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By Andrea K. Walker | May 3, 2011
People in England and Spain may now be able to buy suits and ties from Jos. A. Bank Clothiers. The Hampstead-based retail chain said today it will now make it possible for people in other countries to shop from its Internet site. It is expanding Internet shopping to more than 90 countries. The orders may be placed directly by international customers or by U.S. customers who wish to deliver their orders to family or friends at international addresses. The company is using a third party provider, FiftyOne Global Ecommerce, to facilitate the checkout and exporting of orders.  Shoppers will be able to use the currencies of the countries where they are buying from.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Stock in Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. surged Tuesday after a report that it was about to be acquired by technology giant Oracle Corp. The company's shares shot up nearly 15 percent to close at $66.33 each in Tuesday trading after Bloomberg News reported that Oracle and Micros were in exclusive talks about the sale of the Maryland firm for more than $5 billion. The Bloomberg report cited anonymous sources "familiar with the matter," and neither company responded to requests for comment.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour said Thursday that it hired a former executive with the Orvis Co. to head its e-commerce business. John Rogers, who most recently was vice president of multi-channel marketing at Orvis Co., will join Under Armour in mid-May. Rogers has also worked at Toysmart.com and Hasbro. "Digital represents one of the most important places for our brand to connect with our young consumer," Kevin Plank, Under Armour founder and CEO said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Liz Derubertis browsed stores at Arundel Mills mall Wednesday in search of a dress to wear to a wedding. The 26-year-old bartender and University of Maryland, Baltimore County student never shops for clothes online. "I'm too particular about the fit, and I don't want to take the time to send it back," said Derubertis of Ellicott City. "I like being out, being in the crowds and perusing and seeing what's being offered - and people-watching. " Just as video did not kill the radio star, the Internet won't kill the shopping mall any time soon.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Frederick-based Galaxy Information Services LLC will merge with the e-commerce division of Atlanta's Third Millennium Communications Inc., creating a company that can offer online trade shows and build electronic marketplaces for each of the nation's 3,500 trade associations. The merger, announced yesterday, is the newest wrinkle in the rush to create online marketplaces in the "business-to-business" portion of the electronic-commerce arena. Up to now, many of the virtual marketplaces built for various industries are being created by outsiders -- technology firms without long-standing industry ties that were created, essentially, to establish those markets.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Kristine Henry and Shanon D. Murray and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1999
As the owner of a bookstore the size of a small living room, Elizabeth Garrett said she did not have the time -- or the cash -- to launch an e-commerce site to help her St. Bede's Books store stay afloat in the treacherously competitive bookselling marketplace.As a life raft for thousands of private bookstore owners like Garrett, the American Booksellers Association has created a national marketing campaign called Book Sense that will feature an e-commerce site.The idea behind the Book Sense program -- unveiled this month at a book convention in Los Angeles -- is to build a national identity for the independent booksellers that are members of the New York-based trade group.
NEWS
December 26, 1999
THE explosion of e-commerce -- estimated to total more than $6 billion this holiday season-- has intensified a decades-old problem in the mail-order business: collecting state sales tax.Since a 1992 Supreme Court decision, states have been able to collect sales taxes on mail-order purchases only if the seller had a physical presence in the state. If a company has no stores or offices in a state, its sales there are tax free.This same principle has been extended to cybershops. In 1998, Congress passed a three-year moratorium on new sales taxes on Intemet transactions and created a commission to study the issue and make recommendations by April 2000.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
AppNet Systems Inc., a Bethesda company that is less than 2 years old but hopes to emerge a dominant player in the exploding electronic commerce industry, went public yesterday, raising $72 million.The company sold 6 million shares, or a 20 percent stake, at $12 each. The shares closed unchanged on the Nasdaq stock market, reflecting the recent cooling trend for Internet-related issues.The company, which helps companies set up and maintain computer systems that allow them to conduct business over the Internet, said in its filing for the initial public offering that it posted a $15 million loss on revenue of $17 million in 1998.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Jay Steinmetz is confident that 2002 will mean growth for his Baltimore dot-com company. "Now that the fallout has happened, the people who are still around are getting stronger," said Steinmetz, president and founder of Barcoding.com. The worst is over, experts said, and this year is expected to be more stable. The companies that will be successful selling online will be the more trusted brick-and-mortar businesses, said Steve Butler, senior e-business analyst for eMarketer Inc. in New York.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
