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NEWS
September 18, 2012
Apparently, Gov. Martin O'Malley has three bosses: President Barack Obama, his own political aspirations and the citizens of Maryland ("O'Malley pays a visit to Iowa's core Democrats," Sept. 17). Sadly, they are listed in the exact order of his priorities. John R. Hussar Jr., Bel Air
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
A Baltimore police officer who authorities say shot a man who attacked him in Middle River last month has been cleared of wrongdoing, Baltimore County police said Thursday. The officer was justified in his actions during the Sept. 20 incident on Red Rose Farm Road, State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger's office said. The officer was identified as Officer Michael Nolan-Anderson by the city police department and by Shellenberger's office. County police say Nolan-Anderson had gotten off work and was driving about 12:30 a.m. when one of two intoxicated men "somehow damaged the mirror on his vehicle.
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EXPLORE
September 8, 2011
Marine Col. Susan B. Seaman , of Columbia, assumed duties as commanding officer for Marine Corps Forces Command Headquarters and Service Battalion from Lt. Col. Anthony A. Ference during a change of command ceremony attended by more than 100 Marines, Sailors and family members on Aug. 25, at Camp Allen. Seaman was transferred to Norfolk, Va., from Headquarters and Support Battalion, in Camp Lejeune, N.C., where she served as the commanding officer over the last couple of years.
NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Two new synthetic turf fields unveiled this week at Kinder Farm Park will transform the Millersvillle facility into the new home of Severna Park High School athletics - at least for the foreseeable future. Community leaders, school officials and student athletes gathered at the complex Monday to dedicate the fields, which along with four additional grass surfaces will accommodate many of the Falcons' fall and spring sports teams while construction is underway on the new Severna Park High School.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
I am responding to a letter to the editor("Social Security employees deserve a pay cut or two. " March 9). I have been employed by the Social Security Administration for the past several years. Prior to that, I spent over 15 years in private industry. In both sectors I have witnessed employees who do not do their fair share of work. However, the vast majority of individuals at SSA are hard working folks who take pride in their role of public servants and know that the work they do helps make a difference in the lives of millions of Americans.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 22, 1993
In a move that is expected to help Black & Decker Corp. fend off Japanese competitors, the U.S. Commerce Department has increased temporary duties on professional power saws, sanders and grinding tools made in Japan.The new duties came after a complaint filed by the Towson-based power tool and appliance maker against its primary nemesis, Makita Corp., and other Japanese companies. The complaint, filed last June, alleged that Japanese power tool makers were selling products in this country below their fair market values, a practice known as dumping.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | May 28, 1991
Frank Robinson is supposed to meet today with club president Larry Lucchino and general manager Roland Hemond in an effort to outline his new front-office duties with the Orioles.The ex-manager also has indicated he would talk to the media after the meeting.Robinson, who was relieved of his managerial duties last Thursday, has a "rollover" contract that guarantees him a front-office position. The specific nature of his duties, however, has not been spelled out, although it is believed to include evaluation of talent at both the major- and minor-league levels.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2004
The Carroll County Health Department is about to lend one of its departmental leaders to the military. Edwin Singer, 39, director of the Health Department's environmental health division and a major in the Army Reserve, has been called to active duty and is to serve a year in Afghanistan. Friday will be his last day at his Westminster office. "It is no fun going to a combat zone in a Third World country that has been at war for decades," he said. "This is a tough area of the world, and the living conditions will be lousy.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2004
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Furniture retailers are bracing for sharp increases in the price of bedroom furniture, with the Commerce Department expected to impose duties today in reaction to alleged dumping by Chinese manufacturers. The move comes after months of lobbying by some U.S. furniture makers, who contend that the Chinese dumped $1.4 billion in wooden bedroom furniture in the United States in 2003. Retailers and other U.S. furniture makers who have manufacturing operations in China are opposed to duties.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Commerce Department lowered tariffs on $1.7 billion worth of shrimp imports from Thailand, India, Ecuador and Brazil yesterday, potentially lowering prices for America's most popular seafood. Thailand, the largest exporter of shrimp to the United States, faces average duties of as much as 6 percent, down from a 10.3 percent preliminary tariff proposed in July after the United States determined that Thai companies were illegally "dumping" exports at below-market prices.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
