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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 13, 2003
Carnivale, HBO's new drama set in the backstage world of a spooky carnival troupe traveling though the Dust Bowl Southwest during the Great Depression, is dark, deep and scary. It's the stuff of which cold-sweat nightmares are made. And, after screening three episodes, I am as hooked on this moody, hypnotic saga as I've been on any drama since The Sopranos. I'm not saying this is going to be the next Sopranos. It's too idiosyncratic and strange for that. At best, Carnivale is more likely to become the kind of passionate but offbeat pleasure that Twin Peaks was for the cult of viewers that felt comfortable with dancing dwarves who spoke backward and nonlinear story lines that combined waking and dream states in a way that only producer David Lynch seemed to understand.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 8, 2012
July was the hottest in 118 years in the continental U.S., and the nation marked its warmest 12-month period for the fourth month in a row, according to a report released Wednesday. It was the third-hottest month of July for Maryland. The month was previously reported to be the fifth-hottest July on record for Baltimore . The average temperature for the contiguous states was 77.6 degrees last month. That is 3.3 degrees above the average July temperature over the 20th century and two-tenths of a degree hotter than the previous record, set during the Dust Bowl years in 1936.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2004
The Dust Bowl droughts that ruined millions of Great Plains farm families in the 1930s were triggered and sustained by barely perceptible temperature changes in oceans thousands of miles away, according to a new NASA study. Computerized climate simulations suggest that abnormally warm water in the tropical Atlantic set up wind circulation changes that cut off the flow of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico during the summer and fall. At the same time, unusually cool sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific set up global patterns that suppressed storm development on the Plains.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
Killing Che By Chuck Pfarrer What the Thunder Said By Janet Peery St. Martin's Press / 304 pages / $24.95 National Book Award finalist Janet Peery presents a novel of sibling rivalry in stories with What the Thunder Said. Sisters Mackie and Etta Spoon lead a seemingly prosaic life with their father, McHenry, in the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl. It's a harsh landscape and a harsher familial territory that the two young women traverse as they compete for the affections of their father and a Native American orphan, Audie, who has run away from a boarding school.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 4, 1999
Uh-oh. The Sun belt is moving North and the dust bowl is coming East.At last JHU will have a restaurant and bookstore district just off campus, which real universities like Harvard, Brown and Towson have long enjoyed.Everyone is so grateful that Hillary is running, so they can go on yacking about the state of the Clintons.Cheer up. There's no news in August.Pub Date: 8/04/99
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
Killing Che By Chuck Pfarrer What the Thunder Said By Janet Peery St. Martin's Press / 304 pages / $24.95 National Book Award finalist Janet Peery presents a novel of sibling rivalry in stories with What the Thunder Said. Sisters Mackie and Etta Spoon lead a seemingly prosaic life with their father, McHenry, in the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl. It's a harsh landscape and a harsher familial territory that the two young women traverse as they compete for the affections of their father and a Native American orphan, Audie, who has run away from a boarding school.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 8, 2012
July was the hottest in 118 years in the continental U.S., and the nation marked its warmest 12-month period for the fourth month in a row, according to a report released Wednesday. It was the third-hottest month of July for Maryland. The month was previously reported to be the fifth-hottest July on record for Baltimore . The average temperature for the contiguous states was 77.6 degrees last month. That is 3.3 degrees above the average July temperature over the 20th century and two-tenths of a degree hotter than the previous record, set during the Dust Bowl years in 1936.
NEWS
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2006
The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story Of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin / 340 pages / $28 The biblically minded will undoubtedly be put in mind of the Book of Job while reading The Worst Hard Time. The women and men who lived on the Great Plains covering portions of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico during the 1930s suffered relentless discomfort, poverty, illness and, sometimes, premature death because of a substance rarely thought of as deadly: dust.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1996
BURLINGTON, Colo. -- Wes Robbins, a toddler during the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s and a wheat farmer who survived the drought in the 1950s, doesn't want to say the word now.His fields of tender green winter wheat, usually as soft and thick as a boardroom carpet, are dotted with patches of raw brown earth, and the sky arches a hard, cloudless blue, the same nearly every day for the last nine months."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 22, 2002
Dust Bowl Refugees, Nancy Linden's latest show at Resurgam Gallery, continues the artist's earlier work on the theme of marginalized people while pointing out the problematic relationship between photography and truth. The show's title piece, an installation of paintings and collage that fills the entire front room of the gallery, is based on a famous Depression-era photograph by Dorothea Lange of six tenant farmers who have been thrown off their land. In Lange's picture, the men stand stolidly in front of an old-fashioned country store with their arms folded across their chests or hanging loosely at their sides as they stare into the camera.
