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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 3, 2012
The corruption scandal unfolding in Anne Arundel County in which the chief executive is accused of using his police protection detail to perform menial errands, steal campaign signs and run background checks on political opponents, hit a new lot Monday night. The Sun's Nicole Fuller reports that Deputy Police Chief Lt. Col. Emerson C. Davis testified to the county council: "Right now we are dysfunctional as a Police Department. Based on the circumstances that we find ourselves in today, it's awful suspect to say we're following our organizational values.
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HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
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NEWS
May 18, 2012
Our governor and the legislative leadership have given new meaning to the word "dysfunctional" as a description of the state's legislative process. The ineptitude that was exhibited during the 90-day legislative session and the dishonest dialogue coming from our state leaders in the special session is astounding. The governor proposed $1.2 billion in increased spending, then called it a "doomsday budget" when that amount was reduced by $500 million. The result - $700 million in new, increased spending and a tax increase to pay for it. How in the devil is this a cut in spending?
NEWS
September 14, 2014
According to The Sun's Jeff Zrebiec , Ozzie Newsome claims that Ray Rice did not lie to him about the incident in which Mr. Rice struck his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer ("Highlights from interview with Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, president Dick Cass and GM Ozzie Newsome," Sept. 11). Most would assume that means Mr. Rice did not minimize or represent what happened. Dick Cass, team president, states that he was told Mr. Rice slapped his fiancée and she hit her head. The video certainly proves that version to be wrong.
NEWS
By Linda Winer | February 10, 1992
ONE NIGHT this week, while reading the newsmagazines to the tune of "Inside Edition," I discovered yet another -- ba-boom, ba-boom -- danger of life in the '90s. I'm getting co-dependent on stories about dysfunctional families.I don't know what that means, but I'm sure it's happening.That particular night, my eyes were pressed to an item in New York magazine, the one that asked the epoch-defining question: "Which family is more dysfunctional? The Barrs, the Addamses or the Jacksons?"Before I could process my options, much less make a commitment to one celebrity malfunction over the others, I was distracted by someone on TV announcing that three dancers from "Madonna's dysfunctional 'Truth or Dare' family" are accusing her of being "obnoxious, selfish, loud" and they're suing her for not paying them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
"A Day Late and a Dollar Short," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 432 pages. 25.95. Dear Ms. McMillan: Girlfriend, you must be running out of material. You done wore out the mama thang and the sister thang already. So now you up in everybody's family business: outside children, aunties hooked on prescription pills, stepfathers with dirty minds. But what's up with all this forgiveness stuff? Chile, you in love -- or therapy? I predict that "A Day Late and a Dollar Short" will be a best seller and a made-for-TV movie.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 27, 2006
It's time to call a moratorium on the dysfunctional-family flick. Narcissistic, adulterous or conflicted moms, distant dads, drug-riddled youngsters - don't we get enough of them on "cutting-edge" TV series these days? Ryan Murphy, who created one of those series, Nip/Tuck, seized on Running With Scissors, Augusten Burroughs' acclaimed memoir of a loony adolescence, for the comedy-drama opening today. But all he does with this prized dysfunctional-family property is turn it into a crazed Carter-era comic strip: For Better or for Worse on acid.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 5, 1994
"Birdland," ABC's new one-hour drama starring Brian Dennehy, is a celebration of the dysfunctional, the semi-functional, the unhappily functioning and the just-plain screwed-up. It's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" sanitized and sweetened for prime-time.If you love seeing exhibitions of things that don't work, tune in the premiere at 10 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).Dennehy plays the chief of a psychiatric unit in an Oakland hospital. He treats the dysfunctional for a living.Tonight's case involves a boy who can't sleep and who recently put his arm through his bedroom window.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 21, 2007
The Ravens are struggling through an eight-game losing streak, but it could be worse - a lot worse. How? Two words. Atlanta Falcons. The Falcons are probably the worst-positioned franchise in the NFL, maybe in all of major pro sports. Think about it. Michael Vick's situation leaves an enormous talent vacuum. The coach they started the season with just ran out on them. The owner, Arthur Blank, has indicated he has lost confidence in the guy who was running the franchise, Rich McKay. Bill Parcells, the guy who was going to plot their football future, spurned them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 7, 1993
If it weren't so good, it would be glib fun to dismiss "Olivier Olivier" as a fractured fairy tale for recondite adult tastes; it's about a little boy on his way to grandmother's house with a food basket who is set upon by a wolf.Yet that symbolic overlay is never intrusive or self-conscious; it's part of the quiet, clammy art of the film which advances through horror one intimate detail after another. Directed by the legendary Agnieszka Holland ("Europa, Europa"), the film is an existential thriller as chilly and dislocating as anything by Chabrol or Sluizer or Hitchcock, other masters of the art."
