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NEWS
March 18, 1992
More than half a century after she vanished during the last leg of an attempted around-the-world flight, Amelia Earhart is back in the news. At a press conference in Washington this week, a Delaware-based aviation group unveiled tantalizing evidence suggesting Earhart crash-landed on tiny Nikumaroro Island in the Western Pacific, where she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, ultimately perished from exposure and thirst.Richard Gillespie, of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, said his team turned up a two-foot-long strip from the belly of Earhart's Lockheed Electra during a search of the island last October.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
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NEWS
October 21, 2003
On October 19, 2003, DAISY (nee Stone) SNYDER EARHART, beloved wife of the late Clarence K. Snyder and the late Luther Earhart; devoted mother of Ellsworth Snyder and the late David Snyder; loving sister of Evelyn and Doris; dearest grandmother of Candace Boeck and Bradley Snyder and loving great-grandmother of Claire and Carla Boeck. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, October 26, 2003, at 12:30 PM, from Wesley Freedom United Methodist Church, Johnsville and Liberty Rd., Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
A melia Earhart's name is back in the news these days with the recent release of the Hollywood biopic "Amelia," starring Hilary Swank as the ill-fated flier, and Richard Gere as George Putnam, her husband, publisher and public relations executive. Critics have not exactly given soaring reviews to this film treatment of the pioneering aviator's life and accomplishments. "The filmmakers spend so much time turning her into a dopey romantic figure that they never give her the animating, vital will or even much of a personality that might explain how a Kansas tomboy turned Boston social worker took to the skies and then, through her deeds and words, encouraged other women to chart their own courses," Manohla Dargis wrote last month in The New York Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2001
Computers have narrowed the search for the remains of Amelia Earhart. Last spring, Nauticos, the a marine exploration company based in the Anne Arundel County community of Hanover, announced it would attempt to solve one of the great mysteries of the 20th century - the 1937 disappearance of the aviator in the South Pacific as she was attempting to circle the globe with her navigator, Fred Noonan. Nauticos is not the only one looking for Earhart, but the company is convinced it has computed all the variables of the crash and narrowed the search area to fewer than 500 square miles off uninhabited Howland Island, about halfway between Hawaii and Australia.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Contributing Writer | January 22, 1993
Ben Earhart hoped to find some playing time during Westminster's football season. The 5-foot-7, 138-pound cornerback not only found time, but wound up starting and becoming a second-team all-Central Maryland Conference pick.His success on the football field helped prepare him for the wrestling mat. With some newfound confidence and clear focus, Earhart, a junior, has won 10 of his first 12 matches for Westminster.Earhart said after doing so well in football, he felt more confident going into the wrestling season.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The most tantalizing and enduring mystery in aviation history, the fate of the pioneering pilot Amelia Earhart, has yielded one of its central secrets, according to investigators who say they found fragments of her plane on a deserted Pacific island.Amid the coconut palms of Nikumaroro, an island about halfway between New Guinea and Hawaii, a search party from the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery found a sheet of metal that they say is from the plane's fuselage.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 20, 1992
Boston -- The detectives have come back with their evidence. One rubber heel for a woman's size 9 shoe. A threaded top from a bottle that once held stomach medicine. A piece of aluminum skin from the fuselage of a pre-World War II plane.These are now offered up as proof that Amelia Earhart died on an inhospitable atoll in the South Pacific. The 39-year-old pilot and her navigator attempting to add yet another first to her list -- The First Pilot to Circle the Globe near the Equator -- missed Howland Island.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | October 28, 1994
"Amelia," children's story about a little girl, her father and the spirit of Amelia Earhart, is certain to take Baltimore by storm. It was written by Baltimorean Fred Wehr and illustrated by Becky Irish, who recently graduated from the Maryland Institute, College of Art.Mr. Wehr and his wife, Sylvia Eggleston Wehr, are having a book signing party at the L'Hirondelle Club in Ruxton Thursdayfor family and friends. Mr. Wehr, a former stunt pilot, will share the spotlight with a number of local people who share his love of flying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Southern belle. Fairy-tale princess. Nun. Pioneer aviatrix. Is there any role Amy Adams can't play? Maybe. It's hard imagining her as a victim in the next Friday 13th sequel, or as a lethal cyborg in the Terminator franchise. But just about everything else seems possible, especially after her star turn as a saucy Amelia Earhart in the summer-blockbuster in waiting, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian. "I don't know that there's a better actress in her generation," says Smithsonian director Shawn Levy, who was in Washington on Thursday evening for the movie's world premiere at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Southern belle. Fairy-tale princess. Nun. Pioneer aviatrix. Is there any role Amy Adams can't play? Maybe. It's hard imagining her as a victim in the next Friday 13th sequel, or as a lethal cyborg in the Terminator franchise. But just about everything else seems possible, especially after