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Earl Monroe

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NEWS
May 23, 2004
On Wednesday, May 19, 2004, EARL MONROE FRANCE, 92, in Fort Myers, FL under the care of HOpe Hospice. He was born February 23, 1912 in Oella, MD. He was the son of the late Joseph and Laura Ethel (nee Peddicord) France. Earl attended Catonsville High School. He was a commercial photographer of wedding and social occasions. He was an employee of the B & O Railroad and they used many of his photos in the B & O Magazine and the dining car menus. Some of his award-winning photographs were displayed on museum tours including the Smithsonian.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Chuck Foreman, meet Earl "The Pearl" Monroe. That's the how-de-do that Foreman, a former NFL star running back, wants to hear. "It would be a joy to run into Earl some day," he said. Foreman, who's from Frederick, played seven years with the Minnesota Vikings and led them to three Super Bowl appearances in the 1970s with mercurial moves that he borrowed from Monroe, a basketball Hall of Famer. "I grew up watching him play for the [Baltimore] Bullets," said Foreman, 63. "The Pearl could spin down the court, and the energy he brought to the game was unbelievable.
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NEWS
April 1, 2007
Last issue's Flashback: Congratulations to UniSun readers who recognized former Baltimore Bullets player Earl Monroe (left) as the man signing autographs for young fans at the 30th-year reunion of the Washington (formerly Baltimore) Bullets at Martin's West in 1995. This issue's Flashback: Who is this prominent civil-rights leader? Write to unisun@baltsun.com or UniSun Flashback, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.
SPORTS
By Ryan Hood, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Fred Carter didn't know Earl Monroe entered the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a Baltimore Bullet. "Earl went into the Hall of Fame as a Bullet?" Carter said Wednesday in a phone interview. "That's surprising. " Carter - teammates and roommates with Monroe for four seasons in Baltimore - had assumed Monroe was enshrined in 1990 as a New York Knick. It's an easy mistake to make: Monroe comprised half of the famous "Rolls Royce Backcourt" with Walt "Clyde" Frazier in New York.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
LANDOVER -- As his name was announced and the sellout crowd roared, Earl Monroe, for a brief moment, felt like he was back in the old days when the Baltimore Bullets were firmly established as one of the top teams in the league."
NEWS
June 15, 1993
IT'S pitiful enough when a sports team performs consistently poorly over a period of many years. It's even worse when the team we have in mind, the Washington Bullets of the National Basketball Association, is still remembered in these parts as an exciting and powerful club during its long-ago Baltimore incarnation.The Bullets' plight has gotten so bad that one of their latest advertising campaigns focuses not on the home squad but on other good teams that will face Washington at the Capital Centre next season.
SPORTS
By Ryan Hood, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Fred Carter didn't know Earl Monroe entered the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a Baltimore Bullet. "Earl went into the Hall of Fame as a Bullet?" Carter said Wednesday in a phone interview. "That's surprising. " Carter - teammates and roommates with Monroe for four seasons in Baltimore - had assumed Monroe was enshrined in 1990 as a New York Knick. It's an easy mistake to make: Monroe comprised half of the famous "Rolls Royce Backcourt" with Walt "Clyde" Frazier in New York.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
Eight area players looking to catch the eyes of pro scouts will be playing in Saturday's Black College All-Star Classic at 1 p.m. at the Baltimore Arena.Antoine Brockington and Danny Singletary of Coppin State are featured in the men's game, which follows the women's game at around 3 p.m. Joining the Coppin pair will be Tremain Byrd, Lorenzo Hutchinson and Jerard Rucker of Morgan State.In the women's game, Tressan Dugan of Morgan State, Vanessa Valez of UMES and Brenonda Jackson of Bowie State will play.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
March 1, 2002: The Ravens release Elvis Grbac, the expensive but mistake-prone quarterback they wooed last year instead of re-signing Trent Dilfer, who'd helped them win the Super Bowl . Grbac committed 26 turnovers in a 10-6 season as the Ravens lost in the division playoffs. Feb. 26, 1996: Team officials begin efforts to name Baltimore's new NFL franchise. "We're using some old suggestions," says David Modell, son of team owner Art Modell . "I'm sure people can extrapolate that names like Ravens, Bombers, Bulldogs and Marauders are on the list.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
