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NEWS
March 15, 2013
As we struggle through the fifth year of recession, facing budget cuts, austerity and now the sequester, it may be a good time to re-evaluate our national priorities. Last year, the Reach Out and Read program that distributes books to low-income children from 6 months to 5 years lost its federal grant and this year the Head Start program is being cut back. These cuts will be borne by our most vulnerable citizens. These cuts come at a time when there is a growing mountain of evidence that the seeds for our health are sown in the first years of life.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Sister Mary Julie Gill, a member of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and a retired educator, died June 4 of respiratory failure at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. She was 87. Julia Gill was born and raised in Philadelphia. She was a graduate of Philadelphia's Moylan High School, which was run by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. She entered the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur at Ilchester in 1941 and professed her final vows in 1949. Sister Julie earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1962 from what is now Trinity University in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Under Armour has agreed to a multi-year partnership with Fight For Children, a non-profit working to improve early childhood and K-12 education. The Baltimore-based sports apparel brand said Tuesday it will serve as the presenting sponsor of the group's annual Fight Night fundraising event, now in its 25 t h year. The Washington fund-raiser attracts 2,000 attendees from business, government, entertainment and community service for a night of entertainment and professional boxing.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening is proposing an 8.5 percent increase in spending on Maryland's public schools next year, including a $30 million initiative aimed at boosting early childhood achievement. The governor's $2.57 billion education package, released yesterday, also includes his acceptance of a $55 million settlement offer from Baltimore officials to end the latest round of legal wrangling over state aid to the city system. Glendening said his spending plan - a significant boost over the 6 percent increase the state's schools saw this year - demonstrated his commitment to education as a top priority.
NEWS
September 5, 2000
WE'VE GOT OUR priorities skewed. Ninety percent of the money for education in this country gets spent teaching kids older than 4. Yet 90 percent of a child's brain development takes place before age 5. That's why it's so important that Gov. Parris N. Glendening accept the State Board of Education's recommendation that Maryland spend $21 million next year to begin phasing in all-day kindergarten in every school. One study shows that for every $1 spent on early childhood programs, the government reduces costs by $7 for special education, remedial teaching in later years and social services.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2001
One of the nation's leading early childhood researchers told a General Assembly committee yesterday that the most effective way Maryland could improve reading achievement would be to offer full-day kindergarten in all elementary schools. "Given we only have so much money, and we only have so much data, the biggest bump for the resources would probably be full-day kindergarten," said G. Reid Lyon of the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development. Lyon's analysis offered support to state and local education advocates who went before the House Ways and Means Committee to urge that Gov. Parris N. Glendening find funds for a plan to phase in full-day kindergarten across Maryland within three to five years.
NEWS
May 14, 1996
Harriet H. S. Steinberg, 75, early childhood specialistA memorial service for Harriet H. S. Steinberg, a retired childhood development specialist in the Baltimore public school system, will be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 7401 Park Heights Ave.Mrs. Steinberg died April 13 of cancer at her home in Mount Washington. She was 75.Her concern for the plight of underprivileged and handicapped children began in the 1930s, when she worked with an aunt who operated a free camp in Western PHOTO Maryland for needy children.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2000
Brain research is supporting the belief of many early childhood educators that the preschool years can be key to a child's success in school. A meeting last week of the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI), held in Baltimore, featured a number of sessions on ways to enrich educational experiences for young children. Ellen Cromwell, founder-principal of Georgetown Hill Early Childhood Center in Rockville, believes that a balance between intellectual stimulation and leisurely play is the best way to enhance a child's development.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
Barbara D. Finberg, 76, whose management of the Carnegie Corp. of New York helped introduce educational programs for early childhood, including television shows such as Sesame Street, died Saturday at her home in Manhattan. Ms. Finberg, who had breast cancer, died of respiratory failure, the Carnegie Corp. said. For more than 20 years, as a program officer and later as executive vice president of the Carnegie Corp., Ms. Finberg oversaw at least $100 million in grants given by the foundation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Patricia R. Amass, a retired Carroll County educator and volunteer who focused her efforts on those living in Third World countries, died Monday of abdominal cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 78. "Pat defined the statement of what a professional colleague and a dedicated teacher is. We need more educators in this world who had her sort of dedication," said Francis "Skip" Fennell, professor of education at McDaniel College and a friend of nearly 40 years.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TITTLE-TATTLE However reluctant we may be to admit it, and however much we may regret it, much of today's journalism amounts to petty, idle gossip, scantily sourced trivial chatter. It shows in our obsession with celebrities, a broadly defined category, and it cheapens what passes for political discourse.  A word for that, tittle-tattle , has been around since the early sixteenth century, so the phenomenon is hardly novel.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
As we struggle through the fifth year of recession, facing budget cuts, austerity and now the sequester, it may be a good time to re-evaluate our national priorities. Last year, the Reach Out and Read program that distributes books to low-income children from 6 months to 5 years lost its federal grant and this year the Head Start program is being cut back. These cuts will be borne by our most vulnerable citizens. These cuts come at a time when there is a growing mountain of evidence that the seeds for our health are sown in the first years of life.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Scientists have long known that the human mind develops most rapidly during the first five years of life, a point President Barack Obama underscored in his State of the Union address when he urged states to provide universal access to high-quality pre-kindergarten programs. Investment in early childhood education is an investment in the nation's future, and Maryland is well-positioned to heed the president's call. Children who attend high-quality, public pre-K arrive at school better equipped with the cognitive and social skills needed for learning, and there is a large body of evidence suggesting that they retain that advantage throughout their school careers and beyond.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 6, 2013
Two Baltimore city lawmakers have proposed legislation that would draw funding from the state's lottery revenue to support expanding early childhood education programs. The legislation would create a program called "Race to the Tots," -- named after the federal "Race to the Top" program- - and allow local districts to compete for grants that would "stimulate innovation for and expand access to high-quality early childhood education in Maryland," according to a release sent jointly by the bill's sponsors Sen. Bill Ferguson and Del. Sandy Rosenberg.
NEWS
September 10, 2011
As an early childhood professional, I was disturbed by your Page 2 photo of a kindergarten class "demonstrating standing-in-line skills during a bathroom break" ("Underway at last," Sept. 7). It's a pity The Sun chose to promote this ineffective transitional activity. It is developmentally inappropriate to expect young children to stand in line, keep quiet, keep their hands to themselves and do absolutely nothing while waiting to use the bathroom. If it is necessary to take a group of children in line, there are many transitional activities that can serve to engage kids in learning opportunities during such daily routines.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Over the past decade many studies have reached the conclusion that investing in high-quality early childhood education is a successful hedge against poverty. Students who attend Head Start, America's comprehensive early childhood education and development program for poor children, are far better prepared to learn when they enter kindergarten. They are referred for special education services less frequently and they are also more likely to graduate high school. As adults they are less likely to be incarcerated and more likely to be successful, contributing members of society than those who do not attend such programs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
Cascelia S. "Cici" Burgess, the Baltimore school system's director of early intervention programs and services, who was an educator in the city for 38 years, died Sept. 20 of a heart attack at her Northeast Baltimore home. She was 61. "The one thing that everybody knows is that she had an undying love for children. And as a special early ed teacher, Cici did all she could to help with resources and whatever else was needed," said Sandra A. "Sam" Means, an administrator at Maritime Industries Academy High School.
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