Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDwight Yoakam
IN THE NEWS

Dwight Yoakam

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2006
Dwight Yoakam Country singer Dwight Yoakam performs at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington, on Wednesday. Tickets are $35, and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. For details, call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2006
Dwight Yoakam Country singer Dwight Yoakam performs at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington, on Wednesday. Tickets are $35, and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. For details, call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 26, 1993
THIS TIMEDwight Yoakam (Reprise 45241)As a singer, Dwight Yoakam has everything you'd expect of a country traditionalist -- a high, lonesome tenor with a soul-deep twang. As a songwriter and stylist, however, Yoakam's sense of tradition is anything but the Nashville norm, because instead of acting as if rock and country have nothing in common, Yoakam treats the two as different branches of the same tree. So "This Time" makes no distinction between the hillbilly heartbreak of "Home for Sale" or the classic honky-tonk of the title tune, and the Stones-style stomp of "Wild Ride."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2000
Kid Rock The History of Rock (Lava/Atlantic 83314) The funniest thing about Kid Rock's "The History of Rock" is its title. Because what we get on this CD isn't a look back at where Rock has been, but a collection of remakes that recasts his old songs in terms of his current sound. As revisionist history goes, not even the Soviets could have done better. It's not hard to see how Rock arrived at such a decision. When he started making records, way back in 1990, he was a straight-up hip-hop artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 26, 1995
BIZARRE FRUITM People (Epic 67037)Too often, the singing on dance records seems almost an afterthought, something mixed in at the last minute to give the groove a little extra flavor. M People, on the other hand, come across like a soul group that just happens to have a flair for hard-core club beats. Consequently, "Bizarre Fruit" is one of the rarest of all pop pleasures, an album that's as listenable as it is danceable. Although deep-voiced Heather Small has all the power and presence expected of a house music diva, she avoids the vocal histrionics that make so many of the species unbearable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine Country Reba McEntire | June 11, 1998
Dwight YoakamLong Way Home (Reprise 46918)Despite his considerable skills as an actor, Dwight Yoakam is hardly the sort anyone would cast as a country music radical. If anything, he seems quite the opposite, having come up as a dedicated, dyed-in-the-wool traditionalist, a singer who could easily have passed for his generation's Buck Owens.In a weird way, though, it's Yoakam's devotion to country music's past that ends up making him seem too radical. Because unlike much of the music made in today's Nashville, which uses contemporary pop polish to make country music seem as consistent and dependable as any fast-food burger, the down-home sound Yoakam delivers on "Long Way Home" is as tangy and distinctive as grits in gravy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2000
Kid Rock The History of Rock (Lava/Atlantic 83314) The funniest thing about Kid Rock's "The History of Rock" is its title. Because what we get on this CD isn't a look back at where Rock has been, but a collection of remakes that recasts his old songs in terms of his current sound. As revisionist history goes, not even the Soviets could have done better. It's not hard to see how Rock arrived at such a decision. When he started making records, way back in 1990, he was a straight-up hip-hop artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine | November 2, 1995
GoneDwight Yoakam (Reprise 46051)It used to be that the stylistic boundaries of country music were as well-defined (and hard to change) as the Nashville city limits. That's not the case with the current generation of country stars, though, and few have articulated that change as completely as Dwight Yoakam does on "Gone." It helps, of course, that he covers a lot of ground on the album, moving effortlessly from the Marty Robbins-style Mexican brass of "Sorry You Asked?" to the Sir Douglas stomp of "Gone (That'll Be Me)"
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 24, 1992
These days, there's a lot of talk in the music business about the people who have helped make country music more popular than it has been in years. Some will point to Randy Travis, and the way his singles revitalized the unvarnished sincerity of country singing; others will applaud Dwight Yoakam for making hillbilly music hip again. And of course, everyone will mention Garth Brooks, who almost single-handedly proved that a country fTC artist could have a pop-star-sized audience.But if you want to know the truth, there's nothing any of them have done that can compare to the revolution wrought by Roy Acuff.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
