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Earhart

FEATURES
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2000
NEW YORK -- Back in 1996, the issue wasn't all that complicated. If Madame Tussaud's of London brought its legendary wax museum to the Big Apple, exactly what would New Yorkers want to see? But Manhattan focus groups provided answers that were underwhelming at best, said Andrew Tansley, the English director of the Tussaud's Group Ltd. Tansley would observe through a one-way mirror as city residents mumbled politely about seeing a mix of urban icons, historic figures, rock stars, politicians and sports legends.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
A Maryland undersea exploration company and the NOVA television program hope to solve one of the great mysteries of the century by finding the plane in which Amelia Earhart vanished over the Pacific Ocean 63 years ago."We think we have a pretty high probability of success," said David Jourdan, founder and president of Nauticos Corp., which has a track record of locating difficult-to-find wrecks, such as the Dakar, the Israeli submarine that was lost 20 years ago in the Mediterranean. Earhart, a celebrated aviator and icon of the 1930s, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared July 2, 1937, while on an around-the-world flight.
NEWS
June 4, 1999
Nathan S. Ancell, 90, co-founder of the Ethan Allen furniture company and pioneer of the concept of selling furniture in room-style settings, died Monday at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. Mr. Ancell and his brother-in-law, Theodore Baumritter, started their company in the 1930s in Beecher Falls, Vt., out of a bankrupt furniture factory. Its headquarters eventually moved to Danbury, Conn.Vaclav Benda, 52, a Czech senator, mathematician, philosopher and former anti-communist dissident, died yesterday in Prague, Czech Republic, the news agency CTK reported.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 1998
American researchers have discovered evidence, long buried in British military archives, suggesting that famed U.S. aviator Amelia Earhart died on Nikumaroro Island in the Polynesian Republic of Kiribati.British soldiers found bones on the island, then called Gardner Island, in 1940, and suspecting they might be those of Earhart, sent them to British headquarters in Tarawa.A physician there concluded that they were the bones of a male. A report was forwarded to England, but Americans were never notified of the discovery.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Will we ever know for sure what happened to Amelia Earhart, whose disappearance 60 years ago remains one of aviation's greatest mysteries? Check out ABC tonight."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 9, 1997
Eleanor, Bess, Mamie, Jackie. Always the first lady. Never the chief. Stuck being the power behind the throne (at least until Hillary).Presidential wives are the subject of composer/author Michael John LaChiusa's 1993 small-scale musical, "First Lady Suite," receiving a vocally impressive debut at AXIS Theatre. While this quartet of musical playlets isn't a uniformly successful work, it offers a promising glimpse of the range -- musically and dramatically -- of one of New York's up-and-coming young composers.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 9, 1996
BOSTON -- It's summer. You promised to become computer literate, but suddenly you remember that even Bill Gates chose to write a book.You've struggled with virtual reality, but now you figure you'd rather relax with a novel. You've surfed the Internet, but you find yourself longing to read in a hammock.Meanwhile, the best-seller list sounds more like the McLaughlin Group than the literary round table.The authors yell: "Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot!" or "We're Right, They're Wrong!" And you can't believe that there are still twocount 'em, twoO.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1995
As a New York actress and a devout reader of books about great women in history, Jeanne Latter is always on the lookout for interesting female roles. And when she read the Laura Shamas play "Amelia Lives!," her interest was piqued.For good reason. The award-winning entry at the world-famous Edinburgh Festival recounts the life of Amelia Earhart, the American aviator whose disappearance over the South Pacific in 1937 still has the experts debating where she went down and why."I was immediately attracted to her courage and determination," said Ms. Latter, who will perform extensive excerpts from "Amelia Lives!"
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
Rock opera, Amelia Earhart and human sculpture will meet on New Year's Eve during the annual First Night Annapolis event.More than 300 performers are expected to take over the churches, courtrooms, storefronts and streets of the state capital for the daylong celebration of the arts that is to end with a midnight fireworks display.Admission pins go on sale tomorrow at First National Bank of Maryland branches and participating Giant Food stores. They will cost $10 through Dec. 23, $14 afterward.
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