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By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 1998
I've never been to Holland, but I've always imagined it to be pretty gray and chilly. Maybe that's why I reach for my Dutch oven so often when it rains, which has been happening a lot lately.Dutch ovens, of course, are large covered pots, usually made of cast iron. The originals had little legs so they could be placed in coals where they could be used just like ... ovens. That's probably why they're not called Dutch pots.Why are they called Dutch ovens? I have no idea, and even the experts are perplexed.
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By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
WYE ISLAND-- --Directionally, Fran Gower's pineapple upside-down cake is a success. Aesthetically, however, it's four rings shy of dessert. Not to worry, says Gower, as she scurries around the campfire from the Dutch oven to her portable pantry sitting near a stump. With a quick twist of a can opener and a few pokes with a fork, Gower replaces the charred pineapple rings with unblemished ones. If the 11 guests at her camp site - fresh from a kayaking trip - know about the touch-up job, they never let on. And that, says Gower with a smile, is what camp cooking is all about.
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By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
WYE ISLAND-- --Directionally, Fran Gower's pineapple upside-down cake is a success. Aesthetically, however, it's four rings shy of dessert. Not to worry, says Gower, as she scurries around the campfire from the Dutch oven to her portable pantry sitting near a stump. With a quick twist of a can opener and a few pokes with a fork, Gower replaces the charred pineapple rings with unblemished ones. If the 11 guests at her camp site - fresh from a kayaking trip - know about the touch-up job, they never let on. And that, says Gower with a smile, is what camp cooking is all about.
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By SANDRA PINCKNEY and SANDRA PINCKNEY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2006
The first time I tasted Beef Daube, I was shooting a segment on French foods for Food Finds, the show I host on the Food Network. The daube (pronounced dobe) arrived frozen from a California gourmet market. There was no time for gentle defrosting. The production assistant simply scraped some into a bowl and zapped it in the microwave for me to eat on camera. Even under these crude conditions, I could tell this was no ordinary beef stew. The taste was amazing - the flavors more intense, the meat more tender.
FEATURES
June 1, 1994
Q: I have always loved seven-minute frosting that's made with sugar syrup and whipped egg whites, but I worry these days, with all the talk of salmonella, about whether it's safe?A: This recipe should be safe from any chance of salmonella if you are careful to follow precise steps. First, make sure the sugar syrup reaches 240 degrees and is still boiling as you are pouring it into the beaten egg whites. Salmonella is killed at temperatures of 160 degrees and over, so you may want to also use a thermometer to test the hottest temperature of the icing as the syrup is being poured in. Also, look for pasteurized egg whites in your supermarket, which would eliminate the potential problem.
FEATURES
January 16, 1991
Family dinner are back in style, especially on the weekend when there's more time to linger in the kitchen. A family dinner calls for something special -- not necessarily fancy, just good.Braised veal brisket with dried fruit fits the bill. Brisket requires the slow moist heat cooking of braising to ensure that it's fork tender. Braising in the oven means that its' practically fuss free, so there's plenty of time for the cook to spend with family and friends.A veal brisket typically weighs between two and 2 1/2 pounds enough to serve six. Parsnips and carrots, dried apricots and prunes cook alongside the brisket during the last half hour, providing a delicious and colorful accompaniment for the veal.
FEATURES
April 3, 1991
Country Herbed Chicken is made with fresh vegetables, wine and seasonings. The chicken can be served with hot cooked red potatoes, if desired.Country Herbed Chicken2 tablespoons vegetable oil1 2 1/2 - to 3-pound broiler-fryer chicken, cut up2 10 3/4 -ounce cans condensed creamy chicken mushroom or cream of chicken soup1/2 cup dry white wine2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves, crushed1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary leaves, crushed1/2...
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By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 2005
Canned tomatoes and frozen sliced okra offer shortcuts to success by adding a colorful flavor boost to this comfort soup. Using a between-season lineup of vegetables available now in the produce section, this hearty dinner satisfies while we await spring vegetables. Substitute tilapia or red snapper fillets if you don't have a taste for catfish, and call it seafood soup. Tip Buy shredded cabbage from the supermarket to save chopping time. Catfish Soup Preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes Makes 8 servings 4 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 each, quartered: small red onion, ribs celery 1 carrot, quartered 2 cloves garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each)
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By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 9, 1991
Try these recipes for more healthful versions of traditional soul food.Oven-Fried Okra1 1/4 cups cornmealPepper to taste1 3/4 pounds fresh okra, washed, drained, tips and stems removed, cut into 1/2 -inch slicesVegetable cooking sprayPreheat oven to 450. In a medium mixing bowl, combine cornmeal and pepper. Dredge okra in cornmeal mixture. (Okra must be moistened, from washing, for cornmeal mixture to coat well.) Lightly coat a 15x10x1-inch jellyroll pan with cooking spray. Spread okra in a single layer in pan. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until crisp, stirring occasionally.
