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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Spring stirs pollen, and also dust - high-flying dust that's blown thousands of miles to reach North America in greater amounts than scientists have known before, with potential impact on the climate and air quality. Mineral dust rises from dry expanses in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, rides upper atmospheric winds for days across the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of the United States and beyond. More than two miles up, it can reach Maryland, where scientists at College Park, Greenbelt and Catonsville have been tracking its global travels with satellite-based instruments in a way they say is more accurate and covers a longer period of time than previous studies.
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NEWS
By Sue Van Essen, svanessen2@hotmail.com | April 25, 2014
Ever wonder which room in the house has the most dust?  Anthony Zverev  did. So he used dust distribution as the subject of his recent STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) project. Triggered on by his own bout of sneezing and coughing in the fall, the Villa Cresta Elementary School fourth-grader was driven to research dust mites and dust allergens. He then made the hypothesis the living room would have the greatest concentration of dust and outside would have the lowest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Hollywood never provided a richer picture of the Jim Crow South than Clarence Brown's "Intruder in the Dust," a fresh, inspired adaptation of William Faulkner's 1948 novel. It's not a message movie about racial injustice. It's about the American experience of growing up by crashing through the precepts and prejudices of your town, your state, your region — and your family. It combines a coming-of-age fable and a detective story with an acute dissection of tribal beliefs and herd mentality.
SPORTS
Sports Xchange | March 14, 2014
Guard Justin Black said the memory of last season's Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference championship-game loss fueled Morgan State all season and that the Bears are determined to make it over the final hurdle this year. Black took matters into his own hands in Morgan State's tournament opener Thursday night, making his first six shots from the field in the second half and finishing with a game-high 29 points as the third-seeded Bears blitzed No. 6 seed Florida A&M, 81-68, in the quarterfinals at Scope Arena in Norfolk, Va. "I just got into a rhythm," said Black, a first-team All-MEAC selection who scored 14 points and hit two 3-pointers during his second-half barrage as the Bears expanded a two-point halftime lead to 19 with less than 11 minutes left.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
The dust was thick enough that Sally Dworak-Fisher could trace letters in it with her finger. She feared that particles from rehab work next door were drifting into her Federal Hill home and coating many surfaces — even under the bathroom sink. But when she and other neighbors of the property contacted federal, state and local authorities about concerns that dust at the Henrietta Street house might contain toxic lead, everyone said some other agency was responsible. The residents' complaints, made earlier this month, demonstrate a breakdown at every level of government in the enforcement of laws and regulations meant to protect the public from the hazards of lead-based paint.
NEWS
By Nicky Penttila | March 27, 2004
HAVEN'T STARTED your spring cleaning yet? Consider putting it off - forever. Why disturb the interior ecosystem? The grime on the top of the fridge, for example, isn't harming anyone at the moment, but dusting it away could kick up particles of lead, pesticides, PCBs, mold and even toxins left over from past cleaning forays. It's tempting just to let those sleeping microbes lie. And it's not as if hosing down the house with those fancy antibacterial concoctions will reduce the number of fevers, sore throats or rashes in the family.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2006
While I vacuum some scary corner of my son's room, a strip of rubber molding peels off the nozzle attached to the household's antique Electrolux. Hooray! Finally, a legitimate excuse for ditching this infuriating contraption for something new. How could this vital attachment possibly be replaced? Until now, there has been no really good reason for sacking the 1960 Model G vac. In its prime, the Electrolux was an extravagance that must have dazzled homemakers with its aqua blue canister, art deco lettering and unmatched ability to dispatch dust bunnies.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 25, 1995
Sidney Poitier deserves better than "Children of the Dust."The four-hour, two-night mini-series, which begins at 9 tomorrow night on WJZ (Channel 13), isn't the worst mini-series of the season. In fact, it has patches of splendid acting and moments of great emotional intensity.Furthermore, it reminds viewers that America had a race problem long before slavery, and, like it or not, we've been a multi-cultural society since the first European stumbled onto land.But "Children of the Dust" is so calculated that ultimately it feels like one of those old movie serials -- the ones that flash "to be continued" across the screen just as the cowboy hero is about to leap across a gorge on horseback to escape a herd of charging buffalo or a gang of no-good varmints.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | December 17, 1990
BEIJING -- This capital city of more than 11 million inhabitants is running short of water. It releases most of its household and industrial wastewater untreated. In the winter, concentrations of hazardous chemicals and particles in its air are at times among the highest in the world.Then, in the spring, comes the yellow dragon -- suffocating, wind-borne clouds of fine yellow dust from the Gobi desert more than 200 miles away.Because of a decade-long campaign to plant trees in Beijing -- part of a massive effort to build a 4,000-mile-long "green great wall" of trees across all North China -- the number of days that the capital is positively choked by dust has been fewer in recent years, down from about 30 such days annually in the 1970s to only about 12 a year now.But each spring, when northwest winds take aloft the newly thawed topsoil of the Mongolian plateau, the resultant clouds of sand can still enshroud the city completely.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | April 16, 2000
THERE ARE several occasions during the renovation process when a torn-out wreck begins to look like ... a house. Or a kitchen. Or a master bedroom suite. These are exciting moments, because they mean there has been method in the madness, and a livable space will emerge from the chaos of construction. One such moment occurs after the electrical, plumbing and heating-air-conditioning rough-in inspections are complete, after the framing is finished and inspected, after the insulation is installed and inspected.
