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Earl Warren

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By David Belin | March 23, 1992
FORMER Chief Justice Earl Warren, one of the great Americans of this century, is being honored by the issuance of a new postage stamp.At one time he was best known for his leadership in breaking down the barriers of discrimination through the landmark decision of Brown vs. Board of Education.But today's young Americans know him best as he is portrayed in the Warner Brothers film "J.F.K.": as a liar, an incompetent and as someone who participated in a cover-up of the truth about the assassination of President Kennedy.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 2007
The Republican presidential debate at Morgan State University ended around 10:30ish Thursday night when I rose from my seat in the Carl Murphy Auditorium and announced to no one in particular, "Boy! That certainly was more fun than skydiving!" I trust you will forgive me for that bit of hyperbole. But the debate among the six Republican candidates considered to have little or no chance at the presidential nomination did have moments both entertaining and informative, so much so I'm inclined to hand out some awards.
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NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | April 15, 1991
IMAGINE AMERICA in 1991 with the South still rigidly segregated and blacks playing no meaningful part in Southern political life. Imagine small numbers of rural voters controlling most of our state legislatures. Imagine America under a deadening repression of free speech and ideas.That is the country we might have had except for one thing: the service of Earl Warren as chief justice of the United States.Warren was born 100 years ago last month. The centennial has just been celebrated by his law school, Boalt Hall at the University of California at Berkeley, and by the University of California at San Diego.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 9, 2003
THE YEAR 2003 marks the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Marbury vs. Madison. So let's whoop it up and celebrate. What's that? What's Marbury vs. Madison, and why should we care? If Samuel L. Banks, my City College history teacher, were around, he'd simply give us all a look of equal parts bewilderment and amusement, and gently chide, "But you should know this." Some 27 years ago, we celebrated the Bicentennial, whooping up the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By David Hanners and David Hanners,Dallas Morning News | September 19, 1993
DALLAS -- The public will get its first taste of Lyndon B. Johnson's often-fiery telephone conversations in the days after the Kennedy assassination when the long-secret tapes are released this week.The Lyndon B. Johnson Library said Friday that transcripts of about 275 phone calls from November and December 1963 would be made available Wednesday, both in Austin and at the National Archives in Washington.Lewis Gould, a University of Texas history professor who helped review the tapes, said Friday that, although they contain a few historical tidbits, "Johnson's personality is going to impress people, more than any clues to the Kennedy assassination."
NEWS
By Carl P. Leubsdorf and Carl P. Leubsdorf,Washington bureau chief of the Dallas Morning News | July 8, 1991
MY MOST vivid childhood memory of the Supreme Court was the 'Impeach Earl Warren' signs which lined Highway 17 near Savannah," Judge Clarence Thomas recalled last week."I didn't quite understand who this Earl Warren fellow was, but I knew he was in some kind of trouble," Thomas added.Chief Justice Warren, of course, was "in some kind of trouble" among white Southerners for the 1954 school desegregation decision, one in a series of landmark rulings over his 16-year tenure that changed the conditions under which black Georgians like Clarence Thomas lived.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | April 28, 1992
THE FOLLOWING is from a cassette tape found under the pantry steps behind the Supreme Court building. Eight distinctive male voices are heard and one female. Fortunately, none can be identified with certainty:Male Voice One: Did anybody get a pastrami on white with mayonnaise and lettuce? I ordered pastrami with mayo and -- would you look at this revolting sandwich, Chief? Corned beef on rye with mustard. They must think we're writing a Broadway musical here instead of interpreting a Constitution.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 12, 1990
APROPOS of the nomination of David Souter to the Supreme Court, Edward B. Sandler wrote in to ask:"How many bachelors have sat on the Supreme Court? How many appointees have disappointed their president -- how many Warrens and Brennans?"First question. That's easy to answer. Only five of the 103 men and one woman justices were bachelors. The five were William Henry Moody, James McReynolds, John Herrin Clarke, Benjamin Cardozo and Francis Murphy. You could look it up in Congressional Quarterly's "Guide to the U.S. Supreme Court," the standard reference work.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | October 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the first time in a half-century, the Supreme Court's marble facade is getting a scrubbing. But the court's new look as another term opens tomorrow is even more visible inside: For the first time in generations, there will be no liberal activist on the bench.It was not long after the Supreme Court moved into its brand new marble temple on Capitol Hill in October 1935 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt began naming the justices who in time would form the core of the activist and liberal "Earl Warren Court."
NEWS
September 22, 1996
It takes a revisionist to know oneJ. Bradford Coker, in his letter in the Sept. 1 "Howard Viewpoints," refers to Norris West's distortion of the record "as just another example of ignorance in the media providing us with revisionist history to support an editorial viewpoint."Talk about the pot and the kettle. Mr. Coker plays fast and loose with historical fact when he condescendingly says, "Mr. West may not know this, but," and then goes on to make some statements about President Eisenhower which, while technically true as stated, are very misleading without context.