NEWS
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2006
The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story Of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin / 340 pages / $28 The biblically minded will undoubtedly be put in mind of the Book of Job while reading The Worst Hard Time. The women and men who lived on the Great Plains covering portions of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico during the 1930s suffered relentless discomfort, poverty, illness and, sometimes, premature death because of a substance rarely thought of as deadly: dust.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Anthony Bullock takes the "picnic" part of Baltimore's annual Stone Soul Picnic seriously. Under a shady mesh shelter, the former Reservoir Hill resident had set out 25 pounds of snow crab legs, fried chicken, grilled fish, deviled eggs, chicken salad, macaroni salad, potato salad and collard greens, all prepared in his Perryville home. He had gone to Pennsylvania for corn on the cob, and made the sauce for his barbecue beef to feed 30 guests in his party, along with sundry police officers and fellow picnickers.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2004
The Dust Bowl droughts that ruined millions of Great Plains farm families in the 1930s were triggered and sustained by barely perceptible temperature changes in oceans thousands of miles away, according to a new NASA study. Computerized climate simulations suggest that abnormally warm water in the tropical Atlantic set up wind circulation changes that cut off the flow of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico during the summer and fall. At the same time, unusually cool sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific set up global patterns that suppressed storm development on the Plains.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 13, 2003
Carnivale, HBO's new drama set in the backstage world of a spooky carnival troupe traveling though the Dust Bowl Southwest during the Great Depression, is dark, deep and scary. It's the stuff of which cold-sweat nightmares are made. And, after screening three episodes, I am as hooked on this moody, hypnotic saga as I've been on any drama since The Sopranos. I'm not saying this is going to be the next Sopranos. It's too idiosyncratic and strange for that. At best, Carnivale is more likely to become the kind of passionate but offbeat pleasure that Twin Peaks was for the cult of viewers that felt comfortable with dancing dwarves who spoke backward and nonlinear story lines that combined waking and dream states in a way that only producer David Lynch seemed to understand.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 2003
EVEREST, Kan. - Kevin Compton, a 48-year-old farmer, recently walked in his cornfield to inspect the damage from a summer-long drought. He tore open an ear of corn and grimaced. "Look at this little bitty ear," he said, revealing a stunted, partly rotted corn cob. "This won't amount to nothing. Everything's gone." Compton then hopped in his Ford Explorer and drove a mile east to inspect some soybean acreage. It was even worse. "You see these spots?" he said, fingering a withering, pale-green soybean pod. "These are dying.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 22, 2002
Dust Bowl Refugees, Nancy Linden's latest show at Resurgam Gallery, continues the artist's earlier work on the theme of marginalized people while pointing out the problematic relationship between photography and truth. The show's title piece, an installation of paintings and collage that fills the entire front room of the gallery, is based on a famous Depression-era photograph by Dorothea Lange of six tenant farmers who have been thrown off their land. In Lange's picture, the men stand stolidly in front of an old-fashioned country store with their arms folded across their chests or hanging loosely at their sides as they stare into the camera.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Anthony Bullock takes the "picnic" part of Baltimore's annual Stone Soul Picnic seriously. Under a shady mesh shelter, the former Reservoir Hill resident had set out 25 pounds of snow crab legs, fried chicken, grilled fish, deviled eggs, chicken salad, macaroni salad, potato salad and collard greens, all prepared in his Perryville home. He had gone to Pennsylvania for corn on the cob, and made the sauce for his barbecue beef to feed 30 guests in his party, along with sundry police officers and fellow picnickers.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
It hasn't reached the proportion of the "Dust Bowl" - Art Modell's description of last season's touchdown drought of five games - but the Ravens' defense hasn't intercepted a pass in the past four games. That's been a contributing factor in the turnover ratio of minus-seven at the midpoint of the season, compared to plus-13 at the same juncture in 2000. "We need some," coach Brian Billick said. "We've had opportunities, had the ball in a position to make an impact. The good thing is, we're in position to make a play.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
It hasn't reached the proportion of the "Dust Bowl" - Art Modell's description of last season's touchdown drought of five games - but the Ravens' defense hasn't intercepted a pass in the past four games. That's been a contributing factor in the turnover ratio of minus-seven at the midpoint of the season, compared to plus-13 at the same juncture in 2000. "We need some," coach Brian Billick said. "We've had opportunities, had the ball in a position to make an impact. The good thing is, we're in position to make a play.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 4, 1999
Uh-oh. The Sun belt is moving North and the dust bowl is coming East.At last JHU will have a restaurant and bookstore district just off campus, which real universities like Harvard, Brown and Towson have long enjoyed.Everyone is so grateful that Hillary is running, so they can go on yacking about the state of the Clintons.Cheer up. There's no news in August.Pub Date: 8/04/99
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