NEWS
By James Westwater | March 4, 2014
In our religious relationships there are frequently rituals and symbols: the sign of the cross, prayers, special embraces, a kiss. These customs are expressions of our humility, love and heartfelt needs. Many people who seldom go to church make a concerted effort to get there on Ash Wednesday to receive ashes. It is an annual ritual. As a boy, I recall churches opening at 6 a.m., so people could get their ashes before work. It seemed a curious thing to do, accepting a cross of ash on one's forehead - a symbol of our mortality and repentance.
NEWS
December 23, 2013
Every once in a while, a media kerfuffle arrives that succeeds in elevating some banal stupidity to unimaginable heights of urgency and importance. At the center of the frenzy is usually some basic cable TV program of questionable artistic merit but produced by people with a well-developed skill at self-promotion and touching the cultural zeitgeist. About an hour ago, it was either singer Miley Cyrus or tabloid queen Kim Kardashian and her family having their 15 minutes of fame saying or doing something outrageous.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Another chance for a light snow is ahead early Tuesday after frigid temperatures throughout the day Monday. Temperatures have been trending colder since early Monday morning, with the day's high possible to have come at 37 degrees around 3 a.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Temperatures dropped to 31 degrees by midday. Skies were mostly cloudy, expected to become overcast by the evening. An inch or less of snow is possible when two systems pass through Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | October 28, 2013
The cold months can be a tough time for those with allergies, especially those sensitive to mold and dust. “During the winter, families spend more time indoors, exposing allergic individuals to allergens and irritants like dust mites, pet dander, smoke, household sprays and chemicals, and gas fumes - any of which can make their lives miserable,” said Dr. William Reisacher, director of The Allergy Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 13, 2013
With Congress in the doldrums of summer recess, our town has inevitably sunk to the game of making political mountains out of molehills. The latest example is disclosure that the campaign manager of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell confided to a political associate, last January no less, that he was "sort of holding my nose for two years" working for Mr. McConnell. He was doing so, he explained, in hope of it being "a big benefit" for a previous employer, Sen. Rand Paul, also of Kentucky, who is said to have 2016 presidential aspirations.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The peak of hurricane season is approaching later this month, but storm activity in the middle of the Atlantic is unlikely to develop during the first half of August because of a massive cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert moving across the ocean. Satellite images from earlier this week (shown above) revealed a burst of dust blowing westward off of Africa. NASA Global Hawk aircraft were scheduled to explore the dust further on Tuesday. Saharan dust can significantly discourage tropical cyclone formation in the Atlantic, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 20, 1998
WICHITA, Kan. -- The June 8 explosions that killed seven people at the DeBruce Grain elevator started in a tunnel when a bearing on a conveyor belt apparently locked up, according to an expert investigating the incident.That set off a chain of events that produced heat to ignite highly explosive grain dust, said Vernon Grose, one of six experts hired by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.The initial blast set off explosions that continued throughout the elevator, killing seven people dead and injuring nine.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | July 26, 2008
The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Administration fined Domino Sugar $4,000 for allowing sugar dust to accumulate in its refinery, which is believed to have caused an explosion last year at the Key Highway plant in South Baltimore, according to a state report. The Nov. 2 explosion echoed across the harbor, and authorities said they suspected sugar dust might have ignited. Three employees suffered minor injuries, several pieces of equipment were destroyed and dozens of windows were shattered in the blast.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Spring stirs pollen, and also dust - high-flying dust that's blown thousands of miles to reach North America in greater amounts than scientists have known before, with potential impact on the climate and air quality. Mineral dust rises from dry expanses in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, rides upper atmospheric winds for days across the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of the United States and beyond. More than two miles up, it can reach Maryland, where scientists at College Park, Greenbelt and Catonsville have been tracking its global travels with satellite-based instruments in a way they say is more accurate and covers a longer period of time than previous studies.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
It never takes long for an event like Super Bowl Week to become a theatre of the absurd, so why should anyone have been surprised to see dozens of reporters crowded around a strange-looking guy in a stocking cap and sleeveless muscle shirt for more than an hour while he delivered a rambling manifesto about his special brand of miracle supplements and therapeudic devices? That would be Mitch Ross, of course, the guy at the center of the SI.com “deer antler” story a few days ago that made Ray Lewis temporarily divert attention from his “last ride” to deny that he never, ever used any banned performance-enhancing substances.
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