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By Joanne Lamb Hayes and Joanne Lamb Hayes,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | September 20, 2000
Seventeenth-century Europe was embroiled in political and religious turmoil - no place for peaceful farmers who loved good food. As farms burned and heads rolled in the Palatine, German Protestants accepted William Penn's invitation to settle and develop the central woodlands of his American grant, Pennsylvania. Group by group, Mennonites, Amish, Seventh-Day Baptists, Dunkers, Schwenkfelders and Moravians packed their cookbooks and their families and came to the New World. Spreading out over what is now Northampton, Berks, Lancaster, Lehigh, Lebanon, York and Adams counties, they tidied up the countryside, built stone houses like those they had left, planted vegetables and started cooking, adding local products as they discovered them - corn, sweet potatoes, squash and beans - to their traditional recipes.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 2005
Canned tomatoes and frozen sliced okra offer shortcuts to success by adding a colorful flavor boost to this comfort soup. Using a between-season lineup of vegetables available now in the produce section, this hearty dinner satisfies while we await spring vegetables. Substitute tilapia or red snapper fillets if you don't have a taste for catfish, and call it seafood soup. Tip Buy shredded cabbage from the supermarket to save chopping time. Catfish Soup Preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes Makes 8 servings 4 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 each, quartered: small red onion, ribs celery 1 carrot, quartered 2 cloves garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each)
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
Release your inner Girl Scout: Forget the oven, abandon the microwave, and get ready to make dinner in the fireplace. Sound like fun? Then William Rubel's The Magic of Fire: Hearth Cooking (Ten Speed Press, 2002, $40) is the cookbook for you. The 296-page tome is advertised as the definitive guide to open-hearth cooking, and by all that is holy in Colonial Williamsburg, one is inclined to believe it. Not only does the book include 100 recipes suitable for fireplace or campfire, but the author also goes into considerable detail about equipment, methods and even how your fireplace should work.
FEATURES
By Joanne Lamb Hayes and Joanne Lamb Hayes,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | September 20, 2000
Seventeenth-century Europe was embroiled in political and religious turmoil - no place for peaceful farmers who loved good food. As farms burned and heads rolled in the Palatine, German Protestants accepted William Penn's invitation to settle and develop the central woodlands of his American grant, Pennsylvania. Group by group, Mennonites, Amish, Seventh-Day Baptists, Dunkers, Schwenkfelders and Moravians packed their cookbooks and their families and came to the New World. Spreading out over what is now Northampton, Berks, Lancaster, Lehigh, Lebanon, York and Adams counties, they tidied up the countryside, built stone houses like those they had left, planted vegetables and started cooking, adding local products as they discovered them - corn, sweet potatoes, squash and beans - to their traditional recipes.
FEATURES
By Kitty Morse and Kitty Morse,los angeles times syndicate | January 6, 1999
Moroccan cooks rely on relatively few implements to create their exquisite dishes. Most women use a simple canoun (small charcoal brazier) as their only source of heat to boil water for mint tea or to slow-cook a savory tagine.They also have at their disposal an assortment of earthenware platters with distinctive conical lids, called tagine slaoui, for making tagines, as well as several aluminum colander-capped soup pots called keskess, for making couscous. For grinding spices, they have a brass mehraz, or mortar and pestle.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 1998
I've never been to Holland, but I've always imagined it to be pretty gray and chilly. Maybe that's why I reach for my Dutch oven so often when it rains, which has been happening a lot lately.Dutch ovens, of course, are large covered pots, usually made of cast iron. The originals had little legs so they could be placed in coals where they could be used just like ... ovens. That's probably why they're not called Dutch pots.Why are they called Dutch ovens? I have no idea, and even the experts are perplexed.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1995
Just in time for the holidays, here's a quick paella recipe that's perfect for the family or for entertaining friends. Read the recipe carefully first, so you understand the two processes: steaming and sauteing. One saute pan and one large Dutch oven -- both with lids -- are required here. The pan sizes are important for perfectly cooked ingredients.To accompany the paella, prepare a fresh green salad. Toss with a vinaigrette and some pitted black olives and toasted chopped almonds.For the sweet finish, try a purchased rich chocolate cake with chocolate frosting to which you've added a fruity garnish of overlapping half moon slices of oranges.
FEATURES
By Nancy E. Schaadt and Nancy E. Schaadt,Universal Press Syndicate | July 5, 1995
There are nearly as many ways to cook outdoors as there are to cook in your kitchen. But camp cooking needn't be fancy. For first-time campers, simplicity rules.Many campers bring wood or charcoal and cook over the coals using an iron skillet, a Dutch oven and foil.Make simple meals using simple tools. For starters, you will need seasoned wood or charcoal, long-handled grilling tools, an iron skillet, a Dutch oven, thick oven mitts, lots of heavy-duty foil plus an assortment of auxiliary items.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1995
Just in time for the holidays, here's a quick paella recipe that's perfect for the family or for entertaining friends. Read the recipe carefully first, so you understand the two processes: steaming and sauteing. One saute pan and one large Dutch oven -- both with lids -- are required here. The pan sizes are important for perfectly cooked ingredients.To accompany the paella, prepare a fresh green salad. Toss with a vinaigrette and some pitted black olives and toasted chopped almonds.For the sweet finish, try a purchased rich chocolate cake with chocolate frosting to which you've added a fruity garnish of overlapping half moon slices of oranges.
FEATURES
By Nancy E. Schaadt and Nancy E. Schaadt,Universal Press Syndicate | July 5, 1995
There are nearly as many ways to cook outdoors as there are to cook in your kitchen. But camp cooking needn't be fancy. For first-time campers, simplicity rules.Many campers bring wood or charcoal and cook over the coals using an iron skillet, a Dutch oven and foil.Make simple meals using simple tools. For starters, you will need seasoned wood or charcoal, long-handled grilling tools, an iron skillet, a Dutch oven, thick oven mitts, lots of heavy-duty foil plus an assortment of auxiliary items.
FEATURES
June 1, 1994
Q: I have always loved seven-minute frosting that's made with sugar syrup and whipped egg whites, but I worry these days, with all the talk of salmonella, about whether it's safe?A: This recipe should be safe from any chance of salmonella if you are careful to follow precise steps. First, make sure the sugar syrup reaches 240 degrees and is still boiling as you are pouring it into the beaten egg whites. Salmonella is killed at temperatures of 160 degrees and over, so you may want to also use a thermometer to test the hottest temperature of the icing as the syrup is being poured in. Also, look for pasteurized egg whites in your supermarket, which would eliminate the potential problem.
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