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By Gareth Branwyn | April 19, 1999
Phone takes messages, tells you when e-mail messages await youCasio PhoneMate's new IT-380 E-Mail Link ($149) is an unusual telephone that combines normal desk phone functions with a digital answering machine and an "e-mail advisory" feature. At intervals you schedule, the IT-380 will dial your Internet service provider and alert you to new messages waiting for you online.A three-line, 18-character LCD screen displays the headers of up to 40 e-mail messages, showing subject lines, senders' e-mail addresses, and time-date stamps.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Anne Arundel County's government e-mail system is back up an running today, according to Tracie Reynolds, a county spokeswoman. The system was shut down on Friday night so that information technology workers could fix problems with the system. Last week, government workers and elected officials encountered issues with the system, including delays in sending and receiving messages or messages not going through. The shutdown came at a busy time for the County Council, whose members are getting a lot of e-mail messages about issues such as the county budget, which is scheduled to be finalized on Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 1998
Most of Jimmy and Bonnie Nolen's two-year search for the perfect home was decidedly low-tech.But after reading stacks of Cecil County home-shopping pamphlets and driving to look at dozens of houses, their homebuying unexpectedly took a high-tech turn onto the "information superhighway" last fall.A few weeks after Jimmy Nolen, a ship's captain with the U.S. Merchant Marine, left home on a four-month assignment at sea, Bonnie Nolen found the house they'd been seeking.It is a 6,000-square-foot contemporary home with high ceilings and angles and curves that look like "a little gray castle," said Mrs. Nolen, 51.The house has three fireplaces, five bedrooms, an in-law suite and a floor plan that is open and spacious.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | October 19, 2008
You've seen plenty of e-mail trying to trick you into sharing sensitive data. Now the Federal Trade Commission is urging consumers to be even more cautious of online scammers looking to take advantage of upheavals in the financial marketplace. The FTC is warning consumers to be wary of e-mail messages that look as if they come from a financial institution that recently acquired a consumer's bank, savings and loan, or mortgage. These messages, the FTC says, may be from "phishers" looking for your account numbers, passwords and Social Security numbers.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Snide jokes about the boss. Cartoons containing ethnic slurs. Sexually explicit messages. Across the state, Maryland's municipalities are scrambling to let workers know their every keystroke could be monitored as the computer police nose around inboxes and peek at electronic files in search of offensive e-mail messages. "It's a public trust issue," said Steven D. Powell, director of management and budget for Carroll County. "When you're using equipment that belongs to the taxpayers, you have to be mindful that everything you do is subject to public scrutiny."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Anne Arundel County's government e-mail system is back up an running today, according to Tracie Reynolds, a county spokeswoman. The system was shut down on Friday night so that information technology workers could fix problems with the system. Last week, government workers and elected officials encountered issues with the system, including delays in sending and receiving messages or messages not going through. The shutdown came at a busy time for the County Council, whose members are getting a lot of e-mail messages about issues such as the county budget, which is scheduled to be finalized on Tuesday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Recently declassified e-mail messages provide new details of the bruising battle that John R. Bolton, then an undersecretary of state, waged with analysts at the State Department and the CIA in 2002 as he sought to deliver a speech reflecting a hard-line view of Cuba and its possible efforts to acquire biological weapons. The messages, provided to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, are surfacing during a firestorm over Bolton's nomination as ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 2000
WASHINGTON -- To civil libertarians and Internet service providers, a device created by the FBI to snoop through e-mail messages is as ominous as its name: "Carnivore." Attached to an ISP's server, the contraption sifts through countless e-mail messages and copies specific information for federal agents seeking suspected criminals, including terrorists and child pornographers. But critics say that, in the process of sifting out communications from its targets, Carnivore is also capable of retrieving the private messages of innocent people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2005
In 2000, amid rising concerns that its painkiller Vioxx posed heart risks, Merck overruled one of its scientists after he suggested that a patient in a clinical trial had probably died of a heart attack. In an e-mail exchange about Vioxx, the company's most important new drug at the time, a senior Merck scientist repeatedly encouraged the researcher to change his views about the death "so that we don't raise concerns." In subsequent reports to the Food and Drug Administration and in a paper published in 2003, Merck designated the cause of death as "unknown" for the patient, a 73-year-old woman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Even as Congress was unanimously approving a law aimed at reducing the flow of junk e-mail, members were sending out hundreds of thousands of unsolicited messages to constituents. The spasm of activity is aimed at attracting voluntary subscribers to the lawmakers' e-mail lists, which would not be subject to House rules that normally impose a 90-day blackout before an election for taxpayer-supported congressional mass communications. In September, the House Administration Committee voted 5-3 along party lines to allow e-mail messages to the subscribers to be sent in the blackout period, but maintained the ban on free postal mail from House members to voters.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 3, 2008
