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Dylan Thomas

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By Merle Rubin and Merle Rubin,Los Angeles Times | July 18, 2004
Dylan Thomas: A New Life, by Andrew Lycett. Overlook Press. 434 pages. $35. At the time of his death in 1953, Dylan Thomas seemed the epitome of everything expected of a poet: brilliant, impulsive, unconventional and reckless; a prodigious drinker, an incorrigible skirt-chaser, a marvelous storyteller and a spellbinding reader of his own and other people's verse. Even Philip Larkin, hardly a kindred spirit poetically or politically, felt a keen sense of loss: "I can't believe that D.T. is truly dead.
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NEWS
March 16, 2005
On March 15, 2005, PAUL JOHN, beloved husband of the late Mary Janicki (nee Rose) devoted father of Michael Janicki and his wife Jacqueline and Paula Kingsley and her husband Wayne, dear brother of Ray, Edward and Melvin Janicki, Rose Szymanski and Josie Ellis, cherished grandfather of Lisa Janicki and Melissa Thomas, great-grandfather of Dylan Thomas. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral services will be held on Friday 11 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2003
SWANSEA, Wales - To begin at the beginning: Dylan Thomas was born here in 1914, and his writing, a refined form of raw, was met with worldwide acclaim soon after. He lived hard and died young, common elements in the creation of legend, the pictures his words drew not hurting. Here, though, in this coastal town of his inspiration, of silent gray crags that plunge into crashing white foam and of days that end with blue-orange sunsets swallowed by the sea, Thomas was buried as a son long unclaimed by the Welsh, and so he remained in the decades to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Merle Rubin and Merle Rubin,Los Angeles Times | July 18, 2004
Dylan Thomas: A New Life, by Andrew Lycett. Overlook Press. 434 pages. $35. At the time of his death in 1953, Dylan Thomas seemed the epitome of everything expected of a poet: brilliant, impulsive, unconventional and reckless; a prodigious drinker, an incorrigible skirt-chaser, a marvelous storyteller and a spellbinding reader of his own and other people's verse. Even Philip Larkin, hardly a kindred spirit poetically or politically, felt a keen sense of loss: "I can't believe that D.T. is truly dead.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
John Malcolm Brinnin, 81, a prize-winning poet, critic, anthologist and teacher who first brought Welsh poet Dylan Thomas to the United States, died Thursday in Key West, Fla. Mr. Brinnin taught poetry at Vassar College, Boston University, the University of Connecticut and Harvard University, and his books included the 1955 memoir "Dylan Thomas in America."Pub Date: 6/28/98
NEWS
March 16, 2005
On March 15, 2005, PAUL JOHN, beloved husband of the late Mary Janicki (nee Rose) devoted father of Michael Janicki and his wife Jacqueline and Paula Kingsley and her husband Wayne, dear brother of Ray, Edward and Melvin Janicki, Rose Szymanski and Josie Ellis, cherished grandfather of Lisa Janicki and Melissa Thomas, great-grandfather of Dylan Thomas. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral services will be held on Friday 11 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Fifty years have passed since two young women hauled the great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas into a studio in New York City where he read the story A Child's Christmas in Wales and the half-dozen poems that became one of the most popular recordings in the history of literature. All three were making their first record. Barbara Cohen Holdridge and Marianne Roney Mantell, both then 22, were founding Caedmon Records with about $1,500 and more or less unlimited hope. They gave Thomas a $500 advance and a promise of 10 percent of the royalties.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER TEENAGE WASTELAND: SUBURBIA'S DEAD END KIDS. Donna Gaines. Pantheon. 235 pages. $23. and DIANE SCHARPER TEENAGE WASTELAND: SUBURBIA'S DEAD END KIDS. Donna Gaines. Pantheon. 235 pages. $23.,LOS ANGELES TIMES THE LAST KAMIKAZE. M. E. Morris. Random House. 350 pages. $19.95 | June 2, 1991
QUENCH THE LAMP.Alice Taylor.St. Martin's.173 pages. $14.95."Quench the Lamp" reads like a prose poem written to childhood. Here, Alice Taylor looks back to rural Ireland of the late 1940s and early 1950s and writes a sequel to her earlier memoir, "To School Through the Fields." These are simple descriptive stories that show Ms. Taylor bound to her past by countless ties of love.Closely observing friends in County Cork, she focuses on "souls [that] easily awaken to poetry." Take Bridgie washing the heavy lace bedspread and wondering aloud: "How many did you born?
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | October 29, 1993
Plays described as plotless usually don't become classics. But Howard Community College has an exception to begin its 1993-94 Mainstage Series."Under Milk Wood," by Dylan Thomas, will be performed by the Sherman Theatre Company of Cardiff, Wales, today and tomorrow at the college's Smith Theatre.Called "a play for voices," "Under Milk Wood" was completed a month before Thomas' death on Nov. 9, 1953, before a final revision."It plays very warm, very funny. It's a play about characters and capturing Welsh culture," said Kasi Campbell, general manager for the performing arts division of HCC."