He wasn't much to look at - a slender, 6-foot-3 guard with knobby knees, creaky hips and elbows that looked as if they had been run through a pencil sharpener. But, oh, could Earl Monroe play basketball. For four years, Monroe wowed the crowds in Baltimore with circus shots, between-the-legs dribbles and no-look passes. "God couldn't go one-on-one with Earl Monroe," former Bullet Ray Scott once said of his Hall of Fame teammate. From the time Monroe hit town as a rookie in 1967, the Civic Center was his juke joint.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
March 21, 2006: Their 30th basketball victory, a team record, sends the Maryland women to the Sweet 16 in the NCAA tournament. Sophomore center Crystal Langhorne scores 30 points as the third-ranked Terps stop St. John's, 81-74, in State College, Pa., en route to their first national championship. March 22, 1980: Rutgers upsets second-ranked Maryland, 9-8 in men's lacrosse. It's the Terps ' first regular-season loss since 1975 to any school other than Johns Hopkins.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
He was a gritty 6-foot-3 guard from the Bronx with boundless energy and a long, sweet jumper that seemed to kiss the Civic Center's ceiling before finding its mark. "Bullseye!" Baltimore Bullets broadcaster Jim Karvellas would exclaim as Kevin Loughery scored again. For eight years, Loughery starred for the Bullets, averaging 16.6 points and helping the club to five playoff appearances and the NBA finals in 1971. Only forward Gus Johnson (nine years) spent more time here before the Bullets, after a decade, moved to Landover in 1973 and eventually become the Washington Wizards.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
As an entertainment entrepreneur, Earl Monroe is engaged in putting together a reality television show with a woking title of "What If?" As a Hall of Famer who wears a ring he received for being one of the NBA's top-50 all-time players, Monroe asks the same question of himself. What if he had not been traded from the Baltimore Bullets to the New York Knicks early in the 1971-72 season? "I would have been revered as a different type of player, who would have accomplished all the things that I started out to accomplish," Monroe, 67, said this month, sitting at a table at Samos Restaurant in Greektown.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
He wasn't much to look at - a slender, 6-foot-3 guard with knobby knees, creaky hips and elbows that looked as if they had been run through a pencil sharpener. But, oh, could Earl Monroe play basketball. For four years, Monroe wowed the crowds in Baltimore with circus shots, between-the-legs dribbles and no-look passes. "God couldn't go one-on-one with Earl Monroe," former Bullet Ray Scott once said of his Hall of Fame teammate. From the time Monroe hit town as a rookie in 1967, the Civic Center was his juke joint.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
Last issue's Flashback: Congratulations to UniSun readers who recognized former Baltimore Bullets player Earl Monroe (left) as the man signing autographs for young fans at the 30th-year reunion of the Washington (formerly Baltimore) Bullets at Martin's West in 1995. This issue's Flashback: Who is this prominent civil-rights leader? Write to unisun@baltsun.com or UniSun Flashback, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
Earl Rodney Monroe Jr. was 14 when police first arrested him. In a little more than a year, officers nabbed the boy 10 more times, lodging felony charges that pointed to one conclusion: Lil' Earl was dealing drugs on the streets of his West Baltimore neighborhood. After each arrest, he entered a juvenile system that's supposed to provide swift treatment and, if necessary, detention. But every time Earl was arrested, juvenile justice workers and judges released him, only to see him return.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
After the first month of the season, the NBA's balance of power appears to be tilting toward the Pacific. Only five of 14 teams in the Eastern Conference -- the defending champion Chicago Bulls, the Orlando Magic with rookie sensation Shaquille O'Neal, the surprising Milwaukee Bucks, the New York Knicks and Charlotte Hornets -- have winning records.The Knicks, a preseason pick to challenge the Bulls for the title, are struggling at 5-4 after being swept on their first Western trip.The Detroit Pistons, with Dennis Rodman on suspension, are in the Central Division cellar, and the Boston Celtics are having a hard time adjusting to life without Larry Bird.
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