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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Maryland's controversial dynamometer test for vehicle emissions would remain voluntary under a bill approved by a state Senate committee yesterday.The bill, approved 8-3 by the Judicial Proceedings Committee, would prohibit the state from making the test mandatory. Without the legislation, the tests would be required of most vehicles in the most populous areas of the state as of June 1.But many drivers object to the test, saying they worry about damage to their cars and the accuracy of the dynamometer exam.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons and Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
From Hagerstown to Grasonville, motorists who ventured into vehicle emissions testing centers yesterday discovered their universe had changed.The good news: No waiting, at least not on the first day of mandatory dynamometer testing. The bad news: Check out those last three words.For the first time, car owners in Baltimore and 13 counties had no choice but to confront the hotly debated treadmill test so touted by environmentalists and dreaded by talk show hosts and car enthusiasts.They watched in glass-enclosed waiting rooms as cheerful strangers took their keys and drove their cars on rollers at speeds equivalent to 55 mph.For some it was an annoyance.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1996
Attention coupon clippers: The state is offering $2 off a controversial vehicle emissions test.The coupon is one of several changes that officials hope will combat public apprehension about the Maryland Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program.The coupon is valid only on the dynamometer, a treadmill-like device that provoked a public outcry when introduced last year. State transportation and environmental officials said yesterday they hope the savings will entice more Marylanders to volunteer their cars for testing on the dynamometer.
NEWS
June 11, 1997
Britain's gesture was overdue but welcomePrime Minister Tony Blair's admission of Britain's blame for the Irish famine of 1845-50, although 150 years late, was most welcome.The famine, among the worst atrocities in history, reduced Ireland's population by 50 percent -- over one million deaths and in excess of two million by migration. This to a nation that led Europe through the dark ages.I hope that this healing gesture will prompt a cease fire by the IRA and enable Sinn Fein to participate with other parties in the Northern Ireland negotiations in the hope of reducing the bitterness and enhancing the lives of all in Northern Ireland, both Catholic and Protestant.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | March 19, 1997
The Senate approved a bill yesterday that would keep the state's treadmill-like vehicle emissions test voluntary, despite warnings from federal officials that Maryland could lose up to $98 million in transportation money for failing to make the program mandatory.State senators voted 25-21 in favor of the voluntary program. Supporters of the bill said they have received numerous complaints from motorists that the test, which uses a treadmill-like device called a dynamometer, damaged their cars.
NEWS
May 3, 1997
I AM WRITING in response to your April 29 editorial, "Glendening's first veto." Everyone I know, liberal or conservative, wants clean air.The problem with this or any other emission test is that many factors are involved in whether or not a car passes the test. In other words, the best any test can do without causing great inconvenience to everyone is to catch the gross polluters.I take issue with several points made. The cars are subjected to much more than just pressing on the accelerator by an attendant.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
A state Senate committee is expected to approve a bill that would keep Maryland's treadmill-like emissions test voluntary, despite the Glendening administration's push to make it mandatory.At a Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee hearing yesterday, members voiced concern about the dynamometer emissions test damaging cars because the engines would be run at high speeds. The lawmakers complained that they haven't seen sufficient evidence that the dynamometer is more accurate than the tailpipe test that is required now."
NEWS
February 27, 1997
Require tune-ups, not emissions testsMandatory emissions testing is a nuisance procedure to determine what is already known -- that a majority of Maryland automobiles need a tune-up.Mandatory tune-up certification submitted along with license plate applications and renewals would clean the air significantly, save gasoline and eliminate the need for emissions testing.atrick DempseyOcean CityDynamometer test was a nightmareI read with interest William C. Baker's Feb. 17 letter describing his nine-minute "happy experience," while his car underwent the Vehicle Emission Inspection Program's dynamometer test.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | June 8, 1997
WHO'S against clean air? Not I. Not you. What some of us are against, however, is the manner in which that essential substance we breathe is cleansed. Specifically, the cost and inconvenience of such purifying remedies.The governor, with appreciative cheerleaders from the business community, has virtually assured that most autos in Maryland will be required to pass a dynamometer test every two years. That means giving the keys to an emissions station "technician" to drive your car on a treadmill at speeds up to 55 mph.And that has upset a lot of people, whether they be the vocal minority or the silent majority of affected motorists.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons and Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
The long lines of fuming motorists may be gone, but questions remain about how Maryland's controversial vehicle emissions inspections program will fare when the unpopular treadmill-like dynamometer test becomes mandatory in the fall.Bucking polls that show roughly half of Marylanders object to putting their vehicles on the dynamometer, Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week vetoed legislation that would have kept the test voluntary.Glendening's action pleased environmentalists and health advocates, who contend that vehicle emissions checks every other year are a small price to pay to help reduce air pollution and restore the Chesapeake Bay.But angry critics of the tests -- flooding conservative radio talk shows -- complain about having to surrender their keys to a technician and watch their cars and trucks be "driven" on rollers at up to 55 mph.State officials, mindful of the public outcry and the start-up problems that derailed mandatory dynamometer testing two years ago, said last week they are working to ensure the inspections go smoothly and are as "customer-friendly" as possible.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | June 8, 1997