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Just when it seemed the situation in Iraq couldn't get any worse, the government moved a step closer to collapsing into chaos on Sunday when its president, Fuad Masum, formally nominated a candidate to replace the country's authoritarian prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, in an effort to break the political paralysis gripping the country since parliamentary elections in April. From there, things went straight downhill. President Masum named Haider Abadi, a member of Mr. Maliki's own Shiite Islamist Dawa Party, as the next prime minister, urging him to forge a broad coalition government to unify the country against Sunni extremists who have taken over large swaths of Iraq in recent weeks and are threatening to march on the capital.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
On the eve of ending his tenure on the Howard County school board, Brian Meshkin recounted what he considers accomplishments and challenges while on the panel — offering glimpses into a system regarded among the best in the state but that he said is often hindered by personality clashes. He said he relished being part of the school board's efforts to implement cost-saving measures during the recession while upgrading its digital technology; yet he bemoaned a board atmosphere he described as acrimonious and dysfunctional, and included himself in his assessment of a panel that he says is made up of "good people" who don't always work well together.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
The online exchange where Maryland's uninsured can buy coverage under the Affordable Care Act has been troubled since its Oct. 1 launch, prompting media outlets and others to dig into what went wrong. There have been at least 65 requests for information under the state's public records laws, including emails among staff, invoices, contract details and other data. Now the head of the exchange says the effort to provide the public with information has become an undue burden on lawyers and other staffers, who are still trying to fix the site.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
After "60 Minutes" ran a devastating piece on the deadly attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey O. Graham pledged to block President Barack Obama's nominees for Federal Reserve chairman and for the next secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Last week, after the CBS report was retracted because the star witness interviewed in the report, a former British security contractor, had been caught lying about whether he was at the site of the attack, the senator's position did not change.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 9, 2013
Last August before a closed meeting of Republican leaders in Boston, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said, "We are not a debating society. We are a political operation that needs to win. " Tuesday night, Mr. Christie won. Big time. In one of the nation's bluest states, Governor Christie got 60.5 percent of the vote. His Democratic opponent, Barbara Buono, claims she lost because "Democratic political bosses" made a deal with Mr. Christie "despite him representing almost everything they're against.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
How much have media sins contributed to the toxic tone and deadly dysfunction in D.C.? That's one of the questions tackled in the conversation Sunday morning that I was part of with Howard Kurtz and James Rosen. Check it out. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
SPORTS
October 2, 2005
Nothing can top what happened at Camden Yards this season, but it's nice to know the Orioles haven't cornered the market on dysfunctional families. Here's a brief rundown of an ugly month in Miami: The Florida Marlins were leading the wild-card race Sept. 12 and then dropped 12 of 15 to fall into last place in the National League East. Pitcher A.J. Burnett blew up in the clubhouse last Sunday, criticizing the coaching staff for its contagious negativity. The next day, Burnett, who helped carry the Marlins after the All-Star break but slumped down the stretch, was booted from the team by manager Jack McKeon.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | July 23, 2008
The Chesapeake Arts Center continues its tradition of presenting plays that are part of the annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, now in its 27th year of showcasing local writing talent. For the second consecutive year, CAC is offering a work by Mark Scharf, one of this area's foremost playwrights with over 40 plays produced and a former three-term chairman of the festival. Keeping Faith is his first attempt at writing a full-length comedy, an endeavor he succeeds in by creating overly protective, anger-driven parents bungling an attempt to abduct their 18-year-old daughter on the eve of her wedding to a man more than twice her age. Scharf has expert assistance from CAC veteran comedy director C.J. Crowe and her four-person cast, each skilled at projecting human frailties to coax our chuckles of recognition.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
On the face of it, you can hardly blame City Council members for voting unanimously last week to block Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to transfer $100,000 from the Department of Recreation and Parks to the State's Attorney's Office. The optics of taking money away from programs that help city young people stay out of trouble and giving it instead to an agency that puts them in jail were beyond awful. On top of that, many council members and their constituents were rightly taken aback by the idea the city would raid parks and recreation's piggy bank whenever it needs extra cash for other projects.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday she's long been frustrated by the city liquor board's dysfunction and is glad its commissioners are pledging reform. "It's frustrating for me, and has been, as a city elected official knowing that the liquor board's principal positions are patronage positions controlled by the state senators. Historically, they've answered very little to the City Council," Rawlings-Blake said after the city's Board of Estimates meeting. "Yet when people call because of a problem at a liquor store, they don't hold the senators or the state responsible.
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