her star turn as a saucy Amelia Earhart in the summer-blockbuster in waiting, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian. "I don't know that there's a better actress in her generation," says Smithsonian director Shawn Levy, who was in Washington on Thursday evening for the movie's world premiere at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Bowen Pattison Weisheit Sr., a retired Harford County real estate lawyer and author who wrote of his World War II experiences as well as the disappearance of flier Amelia Earhart, died of heart failure April 29 while shad fishing on the Susquehanna River. The longtime Bel Air resident, who was pronounced dead at Harford Memorial Hospital, was 90. Mr. Weisheit, the son of a lawyer and West Towson developer, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1936 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from St. John's College in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
Nearly 3 million people visited Washington's Smithsonian Institution last summer, and that was without any help from Ben Stiller. Imagine what will happen come May 22, when Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian opens, and suddenly it becomes cool to visit the nation's attic. "Yes, we are aware of the enormous effect that the movies can have on museums," says Claire Brown, communications director for the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, where much of the sequel to 2006's enormously successful Night at the Museum is set. "It encourages kids to use their imagination, to see museums as a source not only for education, but also for the kind of magic that can only be obtained from actually seeing an artifact, that sense of connection."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 4, 2008
Performing artists are reaching out to mural artists in an exchange of talents to help a Severna Park nonprofit enhance a section of the B&A Trail. ASPIRE, or the Association for Severna Park Improvement Renewal and Enhancement, is raising money for its Centennial Murals project, commissioned artworks depicting the community's history that will be painted along the commercial section of the trail. The only completed murals are behind the Carr Building at Riggs Avenue and B&A Boulevard, where artist Cindy Fletcher-Holden has created a stunning rendition of the railroad that once ran through Severna Park, and around the corner is her tranquil beach scene.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | May 7, 2008
Dignity Players' current production of Vanishing Point introduces us to three of the 20th century's most fascinating female adventurers and achievers: Amelia Earhart, Aimee Semple McPherson and Agatha Christie. With book and lyrics by Liv Cummins and composer Rob Hartmann, and from a concept by Scott Keys, Dignity's East Coast premiere production of this unusual musical continues this season's theme celebrating the strength and accomplishments of women. Vanishing Point opened last weekend at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis, where it will continue through Sunday.
FEATURES
February 4, 2006
2:30 p.m. Major League --See The Soul of the Game, a film that details the competition between Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson and Jackie Robinson to become the first African-American player in baseball's major leagues, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Free. 410-396-5430. 7:30 p.m. Up and Away --Here's the last chance to see resident artist Mara Neimanis' one-woman aerial performance commemorating Amelia Earhart at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Neimanis, as Earhart, will be perched atop a 12-foot-tall, rotating plane sculpture, made of steel by fellow resident artist Laura Shults.
NEWS
July 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Amelia Earhart is still missing, but they might have found her luggage.On the 54th anniversary of Earhart's disappearance, a team of explorers announced yesterday that this fall they will conduct a sea and land search of a remote Pacific atoll where they believe the pioneering pilot landed her plane and then died of thirst.The searchers are following up on a 1989 discovery of a small aluminum box on the island they believe could be the map case from her plane.A photo specialist said yesterday the box "is approximately the right size" as the map case seen inside Earhart's plane in a fuzzy photograph taken four days before Earhart vanished.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 1998
American researchers have discovered evidence, long buried in British military archives, suggesting that famed U.S. aviator Amelia Earhart died on Nikumaroro Island in the Polynesian Republic of Kiribati.British soldiers found bones on the island, then called Gardner Island, in 1940, and suspecting they might be those of Earhart, sent them to British headquarters in Tarawa.A physician there concluded that they were the bones of a male. A report was forwarded to England, but Americans were never notified of the discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2006
THEATER 'MURDER' AT CENTER STAGE The Murder of Isaac, Israeli Motti Lerner's play about the 1995 assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, makes its American and English language debuts at Center Stage's Head Theater beginning tomorrow. The play, which has never been produced in Israel, places the action in a hospital where patients with post-traumatic-stress disorder stage a re-enactment of the murder as part of their therapy. Irene Lewis directs a cast headed by Broadway actors David Margulies in the role of the patient who portrays the prime minister; Mia Dillon, as the prime minister's wife; and Olek Krupa, as the leader of the opposition.
FEATURES
January 11, 2006
Jan. 11 1935: Amelia Earhart began a trip from Honolulu to Oakland that made her the first woman to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean. 1964: U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry issued the first government report saying smoking may be hazardous to one's health.
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