WHO'S against clean air? Not I. Not you. What some of us are against, however, is the manner in which that essential substance we breathe is cleansed. Specifically, the cost and inconvenience of such purifying remedies.The governor, with appreciative cheerleaders from the business community, has virtually assured that most autos in Maryland will be required to pass a dynamometer test every two years. That means giving the keys to an emissions station "technician" to drive your car on a treadmill at speeds up to 55 mph.And that has upset a lot of people, whether they be the vocal minority or the silent majority of affected motorists.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons and Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
The long lines of fuming motorists may be gone, but questions remain about how Maryland's controversial vehicle emissions inspections program will fare when the unpopular treadmill-like dynamometer test becomes mandatory in the fall.Bucking polls that show roughly half of Marylanders object to putting their vehicles on the dynamometer, Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week vetoed legislation that would have kept the test voluntary.Glendening's action pleased environmentalists and health advocates, who contend that vehicle emissions checks every other year are a small price to pay to help reduce air pollution and restore the Chesapeake Bay.But angry critics of the tests -- flooding conservative radio talk shows -- complain about having to surrender their keys to a technician and watch their cars and trucks be "driven" on rollers at up to 55 mph.State officials, mindful of the public outcry and the start-up problems that derailed mandatory dynamometer testing two years ago, said last week they are working to ensure the inspections go smoothly and are as "customer-friendly" as possible.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Timothy B. Wheeler and Thomas W. Waldron and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Dru Schmidt-Perkins, regional director of Clean Water Action, was misquoted in an article yesterday about Maryland's vehicle emissions inspection program. She said the governor was able to rise above the rhetoric of a "vocal minority."The Sun regrets the errors.Risking political retribution from angry Maryland motorists, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that he will allow the state's treadmill-style vehicle emissions test to become mandatory later this year.Ending weeks of discussion, Glendening vetoed a bill passed by the General Assembly that would have kept the controversial tests voluntary.
NEWS
May 11, 1997
Bomb threats must not be toleratedOn behalf of the parents of Bodkin Elementary PTA, I would like to commend our principal, Rocco Ferretti, his teachers and staff for their outstanding efforts in securing the safety of more than 630 elementary school students and building occoupants during a bomb threat on May 1, within an hour after an incident at adjacent Chesapeake High.Mr. Ferretti and his faculty orchestrated the orderly evacuation of students from the school to Our Lady of the Chesapeake Catholic Church, where buses picked up students to return them safely home.
NEWS
May 3, 1997
I AM WRITING in response to your April 29 editorial, "Glendening's first veto." Everyone I know, liberal or conservative, wants clean air.The problem with this or any other emission test is that many factors are involved in whether or not a car passes the test. In other words, the best any test can do without causing great inconvenience to everyone is to catch the gross polluters.I take issue with several points made. The cars are subjected to much more than just pressing on the accelerator by an attendant.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Ignoring an explicit warning that the federal government will punish the state for failing to meet clean air standards, the House of Delegates gave final approval yesterday to legislation that would keep Maryland's treadmill-like vehicle emissions test voluntary.The bill now goes to Gov. Parris N. Glendening for signature or veto. Although three of his Cabinet secretaries have lobbied against the bill, Glendening has declined to say what he will do.The House voted 83-46 to approve the bill after hearing jTC assurances from a committee chairman that the state would have 18 to 24 months to negotiate with the Environmental Protection Agency to avoid sanctions that could cost the state as much as $98 million in transportation funds.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Ignoring an explicit warning that the federal government will punish the state for failing to meet clean air standards, the House of Delegates gave final approval yesterday to legislation that would keep Maryland's treadmill-like vehicle emissions test voluntary.The bill now goes to Gov. Parris N. Glendening for signature or veto. Although three of his Cabinet secretaries have lobbied against the bill, Glendening has declined to say what he will do.The House voted 83-46 to approve the bill after hearing jTC assurances from a committee chairman that the state would have 18 to 24 months to negotiate with the Environmental Protection Agency to avoid sanctions that could cost the state as much as $98 million in transportation funds.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1997
Moving to meet federal air-quality standards, the state will push ahead with plans to require most Maryland motorists to have their cars tested on treadmill-like devices beginning in June, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday.Despite some opposition from legislators and critics who say the dynamometer test is an unnecessary intrusion, the governor said that "it's time to proceed.""We've got to do something to be more effective with the air quality in Maryland," the governor said.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
What do drugs have to do with forgery? PlentyI am responding to your editorial of March 10, "Larry's Used Cars." One paragraph of the editorial dealt with a forged prescription and its relationship to drug trafficking.As a practicing pharmacist for more than 35 years, I can state unequivocally that prescription drug abuse and trafficking are as big a problem as cocaine.On a daily basis, pharmacists are confronted with forged or altered prescriptions for narcotic drugs, central nervous depressants and central nervous stimulants.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Warning that Maryland stands to lose almost $100 million in federal highway funds, Gov. Parris N. Glendening appealed yesterday for "calmer voices" in the House of Delegates to avoid RTC a confrontation with the Environmental Protection Agency over vehicle emissions testing.Joining EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner at the Naval Academy for an announcement of federal grants to Maryland in connection with the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Glendening stopped short of threatening to veto a bill passed by the Senate Monday that would keep the unpopular dynamometer emissions tests voluntary.
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