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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 1999
LITTLETON, Colo. -- Four days before the shootings, the principal of Columbine High School, Frank DeAngelis, told his students at an emotional pep rally in the gym that he did not want to bury another young person. With the prom set for the next night, Saturday, he implored them not to drink, or drink and drive, or put themselves at risk in any way."I do not want to attend another memorial service," he had said, recalling students who had died in car accidents, including a baseball player he had coached and two girlfriends of his teen-age daughter.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 19, 2014
Adam Lanza's father has broken his silence and, as we did in the immediate aftermath of the Newtown school shootings, we misunderstand. Peter Lanza reached out to author Andrew Solomon of The New Yorker at the first anniversary of the day when his 20-year-old son shot his mother, six teachers, 20 little kids and himself. They spent the next six months talking as the exacting Mr. Lanza clicked through the timeline of Adam's life, trying to understand what had happened. In the end, the father was no more successful than any of the experts who tried to explain the inexplicable.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 1999
DENVER -- The family of one of the 12 students killed in the Columbine High School shootings in nearby Littleton last month filed a $250 million lawsuit here Thursday against the parents of the two young gunmen.Michael and Vonda Shoels, the parents of Isaiah Shoels, an 18-year-old senior who was killed in the shootings on April 20, announced the lawsuit at a news conference here. They said they were suing to hold the parents accountable for their children's actions and to help make sure other parents were more responsible.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | January 13, 2011
It has become as familiar to us as the candlelight vigils at the crime scene. The modest house in a quiet neighborhood. The curtains drawn, the media camped out in the street. The neighbor's description of a family that kept to itself. And then the statement. The family is stunned. This is not the child they knew and loved. They are grieving, for that child as well as his victims. They apologize and offer prayers. Soon enough, the rest of this story will play out — again — for us. The child was troubled, and the family should have seen it. They should have seen the diary or the essays or the drawings or the website or the videos.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | January 13, 2011
It has become as familiar to us as the candlelight vigils at the crime scene. The modest house in a quiet neighborhood. The curtains drawn, the media camped out in the street. The neighbor's description of a family that kept to itself. And then the statement. The family is stunned. This is not the child they knew and loved. They are grieving, for that child as well as his victims. They apologize and offer prayers. Soon enough, the rest of this story will play out — again — for us. The child was troubled, and the family should have seen it. They should have seen the diary or the essays or the drawings or the website or the videos.
NEWS
By Sidney Zion | May 2, 1999
IN THE beginning, Cain slew Abel. So how come God didn't punish Adam and Eve? They had eaten the forbidden fruit and should have known that Cain had a serious case of sibling rivalry that might easily develop into fratricide. But the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, gave the first parents a pass, despite their obvious retreat into denial. Now, on the eve of the so-called 21st century, in the wake of the high school massacre in Colorado, President Clinton proposes felony prosecutions against parents who allow their children to have guns that end up causing death or injury.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 19, 2014
Adam Lanza's father has broken his silence and, as we did in the immediate aftermath of the Newtown school shootings, we misunderstand. Peter Lanza reached out to author Andrew Solomon of The New Yorker at the first anniversary of the day when his 20-year-old son shot his mother, six teachers, 20 little kids and himself. They spent the next six months talking as the exacting Mr. Lanza clicked through the timeline of Adam's life, trying to understand what had happened. In the end, the father was no more successful than any of the experts who tried to explain the inexplicable.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lafave | April 27, 1999
"The sleep of reason produces monsters," -- Spanish painter Francisco de GoyaTHE MONSTERS who slaughtered more than a dozen classmates and a teacher in Littleton, Colo., a week ago were the products of a culture in which reason has been comatose for a very long time.The killers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, were raised in a society in which rules and standards are in such constant flux as to be non-existent. Morals are a matter of spin, values a matter of choice, and violence is glorified in movies and music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | April 12, 2009
Columbine By Dave Cullen Twelve / 420 pages / $26.99 Forget everything you thought you knew. The girl who professed her faith in God before being gunned down in the library. The Trenchcoat Mafia and the feud between the goths and jocks. The idea that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold - the two Columbine High School seniors who, on April 20, 1999, killed 12 of their fellow students and one teacher in what was, at the time, the worst school shooting in the history of the United States - were disaffected, unpopular and motivated by resentment or revenge.
