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NEWS
February 8, 2004
On February 5, 2004, C. WILLIAM "BILL" DYE, beloved husband of Mary Margaret Dye (nee Duck); devoted father of Laura Zavodny and her husband Jerry, Lynne Gryctz, William Dye and his wife Michelle, and Cheryl Marston; loving stepfather of Donald V. White, III, Richard White and his wife Dana, and Deborah Pettis and her husband Rob; loving brother of Pat Cobb, Irene Smith, and the late Doreen Waterman; dear grandfather of Danica and Dara Zavodny, Erica and...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Louis J. "Jack" Foudos, former owner of a cleaning and dyeing concern who played a pivotal role in the founding of St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in Parkville, died May 21 of complications from cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 77. The son of Louis Foudos, a Greek immigrant businessman, and Caroline Smith, a homemaker, Louis John Foudos was born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville. He attended McDonogh School and graduated in 1955 from Calvert Hall College High School.
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NEWS
March 6, 2004
On March 4, 2004, DORIS MARIE (nee Gilbert); beloved wife of the late Mack D. Dye; devoted mother of James D., Larry A., and Darryl G. Dye. Also survived by six grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, one brother and five sisters. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the family owned MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 3204 Mountain Road (Pasadena) on Saturday and Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where a Funeral Service will be held on Monday at 11 A.M. Interment Glen Haven Memorial Park Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
A stream flowing through Wyman Park turned bright pink, then lime green Thursday as city crews attempted to pinpoint with dye a break in a sewage pipe that officials estimate has spilled tens of thousands of gallons of untreated human waste into the tributary of the Jones Falls. The Public Works Department sent crews to check out Stony Run near 39th Street shortly after a suspected sewage leak was reported about 10:30 a.m., said department spokesman Kurt Kocher. As part of their investigation, they put a red dye into the sewer line to help them spot the leak.
SPORTS
By STAN RAPPAPORT and STAN RAPPAPORT,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Her GPA is 3.95 (out of 4.0).Her SAT score is 1,430 (out of 1,600).Those are Ginny Dye's most important statistics."She's always been at the top of the class," said Antoinette Bwalya, who has been on the Oakland Mills varsity soccer team with Dye for four years. "She realizes how important grades are and tells the young ones that education comes before soccer."Dye realized that a few years back while thinking about college. She thought that good grades would make it hard for colleges to tell her no. It would give the decision to her. She was right.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Baltimore residents and visitors "may notice a bright green liquid flowing through the Inner Harbor and other waterways" Wednesday, but they shouldn't be alarmed, city public works officials said Tuesday. The liquid is a non-toxic dye the department plans to inject into the city's aging sanitation system as part of a large-scale test to determine where leaks are occurring, the department said in a news release. The approach will help the public works department "to cost-effectively target critical repairs to the system," the department said.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Sun Staff Writer | November 13, 1994
All day it was the Oakland Mills offense pounding the ball right at a stubborn Hereford defense that was game to the task in the Class 1A-2A state semifinals.It took the Scorpions one complete half and a good portion of the second before they solved the Bulls' defense to came away away with a 1-0 victory yesterday afternoon at Liberty High.The goal that assured Oakland Mills (12-4-1) a meeting with Fallston in the state finals Friday at North County High happened innocently enough.Junior Ginny Dye broke free along the right side with just under 16 minutes left and sent a chip at a tough angle that went by Hereford goalie Kate MacFarlane into the upper far post.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Ginny Dye, a two-time All-Metro and all-state soccer player who helped Oakland Mills to state titles her freshman and senior seasons, will attend Davidson (N.C.) College in the fall."I'm a little bit nervous. It's so definite," said Dye, who will receive a partial scholarship. "I definitely think I'll be happy there."Davidson, 11-9-2 last season and the winner of the Southern Conference tournament the last two years, will graduate its two all-time leading scorers this year.Scoring goals and setting up teammates is what Dye does best.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1996
ATLANTA -- There are two ways to look at the performances of rookies Jermaine Dye and Andruw Jones for the Atlanta Braves in last night's 15-0 demolition of the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 7 of the National League Championship Series.Either they're a big part of the team's future, or last night was an interesting way to showcase their talents as trade bait. After what they did against the Cardinals, look for Dye and Jones to be here for a while.They each had singles in the Braves' six-run first inning that put the champagne, if not the game, on ice. Jones, the 19-year-old from Curacao, had his first three hits of the postseason, including a monster two-run homerin the sixth.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Baltimore residents and visitors "may notice a bright green liquid flowing through the Inner Harbor and other waterways" Wednesday, but they shouldn't be alarmed, city public works officials said Tuesday. The liquid is a non-toxic dye the department plans to inject into the city's aging sanitation system as part of a large-scale test to determine where leaks are occurring, the department said in a news release. The approach will help the public works department "to cost-effectively target critical repairs to the system," the department said.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | November 16, 2009
Question: : I've been using a Grecian Formula for my graying hair for years. It has lead acetate in it. I checked the Food and Drug Administration Web site. They say they tested it and approved it. The lead has me a bit concerned. Any thoughts? Answer: : The FDA does no testing of its own but did approve lead acetate as a "progressive" hair dye. That means it gradually darkens hair with repeated use. The FDA concluded in 2002 that according to safety tests it received, "No significant increase in blood levels of lead was seen in the trial subjects and the lead was not shown to be absorbed into the body through such use."
