you by" so-and-so official. Rather, it was paid for by all of the citizens who pay taxes. Save our money and be kinder to the environment by refraining from reprinting everything after each election. Let's put the savings toward increased funding for more important things, such as early childhood education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | July 9, 2013
Getting children ready to read and do math has usually begun in pre-school, but there's a new idea that perhaps it should start in the womb. Sara Neufeld, a former Baltimore Sun education reporter, has written about one such attempt in Chicago to empower mothers with information to make good decisions about their children's futures. Her story in The Atlantic  looks at attempts to arm young mothers with a host of knowledge and skills that allows them to better nurture and advocate for their children.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
I understand the egos of elected officials, but can't any of them refrain from having their names printed everywhere from envelopes to highway signs? Whatever the name is printed on was not "brought to you by" so-and-so official. Rather, it was paid for by all of the citizens who pay taxes. Save our money and be kinder to the environment by refraining from reprinting everything after each election. Let's put the savings toward increased funding for more important things, such as early childhood education.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
Sister Barbara Tucker, who taught kindergarten in an Arbutus parochial school, died of a stroke Jan. 30 at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Huntingdon Valley, Pa. She was 66. Born in Philadelphia, she entered her Roman Catholic religious order, Grey Nuns of the Sacred Heart, in 1958 in Elkins Park, Pa. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from D'Youville College in Buffalo, N.Y., and a master's degree in early childhood education from the University of...
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 3, 2013
Jobs are returning with depressing slowness, and most of the new jobs pay less than the jobs that were lost in the Great Recession. Economic determinists assume that globalization and technological advancement necessarily condemn a large portion of the American workforce to underemployment and stagnant wages, while rewarding those with the best educations and connections with ever higher wages and wealth. Many on the right of the political spectrum say we should accept this outcome because we mustn't interfere with the free market.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
A new report showing Maryland schools now lead the nation in efforts to boost student achievement levels has vindicated the commitment the state made more than a decade ago to adequately fund education and adopt smart policy choices that return the biggest bang for the buck. The study by Education Sector, a Washington-based think tank that tracks school reform efforts across the country, suggests that Maryland's thoughtful approach to improving education opportunities for all the state's children has positioned it to register even greater gains in the future.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.