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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | January 21, 1994
...TC The owner of Nan Duskin, a three-store chain that specializes in upscale designer clothing, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Philadelphia.The company, ND Acquisition Inc., has a store at the Village of Cross Keys on Falls Road. It will remain open and there will be no layoffs, said Louis N. Marks, chairman and chief executive officer of ND Acquisition Inc.He said the company plans to add three people to the 15-person Baltimore sales force during the next year and to increase its inventory.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1994
Long & Foster closing officeAmid a slowdown in the housing market in metropolitan Baltimore, Long & Foster Real Estate Inc., the region's second-largest real estate company, will close one office by mid-November and will consider merging others, a company manager said yesterday.An office on Merritt Boulevard that serves Dundalk and Essex has not been profitable for the Fairfax, Va.-based company, said Alice Burch, Long & Foster's Baltimore regional manager. Agents have been asked to move to the Rosedale office, she said.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 1994
Duskin owner files for Chap. 11The owner of Nan Duskin, a three-store chain that specializes in designer clothing, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Philadelphia.The company, ND Acquisition Inc., has a store at the Village of Cross Keys on Falls Road. It will remain open, and there will be no layoffs, said Louis N. Marks, chairman and chief executive officer of ND Acquisition Inc.The other two stores are in Pennsylvania. The company lists $6.2 million in assets and $6 million in liabilities.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Oprah ate the fried chicken. Howard Cosell came for the breakfast specials. Katharine Hepburn stopped by in scuffed tennis shoes. And the Diner guys, once they outgrew french fries and gravy at the Hilltop Diner, switched their allegiance to the Cross Keys deli.For two decades, the famous noshed with the ordinary at the Village Food Center in North Baltimore's Village of Cross Keys.Retired schoolteachers grabbed a sandwich there after a game of golf. Smartly dressed shoppers took a break from browsing at Nan Duskin and Jones & Jones Inc. Families stood in line for Sunday brunch.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 4, 1991
Nan Duskin is upscale. Just how upscale?The Philadelphia-based retailer, which has one of its three stores in Cross Keys, sells $1,100 silk Chanel blouses and $2,400 Hermes pocketbooks so small that you'd be hard-pressed to fit a brush and comb inside.But don't feel intimidated, says Nan Duskin's new vice president and manager for Baltimore, Jane Ann Simpson."I want to change the perception that we are intimidating. We shouldn't be," says Ms. Simpson. "I don't want people to feel as if they have to dress to the nines to come in here.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994
Long & Foster closing officeAmid a slowdown in the housing market in metropolitan Baltimore, Long & Foster Real Estate Inc., the region's second-largest real estate company, will close one office by mid-November and will consider merging others, a company manager said yesterday.An office on Merritt Boulevard that serves Dundalk and Essex has not been profitable for the Fairfax, Va.-based company, said Alice Burch, Long & Foster's Baltimore regional manager. Agents have been asked to move to the Rosedale office, she said.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 14, 1994
Fashion is back in quickstep with the times. We had slowe down -- for a little while. We did penance for the greedy style of the '80s and its designer logos and snubby status turnouts. We've tried to be serious in the correct '90s demeanor by dressing like trail-worn pioneers, modern monastics or bedraggled Victorian match girls.This fall we can stop pretending. There is a place for glamour, humor and color in the active life of today's urban woman -- mother, careerist, do-gooder, party-goer.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | August 22, 1992
Nan Duskin casts a wider netNan Duskin is getting into middle-class values. The new owners of the haute couture clothing store at Cross Keys say the Baltimore store is going to be a lot less haute in the future.The rich and fashionable will still be able to buy $3,000 Chanel dresses and $190 Hermes men's shirts, but they might have to rub elbows with commoners who won't pay more than $70 for a pair of shorts from Ralph Lauren.President Marilyn Cooper, who, along with Chairman Lou Marks, bought the Nan Duskin chain last month, also promised the Baltimore store no longer will be a "stepchild" to the chain's two Philadephia boutiques.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | August 5, 1993
The designer trunk show is as old as traveling salesman jokes and as new as this week's hemlines. There was a time, before Elsa Klensch revealed the mysteries of the haute couture to one and all via cable TV, that the only way designer clothes could be seen was at tony local specialty stores. That's when designers packed up their entire collections in trunks and took them cross country to show them on models, explain their design direction and charm the customers into ordering those special frocks for the season ahead.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Fashion Editor | December 27, 1990
I KNOW, I KNOW. Only a few of us are in the market for a new resort wardrobe now.But those new fashions coming into the stores aren't just for women packing to go away for a warm-weather vacation; they include many items that can add some desperately needed variety to a tired winter wardrobe.Resort collections also provide the first opportunity for trying out the new spring trends -- a fresh palette of colors and simple dresses with matching jackets, to name just a few.The whole idea of the cruise/resort season is confusing, since the category stretches from December through February and has come to include everything from cotton short sets to lightweight wool suits.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 14, 1994
