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Dushanbe

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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2001
DUSHANBE, Tajikistan - The faint rumble of an approaching war is transforming this run-down capital of a hitherto forgotten part of Central Asia. Dushanbe has suddenly awakened from years of isolation to find itself nearly the center of the world's attention. Vans stuffed with foreign diplomats tour the city's Soviet-era monuments. Black Mercedes with flags flapping on fenders fly down the streets, passing jitney vans and rattletrap taxis. And there are the rumors - that American troops are on their way. Or that they are already here.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2001
DUSHANBE, Tajikistan - The faint rumble of an approaching war is transforming this run-down capital of a hitherto forgotten part of Central Asia. Dushanbe has suddenly awakened from years of isolation to find itself nearly the center of the world's attention. Vans stuffed with foreign diplomats tour the city's Soviet-era monuments. Black Mercedes with flags flapping on fenders fly down the streets, passing jitney vans and rattletrap taxis. And there are the rumors - that American troops are on their way. Or that they are already here.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1991
'TC DUSHANBE, Tadzhikistan -- Here along the remote frontier of Soviet Central Asia, where men sit cross-legged on colorful cushions much as they did when Marco Polo rode through following the silk route to China, a small band of Communists is trying to stop the march of history.While Communists across the Soviet Union have been tearing up their party cards, the Tadzhik party bosses are holding fast before the democratic storm sweeping the crumbling red empire.The bosses who dominate the republic's parliament forced their president out when he acquiesced to democratic demands to suspend the Communist Party.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 4, 1995
PORSHINYOV, Tajikistan -- Midnight, and the people of the Pamirs are waiting, their dark shapes dimly lit against the flames of 450 bubbling caldrons in this narrow valley on the Afghan border.A steady rain falls as they stir their caldrons and wait. There is no hurry. They have been waiting 1,000 years.The Aga Khan is coming here, to the vaulting, nearly unreachable Pamir Mountains. Since early evening his followers have been arriving on foot, by car, by tractor or packed like bolts of brightly colored cloth onto the backs of trucks.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1991
DUSHANBE, Tadzhikistan -- A slender Muslim tower is rising unsteadily into the sky here, piercing the drab Soviet landscape with its bright mosaic sparkle.One day soon, a crier will wind his way up the narrow staircase and sing out the Muslim call to prayer. When he does, 70 years of Communist-imposed silence will be symbolically broken.Tadzhikistan's Muslims hope the call, issuing from Dushanbe's Central Mosque, will be answered with a revolution -- one that has implications for all of Central Asia.
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY | September 13, 1992
Moscow. -- Just a year ago, the huge statue of Lenin that stood in silent rebuke over the main square of Dushanbe in Tajikistan crashed to the ground. As the stony-faced head snapped off at the neck and amputated arms were carted off, Tajik society began a dismemberment that led last week to the routing of the president.The president, an old-line Communist party boss who was accused of being a drunk, had held out for a year against a reform-minded coalition of nationalists, democrats and Muslims.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 4, 1995
PORSHINYOV, Tajikistan -- Midnight, and the people of the Pamirs are waiting, their dark shapes dimly lit against the flames of 450 bubbling caldrons in this narrow valley on the Afghan border.A steady rain falls as they stir their caldrons and wait. There is no hurry. They have been waiting 1,000 years.The Aga Khan is coming here, to the vaulting, nearly unreachable Pamir Mountains. Since early evening his followers have been arriving on foot, by car, by tractor or packed like bolts of brightly colored cloth onto the backs of trucks.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
When the strong and feared seize power, those eager to prove their allegiance are quick to glorify the leader with statues on every square and portraits in every office. When the strongman falls, so do his statues. The giant statue of President Saddam Hussein in the center of Baghdad, Iraq, was toppled Wednesday. It was hollow inside, somehow symbolic even though such a large statue, made out of metal, would be too heavy to erect if it were not. Still, as one Russian writer has observed, when the Soviet Union was collapsing, it took hours for a Moscow crowd equipped with heavy-duty cranes to pull down the statue of Felix Dzerzhinsky, founder of the secret police.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 8, 1995
DUSHANBE, Tajikistan -- When the Soviet Union disintegrated into chaos, and the republics of Central Asia began changing governments and patterns of trade, one of the small, seemingly commonplace items that disappeared from the markets of Tajikistan was iodized salt.It has not reappeared. And the lack of it is threatening to damage one of the last treasures of Tajikistan -- its children.Iodine is an essential part of the human diet and contributes to the normal mental development of children before they are born, their learning ability as they grow up and, later in life, the regulation of metabolism.