NEWS
August 28, 2003
On August 26, 2003, RAYMOND E.; beloved husband of Jeanne M. (nee Gilbert); devoted father of Dylan Missimer; devoted son of Velma Schuur and the late John Twele; dear brother of Michael, Patrick, Sue Twele and Martie Wiley; grandfather of Dylan Thomas Missimer, II. Also survived by many aunts, uncles, cousins and in-laws. Funeral services will be held at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck Funeral Home, Inc., 5305 Harford Road (at Echodale), on Friday, at 11:30 A.M. Interment Gardens fo Faith Cemetery,.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2003
SWANSEA, Wales - To begin at the beginning: Dylan Thomas was born here in 1914, and his writing, a refined form of raw, was met with worldwide acclaim soon after. He lived hard and died young, common elements in the creation of legend, the pictures his words drew not hurting. Here, though, in this coastal town of his inspiration, of silent gray crags that plunge into crashing white foam and of days that end with blue-orange sunsets swallowed by the sea, Thomas was buried as a son long unclaimed by the Welsh, and so he remained in the decades to follow.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Fifty years have passed since two young women hauled the great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas into a studio in New York City where he read the story A Child's Christmas in Wales and the half-dozen poems that became one of the most popular recordings in the history of literature. All three were making their first record. Barbara Cohen Holdridge and Marianne Roney Mantell, both then 22, were founding Caedmon Records with about $1,500 and more or less unlimited hope. They gave Thomas a $500 advance and a promise of 10 percent of the royalties.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
John Malcolm Brinnin, 81, a prize-winning poet, critic, anthologist and teacher who first brought Welsh poet Dylan Thomas to the United States, died Thursday in Key West, Fla. Mr. Brinnin taught poetry at Vassar College, Boston University, the University of Connecticut and Harvard University, and his books included the 1955 memoir "Dylan Thomas in America."Pub Date: 6/28/98
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | October 29, 1993
Plays described as plotless usually don't become classics. But Howard Community College has an exception to begin its 1993-94 Mainstage Series."Under Milk Wood," by Dylan Thomas, will be performed by the Sherman Theatre Company of Cardiff, Wales, today and tomorrow at the college's Smith Theatre.Called "a play for voices," "Under Milk Wood" was completed a month before Thomas' death on Nov. 9, 1953, before a final revision."It plays very warm, very funny. It's a play about characters and capturing Welsh culture," said Kasi Campbell, general manager for the performing arts division of HCC."
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER TEENAGE WASTELAND: SUBURBIA'S DEAD END KIDS. Donna Gaines. Pantheon. 235 pages. $23. and DIANE SCHARPER TEENAGE WASTELAND: SUBURBIA'S DEAD END KIDS. Donna Gaines. Pantheon. 235 pages. $23.,LOS ANGELES TIMES THE LAST KAMIKAZE. M. E. Morris. Random House. 350 pages. $19.95 | June 2, 1991
QUENCH THE LAMP.Alice Taylor.St. Martin's.173 pages. $14.95."Quench the Lamp" reads like a prose poem written to childhood. Here, Alice Taylor looks back to rural Ireland of the late 1940s and early 1950s and writes a sequel to her earlier memoir, "To School Through the Fields." These are simple descriptive stories that show Ms. Taylor bound to her past by countless ties of love.Closely observing friends in County Cork, she focuses on "souls [that] easily awaken to poetry." Take Bridgie washing the heavy lace bedspread and wondering aloud: "How many did you born?
FEATURES
November 24, 1999
Every Christmas needs one good read-aloud story to pull at the heart strings. Yes, you could watch "It's a Wonderful Life" (we do), but we're talking about having a house full of family and friends that serves as the perfect captive audience for reading aloud.Try these:"The Polar Express," by Chris Van Allsburg"A Christmas Memory," by Truman Capote"Star Mother's Youngest Child," by Louise Moeri"A Child's Christmas in Wales," by Dylan Thomas"A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens"The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey," by Susan Wojciechowski"Santa Calls," by William Joyce-- Valerie & Walter's Best Books for Children by Valerie V. Lewis and Walter M. Mayes
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1999
Samuel Beckett, 1906-1989;Born to a prosperous Protestant family in the Dublin suburb of Foxrock, Beckett attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied modern languages. He traveled widely in Europe in the 1930s before settling in Paris, where he became a close disciple of James Joyce.Beckett wrote many novels, including "Murphy," which Dylan Thomas called "Freudian blarney," and "Molloy," which explores a mysterious Jekyll and Hyde relationship between two men, Maron and Molloy.He considered himself to be primarily a novelist, but it was with his play "Waiting for Godot" in 1954 that Beckett gained celebrity status.
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