Fashion is back in quickstep with the times. We had slowe down -- for a little while. We did penance for the greedy style of the '80s and its designer logos and snubby status turnouts. We've tried to be serious in the correct '90s demeanor by dressing like trail-worn pioneers, modern monastics or bedraggled Victorian match girls.This fall we can stop pretending. There is a place for glamour, humor and color in the active life of today's urban woman -- mother, careerist, do-gooder, party-goer.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Hurt by severe weather and increased competition, Octavia Inc., a specialty retail shop in the Village of Cross Keys, hopes it can return to profitability through a combination of increased customer service and broader selection -- a strategy that is increasingly being used in the fierce specialty apparel sector.The 29-year-old company, known for its elegant and stately clothes and party dresses, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on March 17, listing $371,499.72 in assets and $388,862.70 in liabilities.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | January 21, 1994
...TC The owner of Nan Duskin, a three-store chain that specializes in upscale designer clothing, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Philadelphia.The company, ND Acquisition Inc., has a store at the Village of Cross Keys on Falls Road. It will remain open and there will be no layoffs, said Louis N. Marks, chairman and chief executive officer of ND Acquisition Inc.He said the company plans to add three people to the 15-person Baltimore sales force during the next year and to increase its inventory.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994
Duskin owner files for Chap. 11The owner of Nan Duskin, a three-store chain that specializes in designer clothing, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Philadelphia.The company, ND Acquisition Inc., has a store at the Village of Cross Keys on Falls Road. It will remain open, and there will be no layoffs, said Louis N. Marks, chairman and chief executive officer of ND Acquisition Inc.The other two stores are in Pennsylvania. The company lists $6.2 million in assets and $6 million in liabilities.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | August 5, 1993
The designer trunk show is as old as traveling salesman jokes and as new as this week's hemlines. There was a time, before Elsa Klensch revealed the mysteries of the haute couture to one and all via cable TV, that the only way designer clothes could be seen was at tony local specialty stores. That's when designers packed up their entire collections in trunks and took them cross country to show them on models, explain their design direction and charm the customers into ordering those special frocks for the season ahead.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
"My dressing room," says Connie Pitcher, "is probably more interesting than I am."She's being modest, but this lavish space is indeed a spectacle. Never mind the Chanel jackets and Calvin Klein suits in the closet. In between the mirrors and bath are a microwave, stereo, washer-dryer, phone, coffee maker and bookshelves."I don't know what it says about me, probably that I'm a little spoiled," says Ms. Pitcher, 45, who lives in Brooklandville.Having a well-organized wardrobe does help her manage a hectic life.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
"My dressing room," says Connie Pitcher, "is probably more interesting than I am."She's being modest, but this lavish space is indeed a spectacle. Never mind the Chanel jackets and Calvin Klein suits in the closet. In between the mirrors and bath are a microwave, stereo, washer-dryer, phone, coffee maker and bookshelves."I don't know what it says about me, probably that I'm a little spoiled," says Ms. Pitcher, 45, who lives in Brooklandville.Having a well-organized wardrobe does help her manage a hectic life.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Hurt by severe weather and increased competition, Octavia Inc., a specialty retail shop in the Village of Cross Keys, hopes it can return to profitability through a combination of increased customer service and broader selection -- a strategy that is increasingly being used in the fierce specialty apparel sector.The 29-year-old company, known for its elegant and stately clothes and party dresses, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on March 17, listing $371,499.72 in assets and $388,862.70 in liabilities.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | August 22, 1992
Nan Duskin casts a wider netNan Duskin is getting into middle-class values. The new owners of the haute couture clothing store at Cross Keys say the Baltimore store is going to be a lot less haute in the future.The rich and fashionable will still be able to buy $3,000 Chanel dresses and $190 Hermes men's shirts, but they might have to rub elbows with commoners who won't pay more than $70 for a pair of shorts from Ralph Lauren.President Marilyn Cooper, who, along with Chairman Lou Marks, bought the Nan Duskin chain last month, also promised the Baltimore store no longer will be a "stepchild" to the chain's two Philadephia boutiques.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 4, 1991
Nan Duskin is upscale. Just how upscale?The Philadelphia-based retailer, which has one of its three stores in Cross Keys, sells $1,100 silk Chanel blouses and $2,400 Hermes pocketbooks so small that you'd be hard-pressed to fit a brush and comb inside.But don't feel intimidated, says Nan Duskin's new vice president and manager for Baltimore, Jane Ann Simpson."I want to change the perception that we are intimidating. We shouldn't be," says Ms. Simpson. "I don't want people to feel as if they have to dress to the nines to come in here.
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