NEWS
March 5, 2009
Lucille C. Schilling, a homemaker and volunteer, died Friday of pneumonia at National Lutheran Home in Rockville. The longtime Columbia resident was 83. Lucille Cameron was born and raised in Bourbon County, Ky. After graduating from the Fugazzi Business College in Lexington, Ky., she worked for several years at the Bluegrass Ordnance Depot. She was married in 1946 to Frederick K. Schilling Jr., a U.S. Foreign Service officer, and during his diplomatic assignments, the couple lived in Paris and in Oslo, Norway.
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY | September 13, 1992
Moscow. -- Just a year ago, the huge statue of Lenin that stood in silent rebuke over the main square of Dushanbe in Tajikistan crashed to the ground. As the stony-faced head snapped off at the neck and amputated arms were carted off, Tajik society began a dismemberment that led last week to the routing of the president.The president, an old-line Communist party boss who was accused of being a drunk, had held out for a year against a reform-minded coalition of nationalists, democrats and Muslims.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1991
DUSHANBE, Tadzhikistan -- A slender Muslim tower is rising unsteadily into the sky here, piercing the drab Soviet landscape with its bright mosaic sparkle.One day soon, a crier will wind his way up the narrow staircase and sing out the Muslim call to prayer. When he does, 70 years of Communist-imposed silence will be symbolically broken.Tadzhikistan's Muslims hope the call, issuing from Dushanbe's Central Mosque, will be answered with a revolution -- one that has implications for all of Central Asia.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1991
'TC DUSHANBE, Tadzhikistan -- Here along the remote frontier of Soviet Central Asia, where men sit cross-legged on colorful cushions much as they did when Marco Polo rode through following the silk route to China, a small band of Communists is trying to stop the march of history.While Communists across the Soviet Union have been tearing up their party cards, the Tadzhik party bosses are holding fast before the democratic storm sweeping the crumbling red empire.The bosses who dominate the republic's parliament forced their president out when he acquiesced to democratic demands to suspend the Communist Party.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 14, 2001
DUSHANBE, Tajikistan - Laylo Karimova readily agrees that life has gotten much better the past two years. After all, she has a roof over her head, and even if there's no glass in the windows she can get her hands on plastic sheeting. She works at the local bazaar and can sometimes make 40 cents or 80 cents a day. What more could a poor woman from the countryside, living in a small room here with her four children, ask for? Mauvjida Khikmatova feels the same. She left the drought-stricken Kulyab region three months ago, and now, living in a dormitory settlement with other migrants, she even has running water from a spigot in the courtyard, to wash her clothes and those of her five children.
TOPIC
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,Kathy Lally is a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 1993
Dushanbe, Tajikistan. -- Communism, which Russia imposed on an unwilling Central Asia, has taken on a brutal and bloody afterlife of its own here well after Moscow pronounced the system dead.The collapse of the Soviet Union brought independence to the Muslim countries on the politically sensitive perimeter of the collapsed Soviet empire, bordering Iran, Afghanistan and China. But independence hasn't brought freedom. It has brought repression, fear and death.Here in Tajikistan, statehood was greeted with a civil war that is deadly and vicious enough to threaten all of Central Asia.
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