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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 14, 1990
"Hardware" appears to have been photographed through an orange Chuckle. Everything in it is a gelid orangey hue that is supposed to communicate the aridity and temperature of the future. Instead it had the effect on this reviewer of reminding him that he likes the green Chuckle the bestThe movie is a grim, drab science-fiction horror number that spends so much time being arty it never becomes good. Set in the by-now-banal post-apocalypse future, it develops the by-now-banal "evil robot" line, but without a lot of conviction and with a great deal of banality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | December 13, 2012
What is it about guys named Morgan turning into serial killers? First there was Dexter Morgan and now Johnny Morgan, the modern-day Bloody Face, played by Dylan McDermott. At least Dexter saves his dark passenger for deserving victims. As Johnny tells a psychiatrist about his experience skinning cats and his compulsions to hurt woman, we learn that Johnny Morgan isn't who he said he was.  "You see, my name isn't Morgan," he tells the psychiatrist. "My name is Thredson. I'm the son of Bloody Face.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Television actors who attempt to branch out into feature films are frequently dismissed as tackling material that is out of their element, a criticism that isn't applicable to the stars of "Three to Tango."If anything, Matthew Perry, Neve Campbell and Dylan McDermott, familiar young faces on the small screen, are cheated by the new film, which basically requires them to ape their television personas.Perry, the witty guy from "Friends," Campbell, the headstrong young woman from "Party of Five," and McDermott, the driven attorney from "The Practice," are called upon to be witty, headstrong and driven, respectively.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
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By Lou Cedrone | September 18, 1990
''Hardware'' is a hard watch. Yeah, it's an old, familiar expression, but this is a very familiar film, one that was done in England and Morocco and plays like a closet version of ''Alien.''It also plays like ''Friday the 13th, X.'' The gore is overwhelmingly repugnant. You'll be looking away much of the time. If you're smart, you'll look the other way all the time.''Hardware'' is futuristic. We know that from the first frame, one that scans the desert to pick up what looks like a street person.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
Don't feel too bad about giving up on " 'Til There Was You." Its makers did.The film is one of those romantic comedies whereby two lost souls meant for each other wend their way through a series of highly entertaining, tension-building contrivances before finally falling into each other's arms.In this case, though, the path to romance is laborious and tedious and, in the end, has very little to do with the plot. It's as though director Scott Winant finally said: "You know, I'm getting tired.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Will there ever be too many awards shows?"Blue Chips" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Nick Nolte plays a basketball coach faced with an unfortunate choice: a clear conscience or a championship team. Among the cast are past and present basketball players and coaches, including Amfernee Hardaway, Matt Nover, Bob Cousy, Marques Johnson, Larry Bird and Bobby Knight. Fox."The Blockbuster Entertainment Awards" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- That was close; I think we went three days without an awards program of some kind.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 8, 1992
Attention mental health practitioners. A cable movie premiering this weekend offers a new therapy for sufferers from agoraphobia and other panic disorders: psychotic killers.Just put your patient's son in jeopardy, with a knife at his throat, and even the most fearful phobic will finally get out of the house. That seems, at any rate, to be the prescription provided by "The Fear Inside," at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the Showtime premium service.The movie does pose interesting psychological questions, but not the ones in the script.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | December 13, 2012
What is it about guys named Morgan turning into serial killers? First there was Dexter Morgan and now Johnny Morgan, the modern-day Bloody Face, played by Dylan McDermott. At least Dexter saves his dark passenger for deserving victims. As Johnny tells a psychiatrist about his experience skinning cats and his compulsions to hurt woman, we learn that Johnny Morgan isn't who he said he was.  "You see, my name isn't Morgan," he tells the psychiatrist. "My name is Thredson. I'm the son of Bloody Face.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Television actors who attempt to branch out into feature films are frequently dismissed as tackling material that is out of their element, a criticism that isn't applicable to the stars of "Three to Tango."If anything, Matthew Perry, Neve Campbell and Dylan McDermott, familiar young faces on the small screen, are cheated by the new film, which basically requires them to ape their television personas.Perry, the witty guy from "Friends," Campbell, the headstrong young woman from "Party of Five," and McDermott, the driven attorney from "The Practice," are called upon to be witty, headstrong and driven, respectively.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
