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By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2010
At the urging of construction unions, Baltimore County Council members are pushing for a new requirement that contractors working for the county verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The council is scheduled to take up a resolution today urging County Executive Jim Smith to encourage contractors to vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. "If a business knowingly hires illegal aliens on a county contract, they should lose that contract and the ability to bid on future contracts with the county," said Council Chairman John Olszewski, who introduced the measure with Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver.
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NEWS
By Tamar Jacoby | July 1, 2012
The Supreme Court's immigration decision is a step back from the brink, leaving much less room than many expected for state immigration enforcement. Although the justices blocked most provisions of Arizona's controversial 2010 policing law, they upheld the one of most concern to immigrant rights advocates: the section that requires local police to inquire about the immigration status of people they stop for other reasons and whom they suspect are in the country illegally. Even this part of the opinion is more tenuous than many expected, leaving open the possibility of future reconsideration by the court.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
At the urging of construction unions, Baltimore County Council members are pushing for a new requirement that contractors working for the county verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The council is scheduled to take up a resolution today urging County Executive Jim Smith to encourage contractors to vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. "If a business knowingly hires illegal aliens on a county contract, they should lose that contract and the ability to bid on future contracts with the county," said Council Chairman John Olszewski, who introduced the measure with Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
At a tidy jail in Frederick County, Sheriff Chuck Jenkins and his deputies have helped federal authorities identify nearly 1,000 illegal immigrants for deportation in the past three years. In a renovated mansion in Prince George's County, Casa de Maryland employees have welcomed tens of thousands of immigrants over the years, regardless of legal status, teaching them English, helping with citizenship paperwork and defending them against policies like the one in Frederick County. Maryland has a split personality about illegal immigrants — a divide illustrated this year by the legislature's passage of a bill to provide college tuition breaks to undocumented state high school graduates only to have it put on hold by a citizen petition.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
Imposing harsh "enforcement-only" measures like the flawed "E-Verify" system on immigrant workers without fixing our broken immigration system will only make matters worse by pushing undocumented workers deeper into the shadows -- something that benefits only the most unscrupulous off-the-books employers. ("E-Verify urged for Baltimore County," Feb. 2.) The E-Verify verification system that Baltimore County Council Chairman John A. Olszewski Sr. wants to impose on Baltimore's workers and businesses is not the solution to our broken immigration system.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
Contractors working with Baltimore County could soon be required to verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The County Council enacted a resolution Monday, by a unanimous vote of the six members that were present. The resolution urges County Executive James T. Smith Jr. to ensure contractors vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. The free, online system, operated by the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration, allows an employer to compare details from a new hire's employment eligibility form with information from more than 500 million federal records.
NEWS
February 3, 2010
County Council's wrong on immigrant worker verification Imposing harsh "enforcement-only" measures like the flawed "E-Verify" system on immigrant workers without fixing our broken immigration system will only make matters worse by pushing undocumented workers deeper into the shadows - something that benefits only the most unscrupulous off-the-books employers. ("E-Verify urged for Baltimore County," Feb. 2.) The E-Verify verification system that Baltimore County Council Chairman John A. Olszewski Sr. wants to impose on Baltimore's workers and businesses is not the solution to our broken immigration system.
NEWS
By Tamar Jacoby | July 1, 2012
The Supreme Court's immigration decision is a step back from the brink, leaving much less room than many expected for state immigration enforcement. Although the justices blocked most provisions of Arizona's controversial 2010 policing law, they upheld the one of most concern to immigrant rights advocates: the section that requires local police to inquire about the immigration status of people they stop for other reasons and whom they suspect are in the country illegally. Even this part of the opinion is more tenuous than many expected, leaving open the possibility of future reconsideration by the court.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
At a tidy jail in Frederick County, Sheriff Chuck Jenkins and his deputies have helped federal authorities identify nearly 1,000 illegal immigrants for deportation in the past three years. In a renovated mansion in Prince George's County, Casa de Maryland employees have welcomed tens of thousands of immigrants over the years, regardless of legal status, teaching them English, helping with citizenship paperwork and defending them against policies like the one in Frederick County. Maryland has a split personality about illegal immigrants — a divide illustrated this year by the legislature's passage of a bill to provide college tuition breaks to undocumented state high school graduates only to have it put on hold by a citizen petition.
NEWS
By DIANA NGUYEN | Capital News Service | January 23, 2010
WASHINGTON - The Maryland Hispanic population has increased by at least 65 percent since the 2000 Census, contributing to increasing ethnic diversity nationally, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. There are 375,830 Hispanics living in Maryland as of 2007, an increase from 227,916 in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the Maryland Department of Planning and released Wednesday. After Hispanics, Asian immigration ranks second with a 29 percent increase. The Census Bureau American Community Survey reported that the massive increase in immigration from Latin American and Asian countries over the last 40 years "has been the major force changing the racial and ethnic composition of the American population."
NEWS
February 3, 2010
County Council's wrong on immigrant worker verification Imposing harsh "enforcement-only" measures like the flawed "E-Verify" system on immigrant workers without fixing our broken immigration system will only make matters worse by pushing undocumented workers deeper into the shadows - something that benefits only the most unscrupulous off-the-books employers. ("E-Verify urged for Baltimore County," Feb. 2.) The E-Verify verification system that Baltimore County Council Chairman John A. Olszewski Sr. wants to impose on Baltimore's workers and businesses is not the solution to our broken immigration system.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
Imposing harsh "enforcement-only" measures like the flawed "E-Verify" system on immigrant workers without fixing our broken immigration system will only make matters worse by pushing undocumented workers deeper into the shadows -- something that benefits only the most unscrupulous off-the-books employers. ("E-Verify urged for Baltimore County," Feb. 2.) The E-Verify verification system that Baltimore County Council Chairman John A. Olszewski Sr. wants to impose on Baltimore's workers and businesses is not the solution to our broken immigration system.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
Contractors working with Baltimore County could soon be required to verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The County Council enacted a resolution Monday, by a unanimous vote of the six members that were present. The resolution urges County Executive James T. Smith Jr. to ensure contractors vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. The free, online system, operated by the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration, allows an employer to compare details from a new hire's employment eligibility form with information from more than 500 million federal records.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2010
At the urging of construction unions, Baltimore County Council members are pushing for a new requirement that contractors working for the county verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The council is scheduled to take up a resolution today urging County Executive Jim Smith to encourage contractors to vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. "If a business knowingly hires illegal aliens on a county contract, they should lose that contract and the ability to bid on future contracts with the county," said Council Chairman John Olszewski, who introduced the measure with Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
At the urging of construction unions, Baltimore County Council members are pushing for a new requirement that contractors working for the county verify the immigration status of their employees or risk losing county business. The council is scheduled to take up a resolution today urging County Executive Jim Smith to encourage contractors to vet new hires with the federal E-Verify program. "If a business knowingly hires illegal aliens on a county contract, they should lose that contract and the ability to bid on future contracts with the county," said Council Chairman John Olszewski, who introduced the measure with Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver.
EXPLORE
August 18, 2012
Almost two years have passed since the people of Carroll County's District 2 elected me to the office of County Commissioner. As an elected official, I believe it is my responsibility to keep the people I represent informed about what I've done - and what I plan to do to make their lives better. Therefore, I'd like to give an update on the decisions I've made through the first two years of my term as commissioner. Since taking office, I've voted for a multitude of policies and plans, but there are six key decisions that exemplify the conservative principles I campaigned on. First, I led the charge to place a limit of two terms on all County Commissioners from this point forward, ensuring that this office will never again be used to pass legislation that abuses public funds for the sole purpose of padding a re-election effort.
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