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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Warning that Maryland stands to lose almost $100 million in federal highway funds, Gov. Parris N. Glendening appealed yesterday for "calmer voices" in the House of Delegates to avoid RTC a confrontation with the Environmental Protection Agency over vehicle emissions testing.Joining EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner at the Naval Academy for an announcement of federal grants to Maryland in connection with the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Glendening stopped short of threatening to veto a bill passed by the Senate Monday that would keep the unpopular dynamometer emissions tests voluntary.
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NEWS
By Craig K. Paskoski and Craig K. Paskoski,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
The state's vehicle emissions program is changing the way it tests newer cars, but the effect should be minimal on motorists when they visit a testing station. Beginning today, Maryland's Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program will use a computerized scan test for cars and light trucks of model year 1996 and later. The "on-board diagnostics" test will replace mandatory dynamometer testing for those vehicles. The test enables technicians at testing stations to link monitors with a vehicle's in-dash engine computer.
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NEWS
September 30, 1997
STARTING TOMORROW, most vehicle owners in the state must put their automobiles through a controversial treadmill test (the dynamometer) as part of the required two-year emissions inspection program. Previously, the treadmill test had been voluntary. Yet judging from the half-million motorists who have already experienced the dynamometer, it's no big deal.The chief beneficiaries of this change will be all who breathe in the state. The very young, the elderly and the 600,000 Marylanders with respiratory problems are most vulnerable to auto-caused smog.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons and Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
From Hagerstown to Grasonville, motorists who ventured into vehicle emissions testing centers yesterday discovered their universe had changed.The good news: No waiting, at least not on the first day of mandatory dynamometer testing. The bad news: Check out those last three words.For the first time, car owners in Baltimore and 13 counties had no choice but to confront the hotly debated treadmill test so touted by environmentalists and dreaded by talk show hosts and car enthusiasts.They watched in glass-enclosed waiting rooms as cheerful strangers took their keys and drove their cars on rollers at speeds equivalent to 55 mph.For some it was an annoyance.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons and Peter Jensen and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
From Hagerstown to Grasonville, motorists who ventured into vehicle emissions testing centers yesterday discovered their universe had changed.The good news: No waiting, at least not on the first day of mandatory dynamometer testing. The bad news: Check out those last three words.For the first time, car owners in Baltimore and 13 counties had no choice but to confront the hotly debated treadmill test so touted by environmentalists and dreaded by talk show hosts and car enthusiasts.They watched in glass-enclosed waiting rooms as cheerful strangers took their keys and drove their cars on rollers at speeds equivalent to 55 mph.For some it was an annoyance.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
For Mary Bontempo, O'Dette McDonald and Sister Katherine Nueslein, clean air is a cause worth fighting for.They hardly seem the combative type. One is a nun, one an employee of a home health care company and one a community outreach worker for a church.Yet the Baltimore women are behind a federal lawsuit that could require owners of all motor vehicles in Maryland to submit them to a controversial treadmill-like device, called a dynamometer. The intention is to improve air quality by reducing auto emissions.
NEWS
By Craig K. Paskoski and Craig K. Paskoski,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
The state's vehicle emissions program is changing the way it tests newer cars, but the effect should be minimal on motorists when they visit a testing station. Beginning today, Maryland's Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program will use a computerized scan test for cars and light trucks of model year 1996 and later. The "on-board diagnostics" test will replace mandatory dynamometer testing for those vehicles. The test enables technicians at testing stations to link monitors with a vehicle's in-dash engine computer.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
A top federal official threatened yesterday to freeze money for Maryland highway projects by the end of the year unless Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoes legislation that would keep a controversial vehicle emissions test voluntary."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval last night to a bill that defies Washington's demand for a mandatory treadmill test of auto emissions in Maryland.The bill, a similar version of which has already passed the state Senate, would allow motorists to choose to have their vehicles tested on the treadmill-like dynamometer -- or not.Final General Assembly approval of the legislation is considered likely, leaving Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a dilemma:Should he accept the will of the Assembly and motorists who object to the testing requirement?
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
After surviving its own treadmill of political debate and performance problems for nearly three years, a stricter vehicle emissions test is about to become mandatory in Maryland.Drivers, here's fair warning: Beginning Wednesday, the first 25,000 notices will start showing up in the mail summoning cars and light trucks to one of 19 state-owned centers for required dynamometer testing.Unlike the traditional tailpipe test, which has been standard in Maryland since 1984, cars will be driven on a treadmill by an attendant.