Don't feel too bad about giving up on " 'Til There Was You." Its makers did.The film is one of those romantic comedies whereby two lost souls meant for each other wend their way through a series of highly entertaining, tension-building contrivances before finally falling into each other's arms.In this case, though, the path to romance is laborious and tedious and, in the end, has very little to do with the plot. It's as though director Scott Winant finally said: "You know, I'm getting tired.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Will there ever be too many awards shows?"Blue Chips" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Nick Nolte plays a basketball coach faced with an unfortunate choice: a clear conscience or a championship team. Among the cast are past and present basketball players and coaches, including Amfernee Hardaway, Matt Nover, Bob Cousy, Marques Johnson, Larry Bird and Bobby Knight. Fox."The Blockbuster Entertainment Awards" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- That was close; I think we went three days without an awards program of some kind.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 9, 1993
You thought "Jurassic Park" was about dinosaurs? "In the Line of Fire" is the great dinosaur movie of the summer: It's about that most ancient and near-extinct of beasts, the hero who places his life on the line out of a sense of duty, honor and country.And at the same time it represents another vanishing species: the Hollywood thriller crafted brilliantly, tight, logical, completely believable and yet emotionally resonant. It's certainly the best movie of the summer.It's also Clint Eastwood's best movie as an actor since -- well, since Clint Eastwood started acting.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 8, 1992
Attention mental health practitioners. A cable movie premiering this weekend offers a new therapy for sufferers from agoraphobia and other panic disorders: psychotic killers.Just put your patient's son in jeopardy, with a knife at his throat, and even the most fearful phobic will finally get out of the house. That seems, at any rate, to be the prescription provided by "The Fear Inside," at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the Showtime premium service.The movie does pose interesting psychological questions, but not the ones in the script.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 18, 1990
''Hardware'' is a hard watch. Yeah, it's an old, familiar expression, but this is a very familiar film, one that was done in England and Morocco and plays like a closet version of ''Alien.''It also plays like ''Friday the 13th, X.'' The gore is overwhelmingly repugnant. You'll be looking away much of the time. If you're smart, you'll look the other way all the time.''Hardware'' is futuristic. We know that from the first frame, one that scans the desert to pick up what looks like a street person.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 9, 1993
You thought "Jurassic Park" was about dinosaurs? "In the Line of Fire" is the great dinosaur movie of the summer: It's about that most ancient and near-extinct of beasts, the hero who places his life on the line out of a sense of duty, honor and country.And at the same time it represents another vanishing species: the Hollywood thriller crafted brilliantly, tight, logical, completely believable and yet emotionally resonant. It's certainly the best movie of the summer.It's also Clint Eastwood's best movie as an actor since -- well, since Clint Eastwood started acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | April 28, 1995
With a title of "Destiny Turns on the Radio," you don't expect an ordinary movie.And with "Pulp Fiction"/pop culture maestro Quentin Tarantino playing a mythical character named Johnny Destiny, you don't even expect a halfway normal flick. What you get is a film that's calculated to be offbeat in the same obvious way that some Hollywood movies are prepackaged to be mainstream.This is the first feature of director Jack Baran, but it has definite Tarantino-ish touches. It's as rooted in '50s pop culture as Mr. Tarantino's pulp flicks are mired in the '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 14, 1990
"Hardware" appears to have been photographed through an orange Chuckle. Everything in it is a gelid orangey hue that is supposed to communicate the aridity and temperature of the future. Instead it had the effect on this reviewer of reminding him that he likes the green Chuckle the bestThe movie is a grim, drab science-fiction horror number that spends so much time being arty it never becomes good. Set in the by-now-banal post-apocalypse future, it develops the by-now-banal "evil robot" line, but without a lot of conviction and with a great deal of banality.
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