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NEWS
June 6, 1995
Educating Baltimore's children is so important that the topic should not become an election-year football. As a series of articles in The Sun makes all too clear, there have been only mixed results at best in nine troubled public schools managed by a private company, Education Alternatives Inc., for the past three years.With a mayoral primary in September only three months away, it must be tempting for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to consider drastic changes in the costly contract. It would win him points with the Baltimore Teachers Union, for instance, which has been out to sabotage EAI from the start.
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NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
EAI Corp., a national defense contractor based in Abingdon, is expanding its headquarters in William Paca Industrial Park from 25,187 to 45,530 square feet, the company announced last week. Barney Michel, EAI's vice president of management and integration, said that he expects to complete the project in the spring. The company will occupy the entire building at 1308 Continental Drive, which it previously shared with Convergence Corp., a mouse pad and counter mat manufacturer. EAI specializes in manufacturing materials used by the departments of Defense and Homeland Security - gloves, suits and breathing apparatus - for protection against biological and chemical attacks.
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NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1995
Just days after Baltimore's mayor called for changes in Education Alternatives Inc.'s contract to manage nine city schools, the for-profit company has replaced the executive overseeing its work here.William F. Goins, EAI's second-in-command, will assume his new duties "effective immediately," spokeswoman Chris Bauer said yesterday from the company's Minneapolis headquarters. Mr. Goins, a former Xerox executive and a graduate of Morgan State University, joined EAI as chief operating officer in January.
NEWS
February 2, 2003
Death warrant signed for killer of Harford woman A Baltimore County judge paved the way last week for Maryland's first execution in nearly five years when he agreed to sign a death warrant for convicted murderer Steven H. Oken. It is the first capital case to move forward under Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., whose entry into office effectively ended the state's moratorium on the death penalty. Oken was convicted in the 1987 murder of Dawn Marie Garvin, a Joppatowne High school graduate.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Education Alternatives Inc., responding to a lawsuit filed by two investors, defended its accounting practices yesterday, saying it complies with industry standards.The suit, filed Feb. 23 in federal district court in Minneapolis, charges that the company, which runs nine Baltimore schools, used irregular accounting methods and made unfulfilled promises to boost the company's stock price last fall.But John T. Golle, EAI's chairman and chief executive, said the company has fully disclosed its accounting practices in Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Education Alternatives Inc. took the first step yesterday toward injecting high-technology into nine Baltimore schools, announcing that it had formed an alliance with Computer Curriculum Corp. to supply the schools with more than 1,000 computers equipped with advanced educational software.The deal, which could cost EAI more than $1 million a year, would put Tandy computers in the classrooms, as well as additional machines in media centers and administrative offices.The 4,800 pupils in the nine schools that EAI has contracted to run would be able to call up multimedia exercises and study programs, print out reference material and learn at their own speed.
NEWS
October 20, 1994
Politicians can be really disgusting at times. Look at the feeding frenzy as City Council members are scrambling before television cameras to pronounce their verdict on test scores that are not rising at eight elementary schools that for the past two years have been run by for-profit Education Alternatives Inc.Ever since the Baltimore Teachers Union and the American Federation of Teachers declared a holy war on EAI, attacking privatization has been a...
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 15, 1994
MINNEAPOLIS -- Education Alternatives Inc. agreed to provide management and educational services to the Pinckney, Mich., school district, President David Bennett said yesterday.EAI is proposing that the job run five years, the executive said.Under terms, it would provide accounting, custodial and maintenance services to the school district, which has an annual budget of $18 million and 3,800 students in five schools.EAI operates nine Baltimore City schools under its Tesseract program, and EAI has reached five-year agreements to take over financial management, cafeterias, security and maintenance at two additional Baltimore schools.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1995
A Baltimore councilman contends that Education Alternatives Inc. and the school system have stymied scrutiny of the city's school privatization venture by failing to provide necessary financial documents to his new oversight committee.More than two months ago, amid widening criticism of the controversial privatization experiment, the council moved to monitor EAI's spending and progress in a dozen schools.But Councilman Carl Stokes, a 2nd District Democrat, complained this week that the school system and company have yet to provide an accounting of about $38 million in contracts for the 1993-1994 school year.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- In an about-face that will cut its annual revenues by nearly $9 million, Education Alternatives Inc. said yesterday it would use a new accounting method for two baltimore schools it is under contract to manage.The company, which runs nine city schools and won a contract to manage the two additional schools in December, originally said the two schools would add $9.6 million to its annual revenues. But after huddling with its accountants and coming under criticism from accounting experts who said the figures were inflated, the company said it would adopt a more conservative accounting method.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2002
WHAT A CAN of worms they've opened in Philadelphia! A reform commission narrowly voted last week to privatize 42 of the school district's 264 schools. Those schools will be turned over to seven for-profit companies, universities and nonprofit groups. One of the for-profits is Edison Schools Inc., which runs three schools in Baltimore. At week's end, there was much confusion in Philadelphia, and hundreds of the city's 13,000 teachers were seeking paperwork to transfer or quit. It makes Baltimore look like a model of calm efficiency.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
For 15 years, Baltimore Del. Clarence Davis has listened to the promises of one school official after another. He has attended meetings where teachers showed off new curriculum after new curriculum. He has seen principals come and principals go. All the while, like the leafy, once-dignified neighborhood surrounding it, his local elementary school has slid further into decline. So, when Maryland's superintendent of schools, Nancy S. Grasmick, arrived yesterday to tell state legislators about her hopes for three city elementary schools, Davis had a blunt question: What makes her think the state can do any better?