Two spam e-mail messages floating around the Internet contain a malicious virus that forces you to wipe your hard drive clean to get rid of the infection, warns the Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland. One e-mail purports to be from UPS, telling the recipient that a shipment could not be delivered. The reader is asked to open an attachment to gain access to an invoice waybill in order to pick up the shipment, the BBB says. The attachment contains the damaging virus. The second e-mail, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, directs the recipient to click on a link to read an article about the FBI vs. Facebook.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | July 27, 2008
Bogus e-mail appearing to come from universities and colleges is making the rounds to "phish" for personal or sensitive information such as passwords, credit card account data and Social Security numbers. In a warning last week, Penn State warned its students, faculty, staff and alumni to beware of e-mail messages from addresses such as The Psu.edu Team, websupport@webmaster.com, and ALERT@psu.edu. One version of the message states that it's from the "webmail messaging center" and that the university is upgrading Penn State WebMail so recipients should "upgrade their user accounts."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 25, 2008
As e-mail messages, text messages and social network postings become nearly ubiquitous in the lives of teenagers, the informality of electronic communications is seeping into their schoolwork, a new study says. Nearly two-thirds of 700 students surveyed said their e-communication style sometimes bled into school assignments, according to the study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, in partnership with the College Board's National Commission on Writing. About half said they sometimes omitted proper punctuation and capitalization in schoolwork.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | February 24, 2008
Be wary of e-mail that says someone has filed a complaint against you or your company with the Department of Justice, Internal Revenue Service, Social Security Administration or Better Business Bureau. According to the FBI, the e-mail messages are intended to appear as legitimate communications from the various agencies and they address recipients by name. Other personal information may also be included in the e-mail. Consistent with similar schemes, the e-mail likely will attempt to obtain personally identifiable information, the FBI says.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Mary Gail Hare and Laura Barnhardt and Mary Gail Hare,sun reporters | February 16, 2007
Deb Merlock didn't have to sit in front of the television or by the radio to learn that Harford County schools were closed. She didn't have to turn on her computer or even get out of bed. All the Abingdon mother of four had to do was answer her phone. The information that schools were closing this week came through a new computerized phone service by the Harford County school system - just one of the ways that technology has been working this week in the Baltimore area to spread weather-related information.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Eric Benderoff,Chicago Tribune | November 30, 2006
This is the time of year for greeting cards, and a growing number of them, conveniently, will come via the Internet. There's only one problem: Some of the e-mail messages saying that you have an e-greeting card from a friend or family member may instead be from a scam artist intent on obtaining your Social Security number, credit-card data or even brokerage account information. "People like receiving greeting cards this time of year, and they are likely to click on these greetings" if they are in their e-mail inbox, said Stu Elefant, senior product manager for McAfee Inc., an Internet security firm that markets products that detect unsafe Web sites or e-mail.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 3, 2008
Two spam e-mail messages floating around the Internet contain a malicious virus that forces you to wipe your hard drive clean to get rid of the infection, warns the Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland. One e-mail purports to be from UPS, telling the recipient that a shipment could not be delivered. The reader is asked to open an attachment to gain access to an invoice waybill in order to pick up the shipment, the BBB says. The attachment contains the damaging virus. The second e-mail, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, directs the recipient to click on a link to read an article about the FBI vs. Facebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2001
I travel a lot and am often absent from my desktop workstation for two to four months. Inevitably, when I return, the jets in my inkjet printers are clogged with dried ink. I have tried cleaning the cartridge heads with alcohol on a cotton swab, with no success. I have had to buy new cartridges despite being able to see that the clogged ones were full. That is wasteful, annoying, ecologically unsound and expensive. Any recommendations? The tiny holes on the head of inkjet printer cartridges are designed to release ink onto the paper when exposed to heat.
BUSINESS
By James Coates | October 5, 2006
While using Outlook Express 6, it occa- sionally offers to compact folders to reduce space on my hard drive. What happens to the folders when they are "compacting"? What does this process do? Where do the removed files go? Also, I can't find my Outlook Express folders stored on my C drive searching for DBX files, so what extension is OE6 using to store e-mails? A good explanation of the "compacting" process would be welcome. - Jim Wren, columbus.rr.com Quickly stated, compacting a database gets done in most information collecting software, including Outlook Express with its databases of address books, e-mail messages and such.
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