NEWS
September 22, 1996
It takes a revisionist to know oneJ. Bradford Coker, in his letter in the Sept. 1 "Howard Viewpoints," refers to Norris West's distortion of the record "as just another example of ignorance in the media providing us with revisionist history to support an editorial viewpoint."Talk about the pot and the kettle. Mr. Coker plays fast and loose with historical fact when he condescendingly says, "Mr. West may not know this, but," and then goes on to make some statements about President Eisenhower which, while technically true as stated, are very misleading without context.
NEWS
July 11, 1994
North & McCarthyYour editorial, "Virginia's Battle Royal" (June 7), was further evidence of the desperation that anti-Oliver North partisans are showing in their attempt to keep the dreaded Mr. North out of the U.S. Senate.The comparison of him to Sen. Joseph McCarthy shows that, with the campaign barely under way, the bottom of the barrel has already been reached.Trying to invoke the specter of Senator McCarthy to attack Colonel North, however, is not the great trump card that some people might be inclined to believe it is.Despite the conventional myth that Senator McCarthy was the reckless smearer of innocents, a careful examination of the situation shows that he was not the irresponsible inquisitor of liberal legend.
NEWS
By David Hanners and David Hanners,Dallas Morning News | September 19, 1993
DALLAS -- The public will get its first taste of Lyndon B. Johnson's often-fiery telephone conversations in the days after the Kennedy assassination when the long-secret tapes are released this week.The Lyndon B. Johnson Library said Friday that transcripts of about 275 phone calls from November and December 1963 would be made available Wednesday, both in Austin and at the National Archives in Washington.Lewis Gould, a University of Texas history professor who helped review the tapes, said Friday that, although they contain a few historical tidbits, "Johnson's personality is going to impress people, more than any clues to the Kennedy assassination."
NEWS
By Russell Baker | April 28, 1992
THE FOLLOWING is from a cassette tape found under the pantry steps behind the Supreme Court building. Eight distinctive male voices are heard and one female. Fortunately, none can be identified with certainty:Male Voice One: Did anybody get a pastrami on white with mayonnaise and lettuce? I ordered pastrami with mayo and -- would you look at this revolting sandwich, Chief? Corned beef on rye with mustard. They must think we're writing a Broadway musical here instead of interpreting a Constitution.
NEWS
By David Belin | March 23, 1992
FORMER Chief Justice Earl Warren, one of the great Americans of this century, is being honored by the issuance of a new postage stamp.At one time he was best known for his leadership in breaking down the barriers of discrimination through the landmark decision of Brown vs. Board of Education.But today's young Americans know him best as he is portrayed in the Warner Brothers film "J.F.K.": as a liar, an incompetent and as someone who participated in a cover-up of the truth about the assassination of President Kennedy.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | October 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the first time in a half-century, the Supreme Court's marble facade is getting a scrubbing. But the court's new look as another term opens tomorrow is even more visible inside: For the first time in generations, there will be no liberal activist on the bench.It was not long after the Supreme Court moved into its brand new marble temple on Capitol Hill in October 1935 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt began naming the justices who in time would form the core of the activist and liberal "Earl Warren Court."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 9, 2003
THE YEAR 2003 marks the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Marbury vs. Madison. So let's whoop it up and celebrate. What's that? What's Marbury vs. Madison, and why should we care? If Samuel L. Banks, my City College history teacher, were around, he'd simply give us all a look of equal parts bewilderment and amusement, and gently chide, "But you should know this." Some 27 years ago, we celebrated the Bicentennial, whooping up the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 2007
The Republican presidential debate at Morgan State University ended around 10:30ish Thursday night when I rose from my seat in the Carl Murphy Auditorium and announced to no one in particular, "Boy! That certainly was more fun than skydiving!" I trust you will forgive me for that bit of hyperbole. But the debate among the six Republican candidates considered to have little or no chance at the presidential nomination did have moments both entertaining and informative, so much so I'm inclined to hand out some awards.
NEWS
By JACK FRUCHTMAN, Jr | September 8, 1991
"Hence it is that there can be but few men in the society who will have sufficient skill in the laws to qualify them for the stations of judges. And making the proper deductions for the ordinary depravity of human nature, the number must be still smaller of those who unite the requisite integrity with the requisite knowledge."-- Alexander Hamilton on the selection of Supreme Court justices, 1788"Even if he is mediocre, there are a lot of mediocre judges and people and lawyers. They are entitled to a little representation, aren't they?
NEWS
By Carl P. Leubsdorf and Carl P. Leubsdorf,Washington bureau chief of the Dallas Morning News | July 8, 1991
MY MOST vivid childhood memory of the Supreme Court was the 'Impeach Earl Warren' signs which lined Highway 17 near Savannah," Judge Clarence Thomas recalled last week."I didn't quite understand who this Earl Warren fellow was, but I knew he was in some kind of trouble," Thomas added.Chief Justice Warren, of course, was "in some kind of trouble" among white Southerners for the 1954 school desegregation decision, one in a series of landmark rulings over his 16-year tenure that changed the conditions under which black Georgians like Clarence Thomas lived.
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