NEWS
September 29, 1999
THE WRECKAGE from Educational Alternative Inc.'s early '90s privatization experiment is still smoking in certain corners of the Baltimore school system. And now comes the Maryland State Department of Education, proposing another dalliance with outside management of troubled public schools.Is this a case of failure to learn from past mistakes?Not likely. The state has a plan for privatization -- which places it light years ahead of the EAI deal. And in the context of the current reconstitution program -- which has failed to take definitive action against schools that don't improve -- how could this plan not be an improvement?
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Two years after the city terminated its contract with Education Alternatives Inc. to manage 12 Baltimore schools, city leaders said yesterday that the Minneapolis-based company owes more than $500,000 as part of a settlement.But Philip Geiger, president of TesseracT Group, formerly known as EAI, said that the management firm has been trying to give the city the $511,102 for two years but that school officials never followed through on their effort to collect the money."We have been trying to give it to them for two years," Geiger said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
A GREAT PARADOX in Baltimore is that while the powers-that-be struggle to pull public education out of the quagmire -- removing the superintendent, replacing the school board, insisting on better management -- the schools' national reputation is quite rosy.Articles in year-end editions of respected magazines illustrate the point."Renaissance in Baltimore" is the title of a piece by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in the journal Technos, published by the Agency for Instructional Technology."Despite limited resources, we've made substantial progress through a wide range of strategies, partnerships and some exciting -- and at times controversial -- risk-taking ," the mayor brags.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1996
Beverly Harmon's desk was clean, her in-box empty and the last trappings of a 3 1/2 -year educational experiment packed into fewer than a dozen cardboard boxes destined for Minnesota.With reluctance and a few tears, Mrs. Harmon locked the doors of the Tesseract Offices at Harlem Park Middle School, hugged her colleagues and ended another chapter in Baltimore education reform."I'm the last one. Turn out the lights and that's it," she said.For 18 months, Mrs. Harmon, a retired Montgomery County principal, has been the receptionist for Educational Alternatives Inc., the Minneapolis-based educational management firm that has been operating nine city schools since September 1992.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
The Baltimore City Council voted yesterday to subpoena financial records of Educational Alternatives Inc., forcing the company to provide detailed information of its financial dealings with the city.By the end of the week, 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes said, the city will issue the appropriate papers to EAI requiring officials to immediately make public company travel and maintenance expenses and attorney fees. Mr. Stokes also said the city will subpoena information on per-pupil costs, lobbying and an explanation of 1993 financial statements.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and JoAnna Daemmrich and Gary Gately and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | October 20, 1994
Amid a torrent of criticism and doubts about Baltimore's school-privatization venture, Superintendent Walter G. Amprey defended yesterday the work of Education Alternatives Inc. and minimized the importance of standardized test scores alone as a barometer of pupil progress.A day after some City Council members and other detractors called for a halt to the experiment, Dr. Amprey delivered his strongest attack yet against critics.At a late-afternoon news conference, he repeatedly asserted that the criticism of EAI has nothing to do with whether the "Tesseract" program is good for children but instead stems from gripes by teachers unions or lawmakers seeking political gain.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1996
Baltimore's three-and-a-half-year experiment in school privatization ends today, as the city terminates its contract with Education Alternatives Inc., and the Minneapolis-based school management firm moves out of a dozen city schools.School system officials and EAI managers say the move will go so smoothly that almost no one will notice the change in management."We're working to ensure a minimum of disruption to any student," said Ramon Harris, EAI's manager in Baltimore."If we've done our job right, hopefully Monday will come and go and nobody will know the difference," said city schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey.
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