NEWS
September 30, 1997
STARTING TOMORROW, most vehicle owners in the state must put their automobiles through a controversial treadmill test (the dynamometer) as part of the required two-year emissions inspection program. Previously, the treadmill test had been voluntary. Yet judging from the half-million motorists who have already experienced the dynamometer, it's no big deal.The chief beneficiaries of this change will be all who breathe in the state. The very young, the elderly and the 600,000 Marylanders with respiratory problems are most vulnerable to auto-caused smog.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
After surviving its own treadmill of political debate and performance problems for nearly three years, a stricter vehicle emissions test is about to become mandatory in Maryland.Drivers, here's fair warning: Beginning Wednesday, the first 25,000 notices will start showing up in the mail summoning cars and light trucks to one of 19 state-owned centers for required dynamometer testing.Unlike the traditional tailpipe test, which has been standard in Maryland since 1984, cars will be driven on a treadmill by an attendant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons and Timothy B. Wheeler and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
The long lines of fuming motorists may be gone, but questions remain about how Maryland's controversial vehicle emissions inspections program will fare when the unpopular treadmill-like dynamometer test becomes mandatory in the fall.Bucking polls that show roughly half of Marylanders object to putting their vehicles on the dynamometer, Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week vetoed legislation that would have kept the test voluntary.Glendening's action pleased environmentalists and health advocates, who contend that vehicle emissions checks every other year are a small price to pay to help reduce air pollution and restore the Chesapeake Bay.But angry critics of the tests -- flooding conservative radio talk shows -- complain about having to surrender their keys to a technician and watch their cars and trucks be "driven" on rollers at up to 55 mph.State officials, mindful of the public outcry and the start-up problems that derailed mandatory dynamometer testing two years ago, said last week they are working to ensure the inspections go smoothly and are as "customer-friendly" as possible.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
A top federal official threatened yesterday to freeze money for Maryland highway projects by the end of the year unless Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoes legislation that would keep a controversial vehicle emissions test voluntary."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval last night to a bill that defies Washington's demand for a mandatory treadmill test of auto emissions in Maryland.The bill, a similar version of which has already passed the state Senate, would allow motorists to choose to have their vehicles tested on the treadmill-like dynamometer -- or not.Final General Assembly approval of the legislation is considered likely, leaving Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a dilemma:Should he accept the will of the Assembly and motorists who object to the testing requirement?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Warning that Maryland stands to lose almost $100 million in federal highway funds, Gov. Parris N. Glendening appealed yesterday for "calmer voices" in the House of Delegates to avoid RTC a confrontation with the Environmental Protection Agency over vehicle emissions testing.Joining EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner at the Naval Academy for an announcement of federal grants to Maryland in connection with the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Glendening stopped short of threatening to veto a bill passed by the Senate Monday that would keep the unpopular dynamometer emissions tests voluntary.
NEWS
March 5, 1997
Dynamometer test is small price to payTom Horton's recent comparison of treadmills and dynamometers finally brings the whole "enhanced vehicle emission inspection program" into a focus ordinary citizens can understand.Sit behind a dirty tailpipe throughout a two-minute traffic light and you are angry with the car and its owner. We all have tailpipe emissions, every car and every minute we drive that car. Add it up. The point is to cut the polluting emissions from the worst-polluting vehicles and the dynamometer and trained personnel can do that.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
Dynamometer test fight has stalledThe status of the bills presently before the House and Senate committees that would save the public from compulsory dynamometer testing this June are in critical danger of failure.I have been following this issue closely, and feel that the public deserves to know what's going on in Annapolis.We now have only three weeks remaining in the current session. If Senate Bill 278 and House Bill 760 have not completed their journeys through the Senate and House within the remaining weeks of the session, the bills die and compulsory dyno is the law in Maryland.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | March 19, 1997
The Senate approved a bill yesterday that would keep the state's treadmill-like vehicle emissions test voluntary, despite warnings from federal officials that Maryland could lose up to $98 million in transportation money for failing to make the program mandatory.State senators voted 25-21 in favor of the voluntary program. Supporters of the bill said they have received numerous complaints from motorists that the test, which uses a treadmill-like device called a dynamometer, damaged their cars.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
Dynamometer test fight has stalledThe status of the bills presently before the House and Senate committees that would save the public from compulsory dynamometer testing this June are in critical danger of failure.I have been following this issue closely, and feel that the public deserves to know what's going on in Annapolis.We now have only three weeks remaining in the current session. If Senate Bill 278 and House Bill 760 have not completed their journeys through the Senate and House within the remaining weeks of the session, the bills die and compulsory dyno is the law in Maryland.
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