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Dutch Elm Disease

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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Once, the American elm was America's tree. Stately and sturdy, it lined the nation's avenues, adorned its parks and shaded its neighborhoods. Then Dutch elm disease struck.By the millions, the elms began to die. As the disease spread from state to state, thousands of communities witnessed the toll.Few battles were won against the disease. But there's hope on one front.Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found two new varieties of American elm that resist Dutch elm disease.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
As a child playing under its branches in the 1930s, Michael Jenkins Cromwell Jr. knew that the massive elm near his Baltimore County home was extraordinary. "It was the largest and oldest tree, going back to Revolutionary times," he said. Decades later, others would be charmed by the majestic tree. Soon after buying their house near Brooklandville, Charles and Anita Stapleton decided to contact state foresters to measure the tree in their backyard. That call set into motion a chain of events that led to their tree being recognized as the largest American elm in the nation.
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NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 22, 2004
Our neighborhood lost three large elm trees in the past few years, and we would like to replace them. What can you tell us about the liberty elm? Is it resistant to Dutch elm disease? My answer was gleaned from several sources, including the liberty elm Web site, www.libertyelm.com. If you would like more details, please visit the site. No American elm cultivar is considered immune to Dutch elm disease, but several cultivars are considered highly resistant. The three most notable are the liberty elm (Ulmus americana 'Liberty')
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | June 2, 2007
Which native plants attract Oriole birds? Can you give me a list? Their favorite nesting tree is American elm. You are in luck because elms resistant to Dutch elm disease are now available and grow fairly fast. Willows will also do. Orioles eat insects and fruits, including cherry, blueberry, blackberry, serviceberry, mulberry and grapes. Our native wild cherry trees abound; you needn't purchase a domestic tree. Orioles also feed on seed vegetables, such as corn, peas and beans. The birds' numbers have declined because of habitat loss and pesticides.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
Sixty years ago, a beetle-borne fungus arrived in the Unite States and began killing off Ulmus americana, the American elm.Dutch elm disease slowly destroyed the shady ambience of town squares, parks and college campuses. The infection wilted leaves, rotted limbs and eventually wiped out nearly 80 million trees.Now, scientists may have developed a solution. Researchers at the National Arboretum in Washington have created two varieties of elm tree that seem more resistant than any others to Ophiostoma ulmi, and thus may allow a comeback for the elm and the notably beautiful landscape it provides.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2000
DETROIT - The nation's largest American elm, located in a cornfield near Traverse City, Mich., is dying of Dutch elm disease, according to a leading plant scientist. Samples from the elm, which is estimated to be at least 300 years old, were tested and the Dutch elm disease confirmed by R. Jay Stipes, professor of plant pathology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University in Blacksburg, Va. The tree is known as the Buckley elm, named after the town south of Traverse City where it's located.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | June 2, 2007
Which native plants attract Oriole birds? Can you give me a list? Their favorite nesting tree is American elm. You are in luck because elms resistant to Dutch elm disease are now available and grow fairly fast. Willows will also do. Orioles eat insects and fruits, including cherry, blueberry, blackberry, serviceberry, mulberry and grapes. Our native wild cherry trees abound; you needn't purchase a domestic tree. Orioles also feed on seed vegetables, such as corn, peas and beans. The birds' numbers have declined because of habitat loss and pesticides.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
As a child playing under its branches in the 1930s, Michael Jenkins Cromwell Jr. knew that the massive elm near his Baltimore County home was extraordinary. "It was the largest and oldest tree, going back to Revolutionary times," he said. Decades later, others would be charmed by the majestic tree. Soon after buying their house near Brooklandville, Charles and Anita Stapleton decided to contact state foresters to measure the tree in their backyard. That call set into motion a chain of events that led to their tree being recognized as the largest American elm in the nation.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 20, 2002
We have a large American elm in our front yard that began dropping leaves in mid-September, and we are concerned that it may have Dutch elm disease. How can we tell? Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease that is spread from tree to tree by small beetles in the spring. Sometimes infected trees will decline very rapidly, but in other situations trees may live for months. There is no cure. Typically, the first symptom you see is flagging branches, on which all of the leaves have died, but they continue to hang on. If your tree has one or more flagging branches, you should be concerned, and I recommend that you call a certified arborist to inspect your tree.
NEWS
July 7, 1998
William D. Carey,82, a former Bureau of the Budget official who served under three presidents, died June 24 from chronic lung disease in Washington. He joined the Bureau of the Budget in 1942 and worked in the Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson administrations. He was the bureau's assistant director from 1966 to 1969.Harold Herthum,69, a character actor best known for his role as the doctor in "Forrest Gump," died Saturday in Baton Rouge, La. of a heart attack. He also was in "The Toy," "Tin Cup," "Blaze," "JFK," "Cobb" and "Solitude Point."