Taking the biggest step yet in its aggressive acquisition strategy, AppNet Systems Inc. will announce today the purchase of three high-technology firms that it hopes will help it become a major player in the burgeoning Internet commerce market.AppNet is buying Laurel-based software and network-design firm Century Computing Inc.; marketing and consulting company NMP Inc. of Falls Church, Va.; and Research & Planning Inc., a Cambridge, Mass., inventory-management firm.The three acquisitions are stock and cash deals worth more than $10 million each.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Retail analysts reported a curious trend this Black Friday. On the traditional first shopping day of the Christmas season, the number of visits to malls, big box stores and other retailers increased, according to the analytics firm ShopperTrak, but the amount spent in brick-and-mortar businesses actually went down slightly from last year's total. Online shopping, meanwhile, jumped ahead of its traditional Cyber Monday kick-off and exceeded $1 billion on the Friday after Thanksgiving for the first time.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | July 10, 2011
The guy didn't want a necklace, brooch or anything else shiny. He already had the bling: a huge diamond-and-sapphire ring that he placed on the counter at Nelson Coleman Jewelers a couple months ago. He just wanted a Nelson Coleman gift box in which to wrap the ring, to disguise the fact that he'd bought it on the Web and received it by mail in a zip-lock bag, recalls store co-owner Chris Coleman. Maryland jewelers have gotten used to this kind of thing. For many shoppers, the high value and low shipping weight of jewelry make it the perfect Internet product.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2011
Paula Jagemann had thought of herself as a retired entrepreneur. Then an idea for a startup grabbed her and wouldn't let go. While on the board of Frederick Memorial Hospital, she learned that breast cancer patients have a hard time tracking down all the specialized home-health items they need. Jagemann, an e-commerce veteran, thought it was a problem crying out for an online business solution. This month, the Frederick woman launched Someone With, which aims to collect and sell the best products for patients — from deodorant that won't interfere with chemotherapy to moisture-wicking bedsheets for the hot flashes that come with treatment.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | May 3, 2011
People in England and Spain may now be able to buy suits and ties from Jos. A. Bank Clothiers. The Hampstead-based retail chain said today it will now make it possible for people in other countries to shop from its Internet site. It is expanding Internet shopping to more than 90 countries. The orders may be placed directly by international customers or by U.S. customers who wish to deliver their orders to family or friends at international addresses. The company is using a third party provider, FiftyOne Global Ecommerce, to facilitate the checkout and exporting of orders.  Shoppers will be able to use the currencies of the countries where they are buying from.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour said Thursday that it hired a former executive with the Orvis Co. to head its e-commerce business. John Rogers, who most recently was vice president of multi-channel marketing at Orvis Co., will join Under Armour in mid-May. Rogers has also worked at Toysmart.com and Hasbro. "Digital represents one of the most important places for our brand to connect with our young consumer," Kevin Plank, Under Armour founder and CEO said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Holly R. Gustafson, an investment analyst with Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. who specialized in e-commerce companies, died of ovarian cancer Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Reisterstown resident was 55. Ms. Gustafson was born and raised in Glastonbury, Conn., and earned her bachelor's degree in English in 1970 from the University of Wisconsin. In 1978, she earned a master's degree in city and regional planning from Catholic University of America in Washington, and a year later her master's in business from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- After scrambling for much of last year to prepare for what promised to be the first big holiday season for e-commerce, retailers got the swell of shoppers they'd expected -- and then some. What they didn't get, for the most part, were the large-scale customer service problems some had feared. Retailers attending the National Retail Federation's annual conference here looked back yesterday at the season that may well be a turning point for the industry. A big jump in online shopping indicated that the Internet will play a major role in a future where the customer -- not the merchant -- is in the driver's seat, say retailers and experts who track the industry.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
Last spring, Neil Sweren blew five months and $25,000 crafting a business plan for Fizbot.com, an online start-up he and his wife hoped would be their ticket to retirement by age 40. And why not? In cyberspace, millionaires were being minted nearly every day. Sweren figured his idea for a Web site catering to the for-sale-by-owner housing market was a sure bet. His lawyers heartily agreed. "All of the advice we got was that we were going to be able to raise big bucks," says Sweren, a 33-year-old mortgage broker in Owings Mills.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Jay Steinmetz is confident that 2002 will mean growth for his Baltimore dot-com company. "Now that the fallout has happened, the people who are still around are getting stronger," said Steinmetz, president and founder of Barcoding.com. The worst is over, experts said, and this year is expected to be more stable. The companies that will be successful selling online will be the more trusted brick-and-mortar businesses, said Steve Butler, senior e-business analyst for eMarketer Inc. in New York.
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