FAIR HILL -- For many people, last year's Fair Hill Country Music Festival in rural Cecil County was like a sappy country song that might go something like this:"I got stuck in the mud in my pickup truck, and my temper overheated in a traffic jam as tight as Dwight Yoakam's jeans."Last year's festival, the first in the rolling horse country of rural Cecil, is still a sore spot with organizers.Heavy rain the night before, limited access to the site and the attraction of the Judds' farewell tour combined to create maddening, miles-long traffic jams, muddy parking areas and lots of fans with achy-breaky hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine Country Reba McEntire | June 11, 1998
Dwight YoakamLong Way Home (Reprise 46918)Despite his considerable skills as an actor, Dwight Yoakam is hardly the sort anyone would cast as a country music radical. If anything, he seems quite the opposite, having come up as a dedicated, dyed-in-the-wool traditionalist, a singer who could easily have passed for his generation's Buck Owens.In a weird way, though, it's Yoakam's devotion to country music's past that ends up making him seem too radical. Because unlike much of the music made in today's Nashville, which uses contemporary pop polish to make country music seem as consistent and dependable as any fast-food burger, the down-home sound Yoakam delivers on "Long Way Home" is as tangy and distinctive as grits in gravy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine | November 2, 1995
GoneDwight Yoakam (Reprise 46051)It used to be that the stylistic boundaries of country music were as well-defined (and hard to change) as the Nashville city limits. That's not the case with the current generation of country stars, though, and few have articulated that change as completely as Dwight Yoakam does on "Gone." It helps, of course, that he covers a lot of ground on the album, moving effortlessly from the Marty Robbins-style Mexican brass of "Sorry You Asked?" to the Sir Douglas stomp of "Gone (That'll Be Me)"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 26, 1995
BIZARRE FRUITM People (Epic 67037)Too often, the singing on dance records seems almost an afterthought, something mixed in at the last minute to give the groove a little extra flavor. M People, on the other hand, come across like a soul group that just happens to have a flair for hard-core club beats. Consequently, "Bizarre Fruit" is one of the rarest of all pop pleasures, an album that's as listenable as it is danceable. Although deep-voiced Heather Small has all the power and presence expected of a house music diva, she avoids the vocal histrionics that make so many of the species unbearable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 26, 1993
THIS TIMEDwight Yoakam (Reprise 45241)As a singer, Dwight Yoakam has everything you'd expect of a country traditionalist -- a high, lonesome tenor with a soul-deep twang. As a songwriter and stylist, however, Yoakam's sense of tradition is anything but the Nashville norm, because instead of acting as if rock and country have nothing in common, Yoakam treats the two as different branches of the same tree. So "This Time" makes no distinction between the hillbilly heartbreak of "Home for Sale" or the classic honky-tonk of the title tune, and the Stones-style stomp of "Wild Ride."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 24, 1992
These days, there's a lot of talk in the music business about the people who have helped make country music more popular than it has been in years. Some will point to Randy Travis, and the way his singles revitalized the unvarnished sincerity of country singing; others will applaud Dwight Yoakam for making hillbilly music hip again. And of course, everyone will mention Garth Brooks, who almost single-handedly proved that a country fTC artist could have a pop-star-sized audience.But if you want to know the truth, there's nothing any of them have done that can compare to the revolution wrought by Roy Acuff.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
FAIR HILL -- For many people, last year's Fair Hill Country Music Festival in rural Cecil County was like a sappy country song that might go something like this:"I got stuck in the mud in my pickup truck, and my temper overheated in a traffic jam as tight as Dwight Yoakam's jeans."Last year's festival, the first in the rolling horse country of rural Cecil, is still a sore spot with organizers.Heavy rain the night before, limited access to the site and the attraction of the Judds' farewell tour combined to create maddening, miles-long traffic jams, muddy parking areas and lots of fans with achy-breaky hearts.
FEATURES
January 7, 1994
Here are selected nominations for the 36th annual Grammy Awards:* Record of the Year: "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)," Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle, producer Walter Afanasieff; "I Will Always Love You," Whitney Houston, producer David Foster; "The River of Dreams," Billy Joel, producers Dan Kortchmar and Joe Nicolo; "If I Ever Lose My Faith in You," Sting, producers Hugh Padgham and Sting; "Harvest Moon," Neil Young, producers Neil Young and Ben...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | April 11, 2002
Just announced Jah Works, along with the All Mighty Senators, performs at the Recher Theatre in Towson May 4. Call 410-337-7210. Rachelle Ferrell and Rahsaan Patterson will perform at the Warner Theatre in Washington May 25. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. today. Call 410-481-SEAT. Brooks & Dunn's "Neon Circus & Wild West Show" comes to Nissan Pavilion in Manassas, Va., June 8. Also performing: Dwight Yoakam, Gary Allan, Chris Cagle and Trick Pony. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. tomorrow.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.