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By Holly Selby | December 31, 2000
"Book Arts in the Age of Durer," on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art through Jan. 21, is a quiet exhibit for people who like to lean in and look closely. Those who do so will be richly rewarded with the sight of more than 100 exquisitely detailed books and prints that tell the story of early bookmaking in Northern Europe. The show focuses on the contributions made by Albrecht Durer, a master printmaker in the early 15th century, whose technical prowess and imagination transformed the book illustration industry and lifted the medium of wood carving to the level of art. He was no slouch in the marketing department, either: At the turn of the 15th century, rumors abounded about the end of the world.
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November 24, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 15, 2004
Within the protective sanctuary of his studio, Picasso imagined himself as a modern-day satyr, as a disembodied head summoning beautiful female forms into existence, even as Pygmalion, the mythical Greek sculptor of antiquity who created a marble statue of a woman so lifelike that he fell in love with her. For Picasso, as for generations of artists before him and since, the studio was a unique place rich in associations - not only a magical site of...
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November 17, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
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November 17, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
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November 24, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 2001
Albrecht Durer was the greatest German artist of the Renaissance, a powerful personality endowed with amazing technical facility and an obsession with his own genius rivaling that of his great Italian contemporary Leonardo da Vinci. To the people who bought his works, Durer's woodcuts and engravings were little short of miraculous. Durer's prints based on scenes from the Bible and classical myth were rendered with such meticulously realistic detail that to 16th-century viewers, they probably seemed more factual records of events than fruits of an artist's fancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 6, 2002
The show of hand-painted prints that opens today at the Baltimore Museum of Art is exactly the kind of exhibition museums are supposed to mount when they're doing their job right: thoughtful, carefully prepared visual essays that introduce innovative ideas and suggest new ways of understanding art. Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance & Baroque Engravings, Etchings & Woodcuts is a mouthful of an exhibition that will never be...
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By Mike Giuliano | November 3, 2011
Sometimes a single image just won't do. Printmakers often work in a series, enabling them to literally explore variations with their subject matter and technique. The Baltimore Museum of Art exhibit "Print By Print: Series from Durer to Lichtenstein" showcases such print series done between the 15th century and the present day. Whether lined up along the wall or arranged in grids, the 300 exhibited prints will keep your eyes moving along. The serial format is especially appropriate for printmakers who are visually interpreting Biblical or other literary source material.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1994
The Mitchell Gallery has made it official: Local art lovers will not have to travel to Amsterdam, London or even Washington to see originals by Rembrandt, Durer, van Dyck or Whistler this season.A short jaunt to the museum on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis will suffice.From Sept. 23 though Nov. 20, the Mitchell will exhibit 50 etchings produced by Rembrandt between 1628 and 1665. Organized by the Carnegie Museum and the American Federation of Art, "Rembrandt Etchings: Selections from the Carnegie Museum of Art" will display such masterworks as "The Hundred Guilder Print," "The Three Trees," "The Great Jewish Bride" and "Beggars Receiving Alms at the Door of a House."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 15, 2004
Within the protective sanctuary of his studio, Picasso imagined himself as a modern-day satyr, as a disembodied head summoning beautiful female forms into existence, even as Pygmalion, the mythical Greek sculptor of antiquity who created a marble statue of a woman so lifelike that he fell in love with her. For Picasso, as for generations of artists before him and since, the studio was a unique place rich in associations - not only a magical site of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 2001
Albrecht Durer was the greatest German artist of the Renaissance, a powerful personality endowed with amazing technical facility and an obsession with his own genius rivaling that of his great Italian contemporary Leonardo da Vinci. To the people who bought his works, Durer's woodcuts and engravings were little short of miraculous. Durer's prints based on scenes from the Bible and classical myth were rendered with such meticulously realistic detail that to 16th-century viewers, they probably seemed more factual records of events than fruits of an artist's fancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby | December 31, 2000
"Book Arts in the Age of Durer," on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art through Jan. 21, is a quiet exhibit for people who like to lean in and look closely. Those who do so will be richly rewarded with the sight of more than 100 exquisitely detailed books and prints that tell the story of early bookmaking in Northern Europe. The show focuses on the contributions made by Albrecht Durer, a master printmaker in the early 15th century, whose technical prowess and imagination transformed the book illustration industry and lifted the medium of wood carving to the level of art. He was no slouch in the marketing department, either: At the turn of the 15th century, rumors abounded about the end of the world.
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