NEWS
By NICHOLAS RICCARDI and NICHOLAS RICCARDI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2006
GOLDEN, Colo. -- Sheriff's officials released yesterday the last batch of documents from their investigation of the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School, a trove that included one killer's essays about guns in high schools and a diary kept by his father that dismisses complaints against his son from another classmate. With 25,000 pages of Columbine-related documents already in the public domain, yesterday's 946-page coda offered little new information. But it did provide additional details about Eric Harris' and Dylan Klebold's plotting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | April 12, 2009
Columbine By Dave Cullen Twelve / 420 pages / $26.99 Forget everything you thought you knew. The girl who professed her faith in God before being gunned down in the library. The Trenchcoat Mafia and the feud between the goths and jocks. The idea that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold - the two Columbine High School seniors who, on April 20, 1999, killed 12 of their fellow students and one teacher in what was, at the time, the worst school shooting in the history of the United States - were disaffected, unpopular and motivated by resentment or revenge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 1999
DENVER -- The family of one of the 12 students killed in the Columbine High School shootings in nearby Littleton last month filed a $250 million lawsuit here Thursday against the parents of the two young gunmen.Michael and Vonda Shoels, the parents of Isaiah Shoels, an 18-year-old senior who was killed in the shootings on April 20, announced the lawsuit at a news conference here. They said they were suing to hold the parents accountable for their children's actions and to help make sure other parents were more responsible.
NEWS
By Sidney Zion | May 2, 1999
IN THE beginning, Cain slew Abel. So how come God didn't punish Adam and Eve? They had eaten the forbidden fruit and should have known that Cain had a serious case of sibling rivalry that might easily develop into fratricide. But the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, gave the first parents a pass, despite their obvious retreat into denial. Now, on the eve of the so-called 21st century, in the wake of the high school massacre in Colorado, President Clinton proposes felony prosecutions against parents who allow their children to have guns that end up causing death or injury.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lafave | April 27, 1999
"The sleep of reason produces monsters," -- Spanish painter Francisco de GoyaTHE MONSTERS who slaughtered more than a dozen classmates and a teacher in Littleton, Colo., a week ago were the products of a culture in which reason has been comatose for a very long time.The killers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, were raised in a society in which rules and standards are in such constant flux as to be non-existent. Morals are a matter of spin, values a matter of choice, and violence is glorified in movies and music.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 1999
LITTLETON, Colo. -- Four days before the shootings, the principal of Columbine High School, Frank DeAngelis, told his students at an emotional pep rally in the gym that he did not want to bury another young person. With the prom set for the next night, Saturday, he implored them not to drink, or drink and drive, or put themselves at risk in any way."I do not want to attend another memorial service," he had said, recalling students who had died in car accidents, including a baseball player he had coached and two girlfriends of his teen-age daughter.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 2, 1999
DENVER -- As 8,000 anti-gun demonstrators -- rallied by the anguished pleas of the father of a slain Columbine High School student -- marched in protest, the National Rifle Association held a scaled-back meeting here yesterday.But although the group's members were outnumbered nearly 4-to-1 by the protesters, the mood among NRA members meeting in a basement ballroom was exuberantly defiant."Each horrible act can't become an ax for opportunists to cleave the very Bill of Rights that binds us," NRA President Charlton Heston told a cheering overflow crowd, many wearing blue-and-silver Columbine memorial ribbons fastened with NRA buttons.
NEWS
April 24, 1999
NEW PIECES keep turning up in Colorado, but the puzzle is still scrambled.Could Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold have transported so much ammunition, including two propane-tank bombs, without help? How did their bomb-making in a garage go unnoticed?And a larger question: Are adults capable of detecting true danger in teen-agers?The staff at Columbine High missed ominous signals that did not go unnoticed by the killers' peers, including a video depicting a massacre the suspects are said to have produced for a class project.
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