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 22, 2004
Our neighborhood lost three large elm trees in the past few years, and we would like to replace them. What can you tell us about the liberty elm? Is it resistant to Dutch elm disease? My answer was gleaned from several sources, including the liberty elm Web site, www.libertyelm.com. If you would like more details, please visit the site. No American elm cultivar is considered immune to Dutch elm disease, but several cultivars are considered highly resistant. The three most notable are the liberty elm (Ulmus americana 'Liberty')
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | July 20, 2003
We have a large shade tree in the front lawn that we think may be an American elm. Is this a rare tree now, and how can we tell if it is an elm? The American elm (Ulmus americana) was once a very common tree in the Eastern and Midwestern United States, but Dutch elm disease and other pest problems have killed many trees. This has made the tree somewhat rare and it is expected that many more trees will die. It is relatively easy to determine if you have an elm tree, but it can be difficult to determine whether it is an American elm or some other type of elm. First, take a look at the overall shape of the tree.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 20, 2002
We have a large American elm in our front yard that began dropping leaves in mid-September, and we are concerned that it may have Dutch elm disease. How can we tell? Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease that is spread from tree to tree by small beetles in the spring. Sometimes infected trees will decline very rapidly, but in other situations trees may live for months. There is no cure. Typically, the first symptom you see is flagging branches, on which all of the leaves have died, but they continue to hang on. If your tree has one or more flagging branches, you should be concerned, and I recommend that you call a certified arborist to inspect your tree.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | May 6, 2001
As we watch trees blossom and grow in the spring, it doesn't occur to us that some are sick, even dying. Years of drought, air pollution, pests, development and diseases have damaged many of the trees we love and need. Even last year's heavy rains added stress because the excessive water drowned the extended roots that had been reaching out for moisture during previous dry summers. And we never know from year to year how bad the gypsy moth infestation will be in our oaks, lindens, sweetgums and willows; some control is achieved by spraying with bacillus thu-ringiensis (BT)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2000
DETROIT - The nation's largest American elm, located in a cornfield near Traverse City, Mich., is dying of Dutch elm disease, according to a leading plant scientist. Samples from the elm, which is estimated to be at least 300 years old, were tested and the Dutch elm disease confirmed by R. Jay Stipes, professor of plant pathology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University in Blacksburg, Va. The tree is known as the Buckley elm, named after the town south of Traverse City where it's located.
NEWS
July 7, 1998
William D. Carey,82, a former Bureau of the Budget official who served under three presidents, died June 24 from chronic lung disease in Washington. He joined the Bureau of the Budget in 1942 and worked in the Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson administrations. He was the bureau's assistant director from 1966 to 1969.Harold Herthum,69, a character actor best known for his role as the doctor in "Forrest Gump," died Saturday in Baton Rouge, La. of a heart attack. He also was in "The Toy," "Tin Cup," "Blaze," "JFK," "Cobb" and "Solitude Point."
NEWS
By WALTER TRUETT ANDERSON | March 8, 1992
Life in America is being changed by biological newcomers: killer bees migrating northward from Mexico, Dutch Elm disease sweeping through the East and Midwest, Mediterranean fruit flies invading California orchards, the African-born AIDS virus causing a national health crisis.Stories about such problems surface almost daily in the news, but it has not yet quite dawned on the general public that these various isolated happenings are part of a larger pattern -- a huge global march of animals, plants, insects and microorganisms.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | July 20, 2003
We have a large shade tree in the front lawn that we think may be an American elm. Is this a rare tree now, and how can we tell if it is an elm? The American elm (Ulmus americana) was once a very common tree in the Eastern and Midwestern United States, but Dutch elm disease and other pest problems have killed many trees. This has made the tree somewhat rare and it is expected that many more trees will die. It is relatively easy to determine if you have an elm tree, but it can be difficult to determine whether it is an American elm or some other type of elm. First, take a look at the overall shape of the tree.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Once, the American elm was America's tree. Stately and sturdy, it lined the nation's avenues, adorned its parks and shaded its neighborhoods. Then Dutch elm disease struck.By the millions, the elms began to die. As the disease spread from state to state, thousands of communities witnessed the toll.Few battles were won against the disease. But there's hope on one front.Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found two new varieties of American elm that resist Dutch elm disease.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
Sixty years ago, a beetle-borne fungus arrived in the Unite States and began killing off Ulmus americana, the American elm.Dutch elm disease slowly destroyed the shady ambience of town squares, parks and college campuses. The infection wilted leaves, rotted limbs and eventually wiped out nearly 80 million trees.Now, scientists may have developed a solution. Researchers at the National Arboretum in Washington have created two varieties of elm tree that seem more resistant than any others to Ophiostoma ulmi, and thus may allow a comeback for the elm and the notably beautiful landscape it provides.
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