FEATURES
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | July 17, 2008
Almost 40 years ago, artificial food dyes had their moment in the sun. In 1969, Soviet scientists announced that Red Dye #2 caused cancer in rats. Seven years later, the Food and Drug Administration agreed, and banned the ubiquitous coloring from U.S. food - creating a cultural icon for a generation that used "Red Dye #2" as shorthand for anything toxic. Now, synthetic dyes are getting a second run. New research indicates the chemicals can disrupt some children's behavior, and activists and consumer groups are asking for bans or limits on the dyes.
FEATURES
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | June 5, 2008
Spurred on by a successful revolt against artificial food dyes in the United Kingdom, a prominent U.S. food safety advocacy group Tuesday called on federal regulators to ban several colorings, claiming they're linked to hyperactivity in children. Although it may be a long shot - the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rejected such claims - food safety advocates say they hope that by putting a spotlight on the issue, producers will voluntarily drop artificial colors. That's what has been happening in the U.K., as industry giants such as Kraft Foods and Mars have reacted to increasing consumer worries over artificial colors, particularly after a British study bolstered the hyperactivity theory.
SPORTS
June 1, 2008
Straight Shooters answers your youth lacrosse questions with the help of US Lacrosse experts. This week's "Straight Shooter" is Matt Zash. Zash was a two-time All-America midfielder at Duke, graduating in 2006. He plays professional lacrosse for the Major Lacrosse League's Philadelphia Barrage and the National Lacrosse League's New York Titans. Zash was a member of the 2003 United States under-19 men's world championship team and played for Team USA in the 2007 Indoor World Lacrosse Championships in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
NEWS
By DeeDee Correll and DeeDee Correll,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 2008
BOULDER, Colo. -- This is a sight no self-respecting hair stylist wants to see: An inch of white roots showing, the remaining color dulling to a lackluster shade. "It is faded, isn't it?" said Joy Douglas, owner of Zing Salon, running her fingers through her toy poodle Cici's once-pink tight curls. Nearly a month has passed since Cici had her bimonthly treatment of pureed organic beets and egg whites massaged into her white coat while she basked in the glow of a heat lamp. With her coat dyed pink - sometimes a bubble-gum pink, other times a vivid magenta - Douglas, 33, says Cici is a wriggling, little 10-pound advertisement for breast cancer awareness, an issue dear to Douglas' heart.
FEATURES
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | March 22, 2008
If you want to go natural when dyeing eggs this Easter, browse your refrigerator and spice cabinet for dyes from plants. That's how peasants in medieval Europe used to color eggs. Simmer the spices or plant matter in water until you have a strong color; then add a couple of tablespoons of vinegar and clean, hard-boiled eggs. It may take several hours of soaking in the refrigerator to get a satisfying color, and tints still will tend to be pastel. For deeper tints, you can simmer the eggs in the dye solution, but don't plan to eat those eggs.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 1, 2007
The rise of digital photography spelled doom for the old-fashioned instant film cameras from Polaroid Corp. But now a team of Polaroid veterans plans to make digital cameras more like classic Polaroids, with a device that fits in a shirt pocket and prints digital snapshots in seconds, without using ink. "It's going to go places where no printer has gone before," said Wendy Caswell, president and chief executive of Zink Imaging LLC. Zink unveiled its...
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