At every stop in his young football career, undrafted rookie James Hurst hasn't had much time to settle in before being thrust into a starting role. In both high school and college, it turned out he was ready the moment he walked onto the field, and the Ravens are hoping the same proves true on Sunday when he starts in place of left tackle Eugene Monroe, who underwent knee surgery on Wednesday. "I'm going to use that [knowledge] for confidence and understanding that sure, this is a bigger stage and it's a completely different opportunity, but at the same time, the experience is similar, being a young guy and being thrust in there in a position where you're playing a really good team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The past 10 months have been a long wait for Johns Hopkins , which lost 29-24 to Wesley in the first round of the NCAA Division III playoffs on Nov. 23. Brandon Cherry said every member of the Blue Jays has been chomping at the bit for the start of the upcoming 2014 season, which kicks off on Saturday at noon with a home game against Randolph Macon at Homewood Field. “Everybody's just excited to get back on the field,” the junior running back said. “It's been a while since our last loss to Wesley, and we're putting that behind us. We're coming in with the fresh mind that it's a new season and we're ready to get back in it.” The new season means a featured tailback role for the Parkville resident and Boys' Latin graduate.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Marylanders planning to travel to Ocean City for the Labor Day holiday need to be aware of the potential for dangerous rip currents because of tropical storm Cristobal, which continues to churn far out in the Atlantic. So far this summer Ocean City has seen a number of deaths related to rip currents, including an 18-year-old from Virginia who drowned Tuesday, leading town officials to post swimming restrictions that could last into the weekend. In an interview in July, Capt.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A veteran Baltimore County police officer was suspended this week and faces several criminal charges after the department said he tried to break into a Dundalk home in search of drugs. Officer Joseph Stanley Harden, 31, of Towson told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. He was charged late Thursday with attempted burglary, drug possession, attempted robbery and malicious destruction of property. The department said he has been suspended without pay. His police powers also have been suspended.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
Peter Sundman, the chief executive officer of ClearBridge Advisors, has left Legg Mason's largest stock-fund division based in New York, the Baltimore company said Friday. In a letter to clients on Dec. 1, ClearBridge said Sundman's duties have been merged with those of the president, Terrence Murphy. Legg spokeswoman Mary Athridge said the roles of chief executive and president had overlapping responsibilities that could be combined for efficiency. Sundman joined ClearBridge in December 2008.
BUSINESS
By Mark Drajem and Mark Drajem,BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 15, 2004
The U.S. housing industry appealed to the Bush administration last week to drop tariffs on Mexican cement, saying those duties of 81 percent are causing a shortage of the building material that could undermine the U.S. housing market. Forty-one percent of builders reported a shortage of cement compared with 11 percent in May, according to a survey by the National Association of Home Builders. The short supply of cement, steel framing, insulation and other materials is adding as much as $7,000 to the cost of a new home and leading to construction delays, the group said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore native Joey Odoms, who returned this summer from duty in Afghanistan as a member of the Maryland Army National Guard, will be the next national anthem singer for the Ravens. He was selected from among eight finalists who sang "The Star-Spangled Banner" before a jury last week at M&T Bank Stadium. "I'm pretty excited," said Odoms, 25, a songwriter and former 911 operator who grew up in Reservoir Hill and did some acting on HBO's "The Wire. " Meg Sippey, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's artistic planning manager, was among the judges.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
About eight years ago, a local business executive asked Colt Bracken, a Baltimore County police detective, if he'd be interested in working a second job as a personal driver. Bracken jumped at the opportunity and since then has turned the venture - mainly through word of mouth - into a growing business, he said. His company, Security Dawgs, now employs more than a dozen off-duty and retired law enforcement officers from around the region as part-time drivers and to provide security.
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